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  #81  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2007, 11:56 PM
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Condos in Kenora have been on and off for a decade. Fort Francis has a similar plan and it will pop up every once in a while then die down for a few years. Kenora is growing though, so it might work this time. Here's hoping.

This sounds like a different developer than the last one and he seems to have more experience. Throw in the 6 story hotel downtown and the 11 storey Holiday Inn down the lake and Kenora will have quite the skyline for only 15,000 people.
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  #82  
Old Posted May 9, 2007, 10:01 PM
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I guess I can use this bump to announce that the 100$ million dollar phase one of Prince Arthur's Landing starts this week.. LU still hasn't confirmed it's School of Law and the minor bouts of well spread gentrification continue with little changing results (empty, but pretty, buildings.)

Building permits are up 75% from this time last year, and housing starts are up 75% as well. Thunder Centre is almost finished. Chippewa Park has asked for an additional 15,000% for it's redevelopment project, and Shuniah's wind farms have been approved and will be running in a couple years.

Last edited by vid; May 9, 2007 at 10:12 PM.
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  #83  
Old Posted May 9, 2007, 10:05 PM
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^ Good news, North Bay is also forecasting a very busy construction season this year.

I just noticed today that a white tower crane is up at the new Hospital site. I'll post a pic when I get one.
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  #84  
Old Posted May 11, 2007, 1:52 AM
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Here's a little photo update for North Bay.

The tower crane at the Hospital site taken through the window of a NB transit bus in the rain.


The city's oldest high-school located just outside the downtown is undergoing a major expansion.




Here are some pics of the newly completed transit terminal project!


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  #85  
Old Posted May 11, 2007, 4:33 PM
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OMG Paving stones!

Our "new" terminals just got plain white concrete. *emails images to Transit division*
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  #86  
Old Posted May 19, 2007, 10:05 PM
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Nothing better to do, so I made a map of where things are being built or are going to be built in Thunder Bay. Locations are approximate. Click here to see what the numbers correspond to.

Port Arthur


Intercity


Fort William


-

Major May Street Reconstruction Project Underway

May 17, 2007 – Spring has arrived and with it comes the beginning of construction projects. Work is now underway on one of this season’s major projects that will see extensive upgrades to the infrastructure along May Street from Ridgeway Street to Miles Street.

Preliminary designs for the project were first presented to area businesses at an Open House in the fall of 2006. Since that time property owners, South Core Liaison staff and City staff have been reviewing projects designs and plans.

This one of a kind, $2.5 million dollar project has begun with the closure of May Street from Victoria Avenue to Miles Street earlier this month. Work is underway in this location to replace underground infrastructure originally put in place in the early 1900s. Sanitary sewers, storm sewers, watermains and fire hydrants are all slated for replacement.

Additional project plans include street scaping initiatives to enhance the décor of the south core business area including concrete sidewalks with decorate paving borders and landscaping work that includes boulevard trees and tree pits. Decorative street lighting plans call for the installation of fixtures on both sides of the street to improve illumination in the downtown core. Underground duct and wiring and a rebuild of the traffic signal installation at four intersections will also be completed by the end of the project.

Work is being staged one block at a time. As work proceeds May Street will only be closed to through traffic for one block at a time. To limit any disruption to shoppers, restaurant goers and residents in the area, free parking (two hour restrictions) is provided at city meters within adjacent blocks of May Street, on Violet Street, George Street and Donald Street east of May Street. “We are open for business,” said James Hupka, Chairperson, Victoria Avenue BIA, “the welcome mat is out!”

Visit the Fort William Neighbourhoods’ new site www.thunderbay.ca/fortwilliamneighbourhood to view photos of the project to date and learn more exciting activity in the south core. Watch for month updates on the project.

Last edited by vid; May 22, 2007 at 2:41 AM.
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  #87  
Old Posted May 26, 2007, 8:17 AM
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wow vid you sure went to town on those maps there lol would think it was booming like calgary
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  #88  
Old Posted May 26, 2007, 8:23 AM
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If Calgary included gas stations and corner stores like I did they'd be into the tousands. I barely cracked 70.
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  #89  
Old Posted May 26, 2007, 8:24 AM
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Originally Posted by vid View Post
If Calgary included gas stations and corner stores like I did they'd be into the tousands. I barely cracked 70.

i know thats why i said that
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  #90  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2007, 6:35 AM
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Uh kay.... The flying J truck stop announce their third site plan since 2004, it will require trucks to pull off the highway, onto Oliver road, then on to Burwood road, then into the station, and they would exit the same way. People are opposed to it because this thing is literally being built in a residential area. I want to see a flying J built (this city needs one, with the one on Dawson Road shut down, trucks are now going into the city and sitting at tim hortonses and walmart) but not there. It should be located at the corner of the Thunder Bay expressway and the Shabaqua Highway.

