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  #41  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 2:11 AM
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BTW, looking through the Planning Commission minutes for this year, it seems like the city is really moving through all of the tape to get the Port Authority Terminal started.
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  #42  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 5:47 AM
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That's pretty cool I like how it looks as if it's rising right on top of the freeway. I can't wait to see this same view next year when it's lit up like a Christmas tree
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  #43  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 7:53 AM
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Yea that do look good and I heard that the elevator shafts are not done increasing its height. I believe that it still has several more floors to go up to. I think Motor City comin from the lodge freeway downtown is going to make a huge statement and the MGM Grand.
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  #44  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 5:49 PM
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Yah, I should have done a loop and captured what it looked like coming in the opposite direction (from the north) but I was running short on time.
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  #45  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2006, 11:52 PM
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Yea go ahead and do that, too bad I havent been down there lately
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  #46  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2006, 12:37 AM
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Here's the new School of Business Administration at Wayne State University. It will be built on the west side of Woodward and the north side of Palmer.


And the Engineering Develoment Center located at Warren and 3rd Street.


I have no idea when the two projects are suppose to break ground, but I think I recall hearing summer of 06.
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  #47  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2006, 1:02 AM
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Wow, some very nice architecture, there! The first one will be a breath of fresh air to the Woodward streetscape. Michi, where can I find more information on the first building in particular? I see the architect of the second one, but would like some more information.
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  #48  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2006, 1:12 AM
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You know, LMich, Woodward REALLY needs large structures lining it to "shrink" its width. Even though the Palmer area is primarily a residential focused street, this really needs to happen to continue the focus of importance that Woodward and the university have.

You can find more information here:
http://www.waynefirst.wayne.edu/media_kit.php

I still have yet to read through it all.
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  #49  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2006, 1:35 AM
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Thanks.

Yeah, short of reducing lanes on Woodward (which seems like it will never happen in my lifetime), the only other way to make it more human-scaled is to build large buildings right to the street. I'm sure you noticed, but the setbacks of the museums and the like in the cultural center (and other areas along Woodward) can make the thing feel a mile wide. Just look at how wide the tiny Woodward Place at Brush Park make the street feel.
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  #50  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 1:02 AM
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I'm not sure why this is breaking news, but nonetheless...

Breaking news
Welcome center under construction in southwest Detroit
Leaders hope it will boost Mexicantown


April 19, 2006

In the shadow of the Ambassador Bridge, construction crews are humming, putting into reality a 30-year-old community dream for an international welcome center and marketplace to anchor the booming neighborhoods of southwest Detroit.

After three decades of talk, 10 years of development and almost a year of construction, concrete and steel beams are finally up for the $17 million, 45,000 square-foot Mexicantown International Welcome Center and Mercado.

The long-awaited project that will feature a public plaza and mercado — or marketplace — with three restaurants and vendors selling Latino-influenced products and wares, is expected to be completed by August and open to the public by November.

I saw the progress on this the other day and it look pretty good from far away. I hate the street patterns in that area, but hopefully with all the new bridge approach reconfiguring, things will fall into place nicely.

Looks like yet another photo I need to go out and fetch.
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  #51  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 1:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvel 33
Hey guys, sorry for getting off topic here but I was wondering if anybody would be interested in helping out with putting together a list of all the Detroit forumers so I can post it on the How many forumers do we have per city? thread I created on Skybar. I also need it so I know exactly how many of you forumers we have.

You can either post it yourself or you can send me a private message with the names and I'll post it.

Here is a link to the thread: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=103189

Thanks!
Though I haven't lived in Detroit for 5 years, but after growing up their, I still consider myself a Detroiter. I don't know if that counts though.
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  #52  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 2:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michi
I'm not sure why this is breaking news, but nonetheless...

Breaking news
Welcome center under construction in southwest Detroit
Leaders hope it will boost Mexicantown


April 19, 2006

In the shadow of the Ambassador Bridge, construction crews are humming, putting into reality a 30-year-old community dream for an international welcome center and marketplace to anchor the booming neighborhoods of southwest Detroit.

