HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Atlantic Provinces > Halifax > Halifax Peninsula & Downtown Dartmouth


    Skye Halifax I in the SkyscraperPage Database

Building Data Page   • Comparison Diagram   • Halifax Skyscraper Diagram

Map Location

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #881  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2019, 7:15 AM
pblaauw pblaauw is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 470
Demolishing a few errant rosebushes won't take that long.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #882  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2019, 7:34 PM
MolteN MolteN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Halifax
Posts: 12
I'm happy to see this approved, I can understand the criticism regarding the bland look of the structure. Imho it seems like a post modernist take on brutalism style architecture to a degree. But there are still a lot of vacant lots in downtown and the south end that are prime real estate for mixed use towers. Parking lots of Queen ST sobeys or the superstore lot at Barrington & Hollis. Parking lot between Dresden Row & Birmingham St. Big lot right behind the new library of spring garden road. So many places so many ideas.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #883  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2019, 8:35 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 22,122
A lot of people seem to imagine that if you filter out the bad stuff, good stuff will get through or the developers will come back with better proposals and the end result will be better.

I don't think this is completely wrong; there's some really bad stuff that should be weeded out. But I think that building a healthy development scene and dense downtown are much more important, and to do that you have to let developers build, make money, cultivate talent, and iterate on their designs. Without that you will never get good economically viable proposals. This has clearly happened in Halifax since the 1990's when the quality of development was far below what it is today.

Another factor that HRM by Design and the Centre Plan have contributed to is that there aren't many true landmark buildings permitted. So the stakes are pretty low on just about any proposal. That wasn't the case with the 48-storey version of Skye, but the 21 storey towers are just another development that will be part of rows of towers along Sackville and Hollis.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #884  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2019, 9:02 PM
Takeo Takeo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Halifax
Posts: 572
Quote:
Originally Posted by MolteN View Post
I'm happy to see this approved, I can understand the criticism regarding the bland look of the structure. Imho it seems like a post modernist take on brutalism style architecture to a degree. But there are still a lot of vacant lots in downtown and the south end that are prime real estate for mixed use towers. Parking lots of Queen ST sobeys or the superstore lot at Barrington & Hollis. Parking lot between Dresden Row & Birmingham St. Big lot right behind the new library of spring garden road. So many places so many ideas.
I’m not seeing even a hint of Post-Modernism or Brutalism but I think I understand what you were trying to say. The podium at least is pure International Style. I like it. I’d like to see more of the tower above.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #885  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 6:52 AM
pblaauw pblaauw is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 470
The podium blends in well with the Centennial Building across the street.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #886  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 1:00 PM
IanWatson IanWatson is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 869
It seems like "Brutalism" has become the common shorthand for "bland, oppressive building". It's understandable confusion given the "brutal" in the name, but it's also a shame because there are a lot of very wonderful true Brutalist buildings that tend to get dismissed and ignored/allowed to be demolished because of society's aversion to the idea of the name.

McMansion Hell is making an effort (bit of a long read) to set the record straight, which I really appreciate. I'm looking forward to the third post in the series.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #887  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 4:38 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 22,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by IanWatson View Post
McMansion Hell is making an effort (bit of a long read) to set the record straight, which I really appreciate. I'm looking forward to the third post in the series.
Another one you hear is "Stalinist" which might actually be applied to what could correct be referred to as brutalist buildings. Stalin commissioned lots of neoclassical 1930's type buildings. He died in 1953 before the 60's styles really took off. Buildings like Scotia Square and Fenwick are not Stalinist.

I like that McMansion Hell article but the Vitra Conference Center is an odd example to choose if the goal is to clearly delineate the style. The brutalism misappropriation is very simple. As they say it came from French but was misunderstood in English because "brut" in "béton brut" is a false cognate; it looks like an English word with a different meaning. This is much simpler than the question who was really part of the architectural "movement" or not. Architects and architecture historians seem prone to getting in the weeds a lot over these historical trends and movements/philosophies instead of just focusing on how a building is constructed. You might get average people to understand that "brutalist" doesn't mean "brutal" but they're not going to remember which movement Le Corbusier was participating in when he designed a particular building in raw concrete.

We are living through the mass extinction of 1950's and 60's architecture right now, just as cities unwisely demolished all kinds of valuable early 20th century architecture in the 1960's.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #888  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2019, 6:18 PM
eastcoastal eastcoastal is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
It's only partially covered. They have some diagrams in the DRC document. It's more like a pedway running between the two towers that will cover maybe 40% of the depth of the block...
Thanks for the details - I missed that.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Atlantic Provinces > Halifax > Halifax Peninsula & Downtown Dartmouth
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:25 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.