Speaking of which, the Shabaqua Highway just finished it's first layer of paving. One more to go, then they paint the lines and open it up. I just got the new 2007 edition of Maparts Thunder Bay map, and it's included on there. It'll be open by the end of September.

Nipigon's multiply mill will not be rebuilt. The group that is fighting for it is looking for a company that will want to rebuilt, but it's unlikely they'll find one.

The new Marina Park Drive opens in about a week or so, they just finished paving and just have to add grass and touch up the sidewalks. The bandshell will be replaced in time for the Canada Day celebration and the Summer in the Parks series.


4/june

Demolition has begun on the south wind of McIntyre Mall, it will be replaced by an expanded Shoppers Drug Mart.

Expanding of Red River Road to five lanes began today and will be complete by mid September.

The Enterprise Rent a Car at the corner of Central and Memorial is complete. It only took about 3 months to build the thing.

Last edited by vid; Jun 4, 2007 at 9:31 PM.
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  #91  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2007, 9:35 PM
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$87M water plant goes online
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 6/8/2007 5:17:31 PM
http://www.tbsource.com/localnews/index.asp?cid=96854

The taps were officially turned on at the city's new Bare Point Water Treatment Plant Friday.The mayor, members of parliament, city administration, and residents gathered for the grand opening ceremony to celebrate the completion of what many refer to as Thunder Bay's new state-of-the-art facility. The $87 million project will not only improve the city's drinking water, but will also help protect the world's largest fresh water lake.

After years of debate, hours upon hours in council chambers, and endless amounts of work Friday marked a 'monumental step' for the City of Thunder Bay. Since 2004, improvements to the Bare Point plant, which was originally constructed in 1903, have been taking place. Upgrades are in place that brings the plant to world status. Mayor Lynn Peterson says she has been waiting for this day for most of the decade.

Manager of Engineering Pat Mauro, says the new Zeeweed 1000 Version 3 Ultra-Filtration system , allows the city to use less chemicals during the treatment process so the water that will be pumped back into Lake Superior will be of better quality as well.

The improvements allow the plant to process more water per day. From 14 million gallons the production capacity now sits at 25 million gallons going through the treatment plant each day.

A majority of city residences will now be supplied with water from the Bare Point plant, however the Loch Lomond facility is still on-line, expected to be decommissioned at the end of the year.


With this new system, water will be going into Lake Superior cleaner than when it was taken out.

(Bananas added by me)
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  #92  
Old Posted Jun 16, 2007, 3:41 PM
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Any news on those condos in Kenora?
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  #93  
Old Posted Jun 17, 2007, 3:51 AM
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Not that I can find, no. It's a city of 15,000 so things move very slowly, I think their council only meets once a month or something like that.

Since my last update, Thunder Bay has landed a new youth detention centre, a fire training centre, Uncle Franks was scaled down and Days Inn North had it's grand opening -- 56 rooms with expansion options for 40 more in the future.
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  #94  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 3:18 AM
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Here's another blurry pic of the hospital site taken from the bus - only now the first tower crane has been joined by it's big brother!
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  #95  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2007, 5:06 AM
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Optimism in small business report
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 6/20/2007 8:31:02 PM

Call it the report card from small business. The results of a city-wide study were released Wednesday showing how small businesses in Thunder Bay are thinking.Their overall business trade, the community and the economy were among topics discussed in Thunder Bay Ventures' latest Business Opinion Survey and both negative and positive results were posted.

Decreasing population, job layoffs and increasing minimum wage are just a few of the things some small businesses consider significant problems for their business. Thunder Bay Ventures sent out 700 letters and surveys last month to businesses which have 35 employees or less, for their 10th annual city survey. About 130 businesses responded, with their positive or negative opinions, attitudes, comments and suggestions. Thunder Bay Ventures manager Royden Potvin says the results show more optimism than pessimism.

''I think overall, we see a positive trend, it looks like many indicators are indicating that small business think that our economy, in fact, has bottomed out. And there is a glimmer of optimism in the future in this economy. And that ranges from what they see as the sectors that are positive in the future, to their own hiring, and levels of employment within their own business.''