After three decades of talk, 10 years of development and almost a year of construction, concrete and steel beams are finally up for the $17 million, 45,000 square-foot Mexicantown International Welcome Center and Mercado.

The long-awaited project that will feature a public plaza and mercado — or marketplace — with three restaurants and vendors selling Latino-influenced products and wares, is expected to be completed by August and open to the public by November.

I saw the progress on this the other day and it look pretty good from far away. I hate the street patterns in that area, but hopefully with all the new bridge approach reconfiguring, things will fall into place nicely.

Looks like yet another photo I need to go out and fetch.
It's about damn time. lol Weren't they supposed to have started in 2003?
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  #53  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 2:28 AM
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Yah, I don't know what happened. You would have thought this was the Book Cadillac. Just evidence that Detrot development takes FOREVER!!...The Ellington is just getting annoying. Skyscrapers in Chicago started before Ellington have been open for 16 years now.
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  #54  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 3:21 AM
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What happened was what happens to most projects here lack of $$$. A lot of this was financed with donations and it's not high profile like the Riverwalk it just took longer to raise it than expected. This isn't even breaking news it not like they just started working it. But eh it's par for the media around here, a day late and a dollar short

Anyway I really like what WSU is building on Woodward. It's too bad they killed South University Village WSU could've had a really great presence
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  #55  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 3:31 AM
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Yeah, WSU definitely look some steps backwards in killing South Village and the whole Chatsworth Annex debacle.
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  #56  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 4:16 AM
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Yea I'm looking forward to seeing WSU developments take place

Last edited by toog05; Apr 21, 2006 at 5:09 AM.
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  #57  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2006, 4:08 PM
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Yah South University Village was a real disappointment. The developer was from Chicago and was SO excited to build a presence in Detroit. They wanted to bring a piece of "Chicago" to Midtown Detroit.

The reason WSU dropped the ball was because they thought occupancy numbers were too risky.

I sat through a presentation by the developer and what impressed me most was his selling of "eyes on the street" type of development...meaning zero-setbacks, no parking garage presence, retail, residential, commercial, garden space, etc...

This is something I believe Midtown is severly lacking which is why there's so many car thefts, break-ins, and other petty crimes that are nonsense. To build housing is only one fraction of the total pie. To build a quality environment in which to live makes up the bulk of the rest. And like I said, we could really use some of what that developer from Chicago was advocating here because evidently, we don't really know how to do it.
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  #58  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2006, 4:37 AM
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Some more from www.modeldmedia.com



24-unit Chesterfield Apartments ready for tenants
The redevelopment of the Chesterfield Apartments, a 24-unit income-restricted apartment building on Cass just north of MLK Boulevard, is complete and the building is now accepting tenants. The Chesterfield underwent extensive and high-quality renovations as mandated by the Cass Corridor Neighborhood Development Corporation (CCNDC), the project’s developer.

Pat Dorn, CCNDC’s director, describes the project as “a total gut rehab, which means that each unit was brought back to four walls, all new mechanical in the building, and preserved hardwood floors throughout except the first floor terrazzo. We used any interior brick wall for the aesthetic effect, all counters are marble, [we used] oak cabinets, and there are ceramic tiles in the bathrooms.”

The renting process, which is managed by Pinncale, is completely income driven. The allowable income levels range from $18,582 for one person to $26,562 for four persons, the maximum number of residents allowed in each two-bedroom apartment.

Dorn stresses the necessity for income-restricted housing in Midtown. “In order to keep a mix in any neighborhood, you need to reserve good housing for lower income people. This is a neighborhood with high levels of potential employers like Wayne State, Detroit Medical Center, casinos, and downtown. It’s a good, safe place for people to get started.”

For information about the Chesterfield, contact Pinnacle at 313-831-2878.

Source, Pat Dorn, Cass Corridor Neighborhood Development Corporation




Oddfellows Halll renovation 75 percent complete in Southwest Detroit
Southwest Detroit Business Association’s (SDBA’s) redevelopment of Oddfellows Hall is proceeding at a rapid clip with 75 percent of the project completed, according to Larry Ladomer of L. W. Ladomer & Company, the project’s developer. “It’s been very fast-paced in spite of the fact we’ve run into some obstacles. We ran into structural problems — the structural steel had to be lowered — and soil conditions required us to put in larger [concrete] pads than were originally designed for the columns.”

