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  #121  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2017, 1:56 AM
Docere Docere is offline
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If you literally split Manhattan along Fifth Avenue, the Upper West Side gets to claim Central Park for itself!

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/23/nyregion/23fifth.html

Last edited by Docere; Jan 3, 2017 at 1:51 AM.
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  #122  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2017, 2:07 AM
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240glt 240glt is offline
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We live in the south east but we're actually north of the city centre, but south of the river, but our address is in the NW quadrant. We're right on the edge of the city limits but literally less than ten minutes to the centre. Edmonton makes no sense
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  #123  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2017, 5:42 AM
canarob canarob is offline
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Originally Posted by GlassCity View Post
What makes the real estate in far flung suburbs like Vaughan and Richmond Hill so expensive? I can't imagine greenfield developments here going for those kinds of prices.
I think there's a few factors behind the pricing:

1. The central part of southern York Region is immediately north of some pretty nice Toronto neighbourhoods, so they are actually cheaper than what's immediately south of them. This isn't case on the western and eastern edges of York Region as there's some less desirable neighbourhoods to the south (the "doughnut" of the inner 416 suburbs), so in these areas prices tend to go up as you get further from the city (to a point). For example moving from Scarborough to Markham is generally seen as "moving up" to a nicer area.
2. York Region has some of the best schools in the country and there's very little crime, so some of this has to do with the quality of the suburbs themselves.
3. I'm not sure about Vaughan and Richmond Hill, but I know that Markham has more people commuting into it than out of it every day. It has a huge number of jobs for a suburb. If this stat isn't yet true for Vaughan and Richmond Hill, it will be eventually. For many of these folks, distance to downtown Toronto isn't a huge factor. For those that work in downtown Toronto, there are three GO lines in the region and there will soon be a subway in Vaughan. This is part of the reason house prices are more expensive in York than Oakville and other 905 suburbs now.
4. The area is a huge magnet for Chinese, Iranian, Russian, Italian, south asian and other communities. Many of these new immigrants are at least as rich as the "old money" in places like Oakville.
5. The only greenfield left in southern York is generally condos and townhomes, which has driven up the price of any existing detached home tremendously.
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  #124  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2017, 8:50 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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If you compare the similar sized "towns" of Richmond Hill and Oakville, both have similar proportions of university graduates and professional occupations (around 46-47%) Incomes are higher in Oakville, but housing prices are higher in RH. I suspect incomes are a bit lower in RH than its class status suggests due to larger and more multigenerational immigrant families, plus many immigrants families have brought a significant amount of capital with them but that may not translate (yet) into very high incomes in Canada.
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  #125  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2017, 8:58 PM
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Originally Posted by 240glt View Post
We live in the south east but we're actually north of the city centre, but south of the river, but our address is in the NW quadrant. We're right on the edge of the city limits but literally less than ten minutes to the centre. Edmonton makes no sense
I recall it took me a little while after moving to Edmonton some years back to figure out that nearly the entire city is considered "NW".
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  #126  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2017, 10:23 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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How are the ends/sides/sections subdivided? Toronto still has the old boroughs as geographic reference points and communities. In the old city of Toronto I think it is most commonly seen as:

Central area/downtown - Bathurst to Don River below Dupont/Rosedale Valley

West end - Everything west of Bathurst

East end - Everything east of the DVP

Midtown and North Toronto - north of the central area and east of Bathurst. North Toronto is north of St. Clair; the Bloor to St. Clair area I guess is midtown but sometimes people say Yonge and Eglinton is midtown (which leaves this Bloor to St. Clair area not well defined).

Another way could have the west start at Spadina and the east start at Jarvis, but that really doesn't really work north of Bloor, which may be its own thing. Spadina to Jarvis is basically a neutral zone.

The west end is rather big, and the northwest fringe of the Old City feels rather different than the inner west end.
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  #127  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2017, 5:10 AM
Docere Docere is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canarob View Post
I think there's a few factors behind the pricing:

1. The central part of southern York Region is immediately north of some pretty nice Toronto neighbourhoods, so they are actually cheaper than what's immediately south of them. This isn't case on the western and eastern edges of York Region as there's some less desirable neighbourhoods to the south (the "doughnut" of the inner 416 suburbs), so in these areas prices tend to go up as you get further from the city (to a point). For example moving from Scarborough to Markham is generally seen as "moving up" to a nicer area.
2. York Region has some of the best schools in the country and there's very little crime, so some of this has to do with the quality of the suburbs themselves.
3. I'm not sure about Vaughan and Richmond Hill, but I know that Markham has more people commuting into it than out of it every day. It has a huge number of jobs for a suburb. If this stat isn't yet true for Vaughan and Richmond Hill, it will be eventually. For many of these folks, distance to downtown Toronto isn't a huge factor. For those that work in downtown Toronto, there are three GO lines in the region and there will soon be a subway in Vaughan. This is part of the reason house prices are more expensive in York than Oakville and other 905 suburbs now.
4. The area is a huge magnet for Chinese, Iranian, Russian, Italian, south asian and other communities. Many of these new immigrants are at least as rich as the "old money" in places like Oakville.
5. The only greenfield left in southern York is generally condos and townhomes, which has driven up the price of any existing detached home tremendously.
Thought I'd continue this discussion here:

http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/show...=1#post7669255
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  #128  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2017, 11:14 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
How are the ends/sides/sections subdivided? Toronto still has the old boroughs as geographic reference points and communities. In the old city of Toronto I think it is most commonly seen as:

Central area/downtown - Bathurst to Don River below Dupont/Rosedale Valley

West end - Everything west of Bathurst

East end - Everything east of the DVP

Midtown and North Toronto - north of the central area and east of Bathurst. North Toronto is north of St. Clair; the Bloor to St. Clair area I guess is midtown but sometimes people say Yonge and Eglinton is midtown (which leaves this Bloor to St. Clair area not well defined).

Another way could have the west start at Spadina and the east start at Jarvis, but that really doesn't really work north of Bloor, which may be its own thing. Spadina to Jarvis is basically a neutral zone.

The west end is rather big, and the northwest fringe of the Old City feels rather different than the inner west end.
I live between Spadina and Bathurst, near Kensington Market, and in some ways I feel I'm in the West End.

The transition west of downtown is quite a bit smoother than going east, due to both more "urban renewal" in what planners called the Don District, as well as the time lag in development east of the Don.
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