The survey included questions about each operation, Thunder Bay's business climate, and community projects. And under the growth potential heading, Potvin says they separated the primary industry into separate forest and mining sectors this year which he says showed surprising results.

''It looks like small businesses have counted in all the impacts of the layoffs of the forest industry, and the fact that there might not be a significant industry in the future, where they say that the mining industry can be a very important economic driver in our community in the future. So, that's a bit of a surprise to us.''

Businesses identified some of the problems facing them in the past year and at the top of the list are gasoline and fuel oil rates, electricity rates and declining sales. On the other hand, results show some issues are becoming more positive which survey consultant David Smith says is good, but still has room for improvement.

''Some of the trends with regard to economic expectation, hiring expectations, how they feel about the casino, items like that, certainly show a positive trend compared with the last two years.''

Now that the small businesses have given their thoughts and opinions...Potvin says it's up to the community to do something with it. He says they present the data, and hope community leaders take the initiative to address the issues and find solutions to the problems.
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Lakehead board gets $26.6 million for new high school
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 6/22/2007 5:59:58 PM


Thunder Bay is getting $26.6 million to build a new high school to house students from the soon-to-be-closed Hillcrest High School and Port Arthur Collegiate Institute.

The provincial government on Friday made the announcement, to the delight of Lakehead District School Board chairman Ron Oikonen.

“We’re pleased that the Ministry of Education is working with us to meet the needs of these two school communities,” Oikonen said in a release issued by two local MPPs. “This is certainly one very large step in the pathway to meet the needs of our current and future students.”

Thunder Bay-Superior North Liberal MPP Michael Gravelle said the investment will benefit the city for generations to come.

“Once completed, this state-of-the-art facility will give our students the safe and healthy school environment they deserve, while also serving to enhance programming and the value of their educational experience. In addition, the new facility will serve as an important community hub, and its construction will benefit Thunder Bay economically,” Gravelle said.

Fellow MPP Bill Mauro said the new school is needed for secondary education to take the next step in Thunder Bay.

“The ability of our school administrators and local trustees to offer appropriate and comprehensive programming to students will be significantly enhanced by this announcement,” the Thunder Bay-Atikokan Liberal representative said.

“Broad-based programming options are key to providing our students with as much opportunity as possible to succeed in today’s competitive environment.”

The school board has not yet announced the exact location of the unnamed new school, but on Thursday it was learned that Lakehead University had once again put a land swap offer on the table to the board.

The deal would see 16.5 acres of university property, located on the southeast corner of the campus, transferred to the board in exchange for PACI
.
The parcel of land the school may be built on is not near restaurants, it is not near many homes, it is not pedestrian friendly at all, it is not on a bus route. The LU property is really the last place a school should be built. :/ Thankfully, I'm out of school now. Going to a school located down there would be a pain in the ass.

Quote:
Signs of life for PACI
By Sarah Elizabeth Brown | Thursday, June 21, 2007


Lakehead University president Fred Gilbert sits outside PACI on Thursday.

Port Arthur Collegiate Institute may continue on as a school, but for university students.
Lakehead University and the Lakehead District School Board are in discussions to swap the venerable high school for a 16-acre piece of land on the university‘s southeast corner, close to Riverside Drive.
The university is eyeing the stately, nearly 100-year-old building to house its “considerably” cramped education faculty, fine arts program or possibly a new law school.
The public school board is closing the high school at the end of this school year.
In return, the university land could be home to a high school, among other possible uses, director of education Terry Ellwood said Thursday.
The education faculty has run out of space for offices and classrooms in the Bora Laskin Building, said university president Fred Gilbert.
The entire education faculty would not likely move to PACI, but some parts of the professional, one-year teaching program might move downtown, though that‘s up to the faculty, said Gilbert.
Visual arts and music departments have said they‘re interested in PACI, and athletics could use the high school‘s gym.
If the law school comes to fruition, that would be a lovely place for it,” he added.
So far the offer is on the table and discussions are in the early stages, Gilbert said.
“We think that it‘s a nice opportunity to ensure that PACI is a good, productive piece of property in a key part of the city,” he said. “Beautiful building too – it would be a shame to see it become derelict.”
Lakehead University Student Union president Richard Longtin said PACI has always looked like a law school should.
Added Ellwood: “All you‘ve got to do is get a little more ivy growing up the walls.”


