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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 3:55 PM
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Toronto/Montreal equivalents

Inspired by the TO/Van thread. This hasn't been done AFAIK.
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 4:32 PM
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 4:45 PM
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Mile End / Kensington

Lower Westmount / Summerhill and Yonge-St. Clair area

Upper Westmount / either Rosedale or Forest Hill around UCC

Outremont / The Annex (?)

NDG / Bathurst-St. Clair-Vaughan Rd. area (?)

Cote St. Luc / Bathurst-Sheppard area
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 4:47 PM
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The Decarie and the Gardiner: main access into downtown via crumbling 1960s-era urban blights that are chronically congested and lack safe shoulders or merging lanes. A fender bender every rush hour.

The 401 and the Met: congested crosstown artery that also serves as main through road, built through immediate postwar areas just north of where the urban city more or less ends. Jammed with trucks.

Laval and Mississauga: large, rural township of former farm villages merged to become giant, suburban municipalities with manufactured town centres.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 4:49 PM
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NDG - Leslieville
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 4:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
The Decarie and the Gardiner: main access into downtown via crumbling 1960s-era urban blights that are chronically congested and lack safe shoulders or merging lanes. A fender bender every rush hour.

The 401 and the Met: congested crosstown artery that also serves as main through road, built through immediate postwar areas just north of where the urban city more or less ends. Jammed with trucks.

Laval and Mississauga: large, rural township of former farm villages merged to become giant, suburban municipalities with manufactured town centres.
Decarie crumbling ? It's been entirely renovated in the last few years; it looks brand new. Also, it's a trenched expressway, not an elevated one.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 5:04 PM
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Decarie crumbling ? It's been entirely renovated in the last few years; it looks brand new.
That's good. It needed it.

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Also, it's a trenched expressway, not an elevated one.
Same difference. The Decarie is arguably more of a blight since it actually involved mass demolition of urban neighbourhoods, and physically cutting NDG off from the rest of the city, whereas the Gardiner only involved the demolition of a few dozen houses. Toronto was always psychologically cut off from the lake by the railway pretty much from the start.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 5:24 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
That's good. It needed it.



Same difference. The Decarie is arguably more of a blight since it actually involved mass demolition of urban neighbourhoods, and physically cutting NDG off from the rest of the city, whereas the Gardiner only involved the demolition of a few dozen houses. Toronto was always psychologically cut off from the lake by the railway pretty much from the start.
The Decarie trenched expressway did not require "mass demolition of urban neighborhood", only the sinking of an already very large boulevard.


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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 5:26 PM
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Mile End / Kensington
No, Montreal doesn't really have anything like a Kensington Market. On the other hand, Toronto doesn't have a St. Denis.

Queen West = St. Laurent.
Church and Wellesley = Gay Village
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 5:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
That's good. It needed it.



Same difference. The Decarie is arguably more of a blight since it actually involved mass demolition of urban neighbourhoods, and physically cutting NDG off from the rest of the city, whereas the Gardiner only involved the demolition of a few dozen houses. Toronto was always psychologically cut off from the lake by the railway pretty much from the start.
Perhaps but I'd argue that today the areas adjoining Décarie are much more satisfying from an urbanistic perspective than the areas adjacent to the Gardiner.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 6:20 PM
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There's not much of an argument there. It's an apples to oranges comparison unless the insta vertical subdivisions that replaced heavy industries over the last 5 to 40 years in Toronto are suppose to live up to the well established, human scaled neighbourhoods the Decarie split down the middle.
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  #12  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 6:23 PM
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Church and Wellesley = Gay Village
I'd agree for the most part, and there's a lot of back and forth between the two; however, Toronto's Village feels (at least to me) more insular and removed from the hustle and bustle of downtown while Montreal's feels more integrated. Had the centre of gay life in Toronto remained on Yonge, they would probably feel more similar today. A friend once called Church St. "gay Diagon Alley"--you don't get that feeling in Montreal.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 6:32 PM
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I'd agree for the most part, and there's a lot of back and forth between the two; however, Toronto's Village feels (at least to me) more insular and removed from the hustle and bustle of downtown while Montreal's feels more integrated. Had the centre of gay life in Toronto remained on Yonge, they would probably feel more similar today. A friend once called Church St. "gay Diagon Alley"--you don't get that feeling in Montreal.
That's an odd analogy but it's true that the two areas have very different "looks and feels". Sort of a microcosm of the differences between Toronto and Montreal, no?
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 6:32 PM
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The Montreal village benefits from being on a narrower street with more immersive architecture and a continuous street wall of commerces and residential buildings. Church street feels fragmented, with a lesser sense of lieu and its not a very attractive street. They both feel VERY different to me.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 6:37 PM
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One thing that Toronto has that Montreal has no equivalent and that makes me very envious: streetcars. And the lake too, of course. And those skyscrapers everywhere. Damn!
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 7:39 PM
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Sherbrooke/Crescent with Yorkville/Bloor.
St.Catherines with Yonge.
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  #17  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 7:44 PM
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Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
No, Montreal doesn't really have anything like a Kensington Market. On the other hand, Toronto doesn't have a St. Denis.

Queen West = St. Laurent.
Church and Wellesley = Gay Village
Could Bloor west of Yorkville be construed as a St-Denis analogue? Totally different vernacular, but some similar vibes in sections. Or maybe the Danforth?

I don't think there's an exact analogue to Mile End, but the closest would probably be Trinity-Bellwoods and Parkdale.

The Junction is kinda like St-Henri.
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Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 8:16 PM
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One thing that Toronto has that Montreal has no equivalent and that makes me very envious: streetcars. And the lake too, of course. And those skyscrapers everywhere. Damn!
Didn't Montreal sign an order for a whole bunch of LRT (basically streetcars) recently?
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  #19  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 8:54 PM
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In Toronto, I'd say College St. would have been "the Main" in Mordecai Richler's day.
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  #20  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2017, 9:20 PM
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No, Montreal doesn't really have anything like a Kensington Market.
Agreed. I would go as far as saying I have never seen anything like the Kensington Market anywhere. It is a very unique place.
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