The 15,000 square-foot building, located on Vernor at Springwells, was constructed for the Detroit branch of the Oddfellows, a fraternal group of do-gooders that migrated to the U.S from their native England in 1819. The project was awarded a Cool Cities designation from the State of Michigan in 2004 to be utilized as a cultural and community center, which, as Ladomer notes, “was very fitting. This building was built in 1917 to help people, [and] SDBA is going to do same thing.”

The building is three stories tall although the front half of the structure has only two floors because the Great Room, a 3,200 square-foot open space, has such high ceilings. Notable features of the space include a ring of lights comprised of 31 brass flower petals that had been covered up by a dropped ceiling and a narrow plank maple floor laid in an unusual log cabin design. The first floor will be leased out for retail, and the rear two upper stories will be made available to local nonprofits.

The Oddfellows Hall features a state-of-the art geothermal heating and cooling system that utilizes 45 wells drilled to a depth of 250 feet to circulate heat away from the building in the summer and towards the building in the winter. Ladomer notes that the system “is extremely environmentally clean—there is no gas in the building, it’s a totally electric building, but our heating and cooling costs will be 50 percent or less than it would be with a conventional system.”

Although the initial cost of installing a geothermal system can initially be up to three times as expensive as a conventional one, Ladomer says that rising energy costs mean that payback occurs in only six years. “You have to ask yourself, am I going to build for now, or build for the future?” The project is expected to be complete by the end of May; its architect is Lis Knibbe of Quinn Evans Architects.

Larry Ladomer, LW Ladomer & Company, owner’s representative for Southwest Detroit Business Association




City OKs brownfield credits for Crystal Lofts in Midtown
Brownfield tax credits to be used towards the redevelopment of the Crystal Lofts located on Woodward at Watson have been approved by the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation and are now waiting for approval at the state level. Dwight Belyue, owner of Belmar Development Group, says the project budget is being finalized and Phase One construction will begin within two months.

Phase One of the Crystal Lofts consists of 17 lofts ranging from 950-2,200 square feet and 14,000 square feet of first floor retail space. Belyue says, “The building used to be the Crystal Ballroom, with a ballroom on the second floor and retail on the first floor.”

Belyue plans to develop the remainder of the 3100 block of Woodward, and is currently evaluating the site plan with architects Hamilton Anderson Associates. Preliminary plans for Phase Two call for 150-175 residential units, additional retail space, and the construction of a new headquarter building for the King David Lodge of the Masons.

Dwight Belyue, Belmar Development Group




Historic Kahn print shop in Midtown to become retail/medical complex
The Michigan Economic Development Authority approved a plan for the city of Detroit to capture state and local taxes valued at about $350,000 to support the redevelopment of a historic structure next to the Bonstelle Theatre. Designed by Albert Kahn in 1912 and built in 1919 as a print shop, the building, located at 3408-3414 Woodward Avenue, has sat vacant for decades.

The developer, PPM Acquisitions of Troy, plans to convert the 32,000 square-foot building into a retail complex. PPM’s Adam Nyman describes their vision: “There will be office and medical uses on the entire second floor, 5,300 square feet of retail on the first floor, and the remainder of the first floor will be indoor parking.” The building, made of poured, reinforced concrete, will be taken down to its shell during the rehab. The estimated cost of the project is $2.4 million.

This is PPM’s first Detroit project. Nyman explains his company’s decision to invest in Midtown by noting, “It’s a beautiful building, and what caught my eye was its proximity to the best of Detroit: downtown, Wayne State, the Cultural Center, the library, Detroit Medical Center. Really, everything going on in Detroit is going on in this area.”

Source: Adam Nyman, Developer, 3408-3414 Woodward
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  #59  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2006, 4:44 AM
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I'm inpresed to see some cranes but not really when its on a casino. I am hopen maybe some new high rise residence and comercial. But non the less I'm happy detriot isn't as dead as alot of people say it is.
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  #60  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2006, 5:03 PM
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Edgy new art museum headed to Detroit

Opening date is set for October at Woodward and Garfield among several art galleries.