Unlike a proposed three-way land swap involving the board, university and Thunder Bay Country Club that died in February 2006 after city council refused a rezoning request needed to make the deal happen, the Lakehead University Student Union is cautiously optimistic about the latest idea.
The school board was looking to build a high school with a capacity of about 1,100 students, approximately the same size or smaller than its current high schools.

Gilbert notified the student union about the discussions a week ago, said Longtin.
“Obviously with the result of the last situation, I wouldn‘t imagine that they would be so secretive this time around, that they would try to get students on board from the very beginning,” Longtin said.
Some university students and residents loudly opposed the previous three-party swap because the land in question was next to student residences and included the McIntyre River, causing environmental concerns and fears students‘ outdoor laboratory would be destroyed. Aboriginal students‘ sweat lodge was also on the land in question.
Those aren‘t concerns with the latest plan
, said Longtin.
He and Gilbert describe the 16 acres under discussion as unused scrub. The property doesn‘t include wetlands or streams.
As well, said Longtin, the concern that university students housed at PACI would be cut off from the main campus isn‘t as acute since a cheap bus pass for all university students has been approved by the city.
There will be in-camera discussions when property details come up, but the public should know discussions have started, said Ellwood.
“We certainly recognize that . . . we need to be transparent with our school and Lakehead U communities,” he said. “It‘s about making sure people know where we‘re going.”
The 16-acre property is zoned major institutional, so re-zoning would be unnecessary, said Ellwood.
The board still has to satisfy questions about services like sewer and water.
“From our perspective, this piece of property is something that could be for future use, including the possibility of a new high school,” he said. “It could include other things as well.
“If we go ahead with a new high school, this is one of the locations that we would be looking at.”

This land-swap proposal is preferable because it doesn‘t involve land that students use, said Longtin.
The only reservation for the student union is putting a high school so close to university residences, he said. Having young teens mixing with university-age students and more people near the university student residences were two concerns in early 2006.
But there are many positives this time around, he said, from more space for cramped faculties to more people downtown spending money in local businesses.
I have been saying all along that the PACI building would be a wonderful addition to LU, and the gym could have a second use as a community centre as well.
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  #96  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2007, 8:39 AM
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Here are a couple of new pics of the nearly completed Holiday Inn suites project in North Bay. Now I'm looking forward for construction to start on the adjacent 83 unit "Staybridge Inn" Suites Hotel, it will be directly beside the Holiday Inn and will be 5 or 6 storeys tall.



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  #97  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2007, 12:14 AM
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New mill offers stability to Atikokan
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 6/27/2007 5:46:55 PM

There is a new sense of optimism in the community of Atikokan with the provincial announcement of a wood allocation for a new value-added mill in the community.

There is no doubt that this is a big deal for Atikokan. Mayor Dennis Brown says it is the most uplifting news for the community in years.

After months of waiting, MPP Bill Mauro was in the community to make it official this week. Superior Laminated Lumber was the successful proponent for the White birch wood supply in the area. Mauro says this proposal was selected for a number of reasons but chief among them was that their plan would utilize the entire log.

For Mike Shusterman, the official announcement was surreal, the idea of a laminated veneer lumber facility in the northwest is one he has worked on since 1999. There were many peaks and valleys he says but after getting the wood supply, anything's possible.

It is expected that construction could begin next spring on the new mill meaning roughly 200 construction jobs alone. And with the site being adjacent to Fibratech, there will be plenty of synergies between the two companies.

This announcement is expected to significantly stabilize the economy of Atikokan adding vigor to the tax base and becoming one of the community's largest employers with roughly 180 new jobs when it opens.
Good news for Atikokan.
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  #98  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2007, 2:29 AM
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Kids on the move following closure of 3 schools
By Sarah Elizabeth Brown | Tuesday, July 3, 2007

