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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:05 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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What is "downtown"?

Inspired by Hipster Duck's thread. which raises the question of what separates downtown from the rest of the city.

In others, what makes a downtown and how do you define downtown?

Vancouver has the "Downtown Peninsula" which includes downtown proper as well as the very urban and densely populated West End.

Toronto's downtown definition is quite extensive, and is really more of a greater downtown, stretching from Bathurst to the Don and from Yorkville to the lake. Certainly the Financial District, the area around City Hall and Dundas Square and the Entertainment District are downtown, but what about Church-Wellesley, Yorkville, Bay-Cloverhill, the Grange, Kensington, Harbord Village etc.
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Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:07 PM
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Everything you mentioned there is in downtown Toronto.

My only question is the western boundary which fluctuates between Bathurst in the North at Bloor and Dufferin near the lake.
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Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:19 PM
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As I'm sure is the case everywhere else, in St. John's there are a few different things people might mean when they say "downtown".

"The Downtown" is a clearly-defined neighbourhood that is mostly commercial but includes some residential areas closest to the core (which, in turn, are these days mainly rental suites, hostels, etc.).



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Last edited by SignalHillHiker; Apr 18, 2017 at 11:18 PM.
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Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:40 PM
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For Ottawa: the area between Bronson, Somerset, the Canal, and Ottawa River, excluding a big of the golden triangle and adding about a block around Sussex and Rideau.

Hamilton's is really blurry. Partly because people on the mountain consider practically the whole lover city 'downtown'. But for a more standard count... Bay, Hunter, Wellington, and Cannon maybe?

Thunder Bay north is probably bounded by Pearl, Algoma, and Camelot. South I'm less sure... Miles, Vickers, Arthur, and . . . either Simpson or the River depending on how picky you feel.
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Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:41 PM
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In Kingston it's generally considered anything east of Division Street along Princess, Queen, Brock and Johnson Streets, as well as anything along Lake Ontario between the causeway and Gore Street. I've heard some broader definitions that stretch west to Bath Road.
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Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 9:43 PM
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For me the TTC map better describes what I consider Downtown Toronto to be. The traditional borders of Bathurst and the Don I think have spilled over into more urban built up areas now. I used to live at Ossignton and College which I considered downtown, I now liver near Queen and Broadview I feel like it's more downtown then my last address. If we are discussing neighbourhoods then downtown is a much smaller region but the downtown or the parts of the city where people are considered downtowner's is much larger. In the East I'd go as far to say the Beacheas is the eastern border of downtown Toronto where people who consider themselves downtowners live. In the west Bloor West Village and the Junction, and to the north almost everything south of St Clair east of Dufferin and west of O'connor.

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Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 10:20 PM
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Edmonton doesn't have a downtown. It chose to build its fort, and eventual main street on higher ground. So it has an uptown. But then most of Edmonton is uptown.
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Old Posted Apr 18, 2017, 11:34 PM
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Downtown Winnipeg is bounded roughly by the Red River to the east, the Assiniboine River to the south, Isabel/Colony/Memorial/Osborne North street(s) to the west and the CPR tracks to the north. Population 18,000 in about 4.1 sq km.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 12:44 AM
Docere Docere is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TorontoDrew View Post
For me the TTC map better describes what I consider Downtown Toronto to be. The traditional borders of Bathurst and the Don I think have spilled over into more urban built up areas now. I used to live at Ossignton and College which I considered downtown, I now liver near Queen and Broadview I feel like it's more downtown then my last address. If we are discussing neighbourhoods then downtown is a much smaller region but the downtown or the parts of the city where people are considered downtowner's is much larger. In the East I'd go as far to say the Beacheas is the eastern border of downtown Toronto where people who consider themselves downtowners live. In the west Bloor West Village and the Junction, and to the north almost everything south of St Clair east of Dufferin and west of O'connor.
That's almost all of the Old City of Toronto.

Bathurst to Don is already a rather extensive definition IMO.
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 12:53 AM
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Downtown Edmonton is a geographic area for the Downtown Edmonton Community (1 of 158 communities in our city), for the City of Edmonton and for the Downtown Business Association.

Sometimes legal, other times symbolic.
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  #11  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 1:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
That's almost all of the Old City of Toronto.

Bathurst to Don is already a rather extensive definition IMO.
TorontoDrew's description is more of "living in the city" to me. Downtown is more Bathurst-Jarvis, Bloor-the lake.

I live in the Queen and Dufferin area, and while I certianly live in the city, I wouldn't say I live downtown in the traditional sense. That said, when my parents visit from the outer suburbs, they say they are heading downtown. So its a matter of perspective.
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  #12  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 1:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
As I'm sure is the case everywhere else, in St. John's there are a few different things people might mean when they say "downtown".

"The Downtown" is a clearly-defined neighbourhood that is mostly commercial but includes some residential areas closest to the core (which, in turn, are these days mainly rental suites, hostels, etc.).



You really like showing off that map, don't you?
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  #13  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 9:24 AM
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You really like showing off that map, don't you?
It's just so easy. I've probably posted sections of it 1,000 times yeah. Sorry!
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  #14  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 11:28 AM
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Windsor's downtown extends from the Detroit River south to Erie St, west to Caron Ave. and east to Aylmer St. Not a very big area!
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 1:12 PM
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Downtown is a state of mind........

I can probably think of 4-5 theories as to what actually constitutes downtown Moncton.

I think that Downtown Moncton Incorporated (the business development agency) defines DT as being south of St George St, and between Vaughan Harvey Blvd and King St
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 1:24 PM
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Downtown Fredericton is pretty obvious; it's the block of buildings with commerical, office and apartments right in the core of the city, hemmed in by Westmoreland Street to the west, Regent street to the East, and running along King and Queen streets.

Go outside those boundaries and it really quickly turns into residential houses, the government buildings and/or the cemetery. The city itself has basically defined the downtown area slightly bigger; reaching out to just past Smythe Street; and those blocks are nicely densifying, but they are still a bit to suburban for me to personally consider them part of the Downtown core yet.

When you look at Google Maps of that area of Fredericton, "Downtown" IMO would be the parts shaded light orange/brown along those blocks basically.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 1:26 PM
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The Question: "What is Downtown?"
The Answer:
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 1:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
That's almost all of the Old City of Toronto.

Bathurst to Don is already a rather extensive definition IMO.
This seems to be a perennial Toronto point of contention. A lot of people seem to define practically anywhere between the Don and the Humber as downtown. I get that if someone is in, say, Markham, and they're going to Parkdale, they might say they're going "downtown" as a general directional indicator.

But that seems to be a suburban conflating of "urban" or "old" with "downtown". Realistically, I think it's approximately Sherburne to University, below Bloor. And there's an argument to be made that it widens out the further south you go. i.e., I wouldn't call the Annex between Spadina and Bathurst downtown, but I could see Queen West as far as Spadina, and King West as far as Bathurst.

But if I'm on Ossington or Parliament, I'm not downtown.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 2:00 PM
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Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
The Question: "What is Downtown?"
The Answer:
Video Link
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  #20  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 2:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
The Question: "What is Downtown?"
The Answer:
Video Link
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