Joy Hakanson Colby / The Detroit News

An impressive and ambitious group of Metro Detroit art-world movers plans to open a museum on the edge Detroit's cultural center this fall.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit will be located in a 1920s building on the southeast corner of Woodward Avenue at Garfield Street, said Marsha Miro, volunteer acting director of the museum's founding board. The museum will be near a strip of galleries that includes CPop and the Detroit Artists Market.

The influential board includes Townsend Hotel owner Keith Pomeroy, arts advocate Julie Taubman, fashion boutique owner Linda Dresner, and video producer Danialle Karmanos.

The museum will concentrate on the art of today, while the Detroit Institute of Arts maintains an encyclopedic collection that goes back to prehistorical time. Also, the new museum will not build a permanent collection but will stage special exhibitions.

While some insiders are excited about the venture's prospects, others are dubious about its financial feasibility. But, all agree the need is there.

Gilbert Silverman, an internationally respected collector of contemporary art and a Detroit Institute of Arts board member emeritus, believes it will be difficult for a young museum to survive on its own during a soft economy when all arts organizations are competing for shrinking funds.

He said he's heard seasoned museum veterans estimate that such a venture would need a $20 million endowment to yield the $1 million needed for annual operating funds. Instead of being independent, Silverman argues, "it should be part of the DIA."

But Barbara Kratchman, president of ArtServe Michigan, an art advocacy group, is confident of the museum's success.

"If you look at who these people are, they're younger people who can afford to bring substantial resources to the museum, and it will attract other people like them," she said. "There are many young collectors who want to learn more about contemporary art."

George N'Namdi, owner of the G.R. N'Namdi gallery, is thrilled about the museum.

"It's something we've needed in our community for a long time. A lot of other communities have contemporary museums but we don't have one. There will be challenges (in getting MOCAD off the ground), but they're going about it in a very positive way and they have the ability to accomplish what they've set out to do.

"It will broaden the base of patrons for art," N'Namdi said. "The DIA can't get everyone to come out. If anything, this will provide the kind of positive competition that helps everyone grow."

The DIA, which is struggling to complete its $158 million renovation project by fall 2007, is not a likely partner.

Said DIA director Graham W.J. Beal: "I have had conversations with the MOCAD people over the past couple years. But we are not formally involved."

Michelle Perron, director of the nearby Center Galleries on the campus of the College for Creative Studies, welcomes the museum. "The potential this project has for reinvigorating the arts in our community is great. I have high hopes for their success," she said.

"There's been a burning need for a contemporary museum here," said Detroit artist Mitch Cope, who is acting curator for the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit. "Other cities like Boston, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami and Cincinnati all have such institutions."

Later this year, he is expected to present a "Shrinking Cities" exhibit at the new museum in collaboration with Cranbrook Art Museum.

This isn't the first contemporary art museum in the area.

The Museum of New Art, which has operated for 10 years in Detroit and Pontiac, is struggling and artist Jef Bourgeau has supported it out of his own pocket for most of that time.

Meanwhile, plans for the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit are being finalized. It will rent space from the Manoogian Foundation, which owns the building. Masco Corp. head Richard Manoogian, one of the main supporters of the Detroit Institute of Arts, is not involved financially with the new museum, according to Lillian Bauder, Masco vice president and DIA board member emeritus.

"The Manoogian Foundation stipulates that the building must play a civic and cultural role in the community," Bauder said. "MOCAD had the right qualifications to rent the space because they will show art of high quality."

Andrew Zago, who has offices in Detroit and New York, signed on as the architect for the new museum. "Initially, the project will be modest," Zago said. "We will do what is necessary to get the 20,000 square feet of space ready for showing art."

Zago described the one-story building as "structurally sound with 18-foot ceilings." He added that it originally served as an automobile showroom.

Miro said New Yorker Klaus Kertess, a well-known dealer, art writer and educator, is working on an inaugural exhibit of installations featuring such nationally known artists as Kara Walker, Barry McGee and Nari Ward.

"We want to bring in people from outside with independent voices," Miro said.

http://detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/art...NT01/604210344
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