The Lakehead District School Board‘s newest elementary school has 110 more students than projected, and is nearing its capacity before opening in September.
The majority are coming from the growing neighbourhood around Woodcrest School, said superintendent of education Sherri-Lynne Pharand.
However, some school council chairwomen suggest predictions are off as a result of parents opting to drive their kids to out-of-zone schools.
Each school has a catchment area, and students living within that zone are expected to attend that school. However, if there is room, students can go to any other school provided their families provide transportation.
Woodcrest, with a capacity of 469, has 441 students registered so far.
It was projected to have 329 by now, but with more building in the neighbourhood north of the Expressway than expected, registrations have climbed, including some from the Catholic board, Pharand said Tuesday.
At this point, the board has to be cautious about accepting more out-of-zone registrants, Pharand told trustees at their last board meeting June 26.
The board closed three elementary schools in the north end – Balsam Street, Sir John A. Macdonald and Forest Park – in June. Students from those schools who live north of the Expressway are zoned for Woodcrest, while those living south of the expressway are zoned for C.D. Howe, Vance Chapman and Algonquin, respectively.
However, school council chairwoman Sheila Stewart said Balsam kids are headed to seven different schools.
Sir John A. Macdonald kids are headed to at least six.
Pharand said some students who live south of the Expressway have opted to go outside their zone to Woodcrest in order to attend school with their friends.
Woodcrest‘s day-care, which provides child care up to age 12, has attracted others.
Exact numbers, and where they‘re coming from, won‘t be really known until September, Pharand said.
South of the Expressway, some schools are close to projections while others “have transferred around a little.”
At C.D. Howe, 130 students are expected in September, “a huge drop” from the 180 or so who attended for 2006-07, said school council chairwoman Keri Maki.
Parents are concerned because every class from Grade 1 to Grade 6 is a split-level class, due largely to the province‘s requirement that primary classes be capped at 20 students, said Maki.
“A lot of the parental concern is that because we do have low numbers, that in another couple of years they‘re going to turn around and look at us” for closure due to low student numbers.
Pharand noted strong kindergarten numbers are a positive sign for that school‘s viability. Some of the older students have transferred elsewhere, she said.
C.D. Howe families were preparing for their school to close when it was taken off the list this past winter and switched from a junior kindergarten to Grade 8 school to a JK to Grade 6 facility.
The board kept the school open after receiving money from the province for a new day-care there.
But while C.D. Howe was on the chopping block, families at Balsam School were getting used to the idea that they were headed to Vance Chapman, said Stewart.
Even after C.D. Howe was kept open and the zones changed again, some families – about 30 kids – decided they‘re going to Vance Chapman anyway, Stewart said.
At the last meeting of the board committee that oversees integration of various closing schools into their new facilities, communications officer Bruce Nugent told trustees most calls he‘d received were from parents of current Balsam Street School students about transportation. The callers had said they would prefer that their kids go to Vance Chapman or Algonquin rather than C.D. Howe.
The problem, in some parents‘ eyes, is because C.D. Howe no longer has grades 7 and 8, it will split up some siblings as the older ones head off to Algonquin.
The board limited grades 7 and 8 to four north-end schools to create masses of students large enough to hire specialized teachers in math, science and art, as well as build science labs.
“It‘s just too much movement for families,” Maki said about students moving from C.D. Howe to Algonquin for two years and then on to high school.
While Maki said she knows of “just a handful” of C.D. Howe families who‘ve opted to drive their children to Algonquin school, Stewart said at Balsam it‘s a larger concern.
“There‘s even some with just one child who are saying, ’I want (kindergarten) to Grade 8.‘ They just don‘t want change and transition.‘‘
Stewart also suspects some families are driving to Woodcrest because it‘s a brand new school.
“It‘s a real opinion out there that for some reason, that K-6 is just not a good plan,” Stewart said. “It sounds too complicated to people.”
While she can‘t put a number to families bypassing C.D. Howe next year, Stewart said the feeling is “a very strong one” against splitting siblings and shuffling kids from C.D. Howe to Algonquin or Woodcrest, and then to high school in a matter of three years.
Maki and her husband considered moving their three children to Algonquin, though their younger children have opted to stay at C.D. Howe for now. In two years, all three will be in different schools.
Distance – Algonquin means crossing Red River Road and River Street – is also a concern for Balsam parents, said Stewart.
For some Balsam families, Vance Chapman is part of their community, while further-afield Algonquin isn‘t.
While Maki said she doesn‘t think it‘s a bad thing that the school board is trying to accommodate families‘ school choices, another part of her thinks if a plan for zoned schools was made, the board should stick with it.
“It just seems very muddled right now,” she said.
http://maps.google.ca/maps?ie=UTF8&o...&t=k&z=16&om=0

The school is located just to the west of those two large buildings. A huge area there has been cleared out for the school and another subdivision. Everything that Google Earth shows in this areas is finished.
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  #99  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2007, 6:39 PM
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Solar power project planned for city
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 7/5/2007 2:35:04 PM
http://www.tbsource.com/localnews/index.asp?cid=97662

A Toronto-based company has announced a significant energy investment in Thunder Bay that could create 50 construction jobs.

SkyPower Corporation has announced it is building a 10 megawatt solar project off Bowlker Road near Broadway Avenue south of the airport. Thunder Bay Hydro will play a key role in the plans Hydro president Rob Mace said Thursday, citing many reasons why the city was a good choice for the park that is one of the first solar energy operations of its kind in Canada.

Thunder Bay Hydro will be SkyPower's distributor of the solar energy and under the Ontario Power Authority's standard offer agreement, Skypower has been given a 20 year power purchase agreement. Mayor Lynn Peterson says she is thrilled that Thunder Bay will be home to the solar farm.

The solar park will generate enough green renewable energy to displace 9,500 metric tonnes of carbon emissions annually within the region. It is expected to be up and running by the end of the year.
The city recently altered it's classification of industrial zones to make development of green energy more attractive. This won't be the last project of it's kind in the Lakehead city. Additionally, Thunder Bay is the sunniest city in Eastern Canada.

Quote:
Rock the Fort wins national tourism award
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 7/5/2007 2:04:52 PM
http://www.tbsource.com/Localnews/index.asp?cid=97657

As the annual Bluesfest gets set to begin in the city more honours have been heaped on another local outdoor festival, one that is in hiatus.

Officials from Fort William Historical Park were in Toronto earlier this week to receive a Ministry of Tourism Award for the 2006 version of its 'Rock the Fort' festival. The Discovery Award for Best Practices is based on the implementation of a creative concept that results in a positive impact for the ministry. The event drew about 45,000 patrons over three days, generating an estimated $3.5 million in economic activity for area businesses. Rock the Fort 2006 also was named the Best National Event of the Year by the Tourism Industry Association of Canada.

Fort officials made the decision to suspend the event in order to concentrate on repairs required to buildings at the historical park following last year's flood damage.
Aside from the Fort damage, (They built the damn thing in a flood plain!) last year's festival had a problem with underage drinking. It was all ages but beer was sold openly and allowable throughout the entire site, they used coloured wrist bands to identify ages, but that resulted in older people buying beer for younger ones. They will likely use a beer garden next year.

Quote:
Waterfront plan will attract investors
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 7/5/2007 8:25:18 PM
http://www.tbsource.com/localnews/index.asp?cid=97672

Pieces of the puzzle continue to fall into place for the new Waterfront Development Committee and the first concrete signs of activity will take place this summer.

Private investment is a key element of the plan and when its complete, Waterfront development committee chair, Mark Bentz says, it's going to be an extremely successful and profitable place for the private sector to have a stake in.

Since the grand unveiling of the master plan in March council has stood behind the vision and the implementation phase has begun at Marina Park. Just over 50 per cent of the $100 million Waterfront master plan price tag is expected to come from the private sector with the proposed hotel and two condominiums on the southside of Marina Park being privately owned.

Bentz says the private sector has been engaged in the plan since day one, and although no commitment has been made yet, he knows it will be there when the time comes.

Bentz says with landfill left to do and some zoning issues to take care of, he doesn't expect any construction of the buildings to occur for the next year.

Visually residents will be able to see parts of the plan come to life this summer with the skateboard plaza being built along with the overall expansion of the Marina.
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Last edited by vid; Jul 6, 2007 at 9:00 AM.
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Old Posted Jul 10, 2007, 9:26 PM
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Surge continues in housing starts
Tb News Source | Web Posted: 7/10/2007 1:35:50 PM
http://www.tbsource.com/Localnews/index.asp?cid=97825

New home starts in the city continue a strong run as they are up for the third month in a row.

Canada Mortgage and Housing says there were 33 new single detached starts in Thunder Bay last month. That's more than double the 16 home starts recorded in June 2006. It also brings total starts for the year to 77, up from 46 at the same point last year, a 67 per cent increase.

Its an unexpected jump in home starts and analyst Warren Philp said Tuesday that the resale market is often not satisfying demand which may be driving the desire to build new homes. He says home starts all year have been above expected numbers and in his view a slumping resale market is the main factor for increase in starts. He says resale listings have fallen to levels not seen since 1989.

CMHC also says the number of building permits issued also indicate the strong performance is likely to continue. Eighty permits have been issued so far this year which is up from the 44 issued for the first six months of 2006.
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