HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Portland > Transportation & Infrastructure

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2011, 1:56 AM
Shilo Rune 96's Avatar
Shilo Rune 96 Shilo Rune 96 is offline
PearlHelp.com
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: SE Portland
Posts: 334
Portland Parking

Portland will test pay-by-phone street parking starting in August


Photo courtesy of The Oregonian.

An Atlanta company bets Portland residents and visitors will pay more to park if it means greater convenience.

Starting next month, Pearl District drivers will test technology that allows people to pay for street parking with a cell phone. No more walking to the meter in the middle of the block. No more fishing out coins or a credit card while juggling a toddler and an umbrella. And no more messy window stickers.

Instead, a few taps on a cell phone will authorize a credit card payment of the meter rate -- plus a 35-cent fee. And if your time is running out while you sit in a meeting or finish some shopping? Just pull out your phone and, for another 35 cents, add more.

The 3-year-old system, by Atlanta company Parkmobile, is already running in about 100 U.S. jurisdictions. Parkmobile will offer it in the Pearl for 90 days. If it catches on -- as it did in Washington, D.C., this summer -- the program could expand to other parts of Portland.

Read the full article here....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2011, 2:02 AM
Shilo Rune 96's Avatar
Shilo Rune 96 Shilo Rune 96 is offline
PearlHelp.com
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: SE Portland
Posts: 334
I still thought parking on the same side of the street for longer than the stated time (on the sign) was illegal! Yikes, I've been making more work for myself.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2011, 2:11 AM
65MAX's Avatar
65MAX 65MAX is offline
Karma Police
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: People's Republic of Portland
Posts: 2,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shilo Rune 96 View Post
I still thought parking on the same side of the street for longer than the stated time (on the sign) was illegal! Yikes, I've been making more work for myself.
It is. I think what they meant to say is IF you haven't already maxed out your time, you can remotely add more time to your meter.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2012, 12:37 AM
tworivers's Avatar
tworivers tworivers is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Portland/Cascadia
Posts: 2,510
Portland Parking

You all will appreciate this post from Price Tags.
Based off this thread here on SSP.

Although, in fairness, a number of the "parking lots" shown in Portland are actually just vacant parcels of land.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2012, 11:36 PM
Derek's Avatar
Derek Derek is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,438
The artist(s) should've done some more research to separate empty lots from parking lots (at least for the article, since that's what it's about), but still a cool article.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2012, 4:33 PM
MarkDaMan's Avatar
MarkDaMan MarkDaMan is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Portland
Posts: 6,902

Initial designs of the new five-story Payne Apartments slated for North Williams Avenue and Beech. Courtesy of Boise Neighborhood Association

City study finds increase in no-parking apartments but little neighborhood parking impact
Elliot Njus, The Oregonian
on November 08, 2012 at 6:00 AM, updated November 08, 2012 at 6:09 AM

http://www.oregonlive.com/front-porc...rease_in.html#

Quote:
A city of Portland study released Wednesday plays down the effect of no-parking apartment buildings on nearby residential neighborhoods, but it acknowledges a recent boom in apartment construction may have thrown off the balance that had kept such projects in check.

In a surge of new projects driven by a low rental vacancy rate, rising rents and a struggling market for single-family homes, developers have built or proposed nearly two dozen apartment projects with no off-street car parking.

Neighbors reacted swiftly, complaining to the city and organizing opposition to some projects. Grievances have included the height and character of the buildings, but parking emerged as a primary and shared complaint.

This week's report -- based on permit data, studies of on-street parking availability, a survey of 116 apartment residents and a parking cost analysis -- will serve as the guiding document in a public forum to be held Tuesday before the city Planning and Sustainability Commission.

The central question, Portland Chief Planner Joe Zehnder says, is how to balance neighborhood livability with the city's goals of increasing density and reducing automobile use.

Among the findings:

Most new apartments include parking. About 55 percent of new buildings, representing 68 percent of units, included some parking.

Apartment buildings proposed in 2011 and 2012 include less parking per unit than those from 2006-2008.

Near eight existing apartments on commercial corridors, some with off-street parking and some without, the city reports adequate on-street parking within one or two blocks.

Among residents of those buildings who responded to a survey, 72 percent owned cars, and two-thirds of car owners park on the street. But only 36 percent use a car for a daily commute.

Residents of no-parking apartment buildings aren't less likely to own a car.

All else being equal, adding parking could increase $800 in monthly rent to $850 a month for a tuck-under parking structure or to $1,300 a month for underground parking. The estimate assumes a 7 percent return on investment and that adding parking adds cost while reducing the number of rent-producing units.

The study suggests that although developers have been allowed to build apartments without off-street parking since the mid-1980s in parts of the city, previous development typically included parking because lenders would insist upon it. But that's changed in recent years.

The public forum will be from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tuesday in city offices at 1900 S.W. Fourth Ave., room 2500A.

–Elliot Njus
__________________
make paradise, tear up a parking lot
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2012, 10:58 PM
zilfondel zilfondel is offline
Submarine de Nucléar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 4,465
Haha, Oregonlive redid the above article. Its even the same author - 2 days later:

Changing attitudes by developers and lenders drive no-parking apartment surge in Portland
By Elliot Njus, The Oregonian
on November 10, 2012 at 2:00 PM, updated November 12, 2012 at 10:35 AM

http://www.oregonlive.com/front-porc...anging_at.html


Quote:
There's been a surge in new apartment construction this year, and many of the proposals are targeted at that Portlandia ideal -- ditching the car and walking, biking or taking transit to work.

Until recently, developments without resident parking were legal but rare, reined in by the profit-seeking sensibilities of developers and their lenders. Now, more than two dozen such apartment have been proposed or recently built in Portland.
__________________
Portland Bike Bridge traffic:

2009 - 15,749 | 2010 - 17,576 | 2011 - 18,257 | 2012 - 18,794
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2013, 2:13 PM
cab cab is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,448
Bad decisions continue. By adding in minimum parking requirements, they just trashed the streetscape of most infill buildings and increased costs. The city and leadership are really on the downturn when it comes to planning. So sad. What the F happened?

Commissioners approve minimum parking requirements for new apartments
Portland apartment projects planned without parking that do not yet have a building permit may soon have to go back to the drawing board.

The Planning and Sustainability Commission on Tuesday voted to approve zoning code amendments that would require apartment projects with more than 40 units to include a minimum amount of parking. The vote followed more than three hours of public testimony from concerned residents; some contended that the amendments did not go far enough, and others said they went too far.

http://djcoregon.com/news/2013/03/13...ew-apartments/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2013, 5:38 PM
zilfondel zilfondel is offline
Submarine de Nucléar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 4,465
No kidding. I thought the city of Portland was going to follow a fundamentally different path than San Francisco and Seattle. Apparently not. I'm predicting we will have similar unaffordability as those cities as the city council clamps down on infill development and turns their ear to the NIMBY element.

Livability issues will be compounded as our average income is far less than SEA and SFO. Umm... I wonder if this new ordinance bans any new dorm construction in the city? As dorms generally don't include parking, such as the ~950 bed dorm "University Pointe" downtown?
__________________
Portland Bike Bridge traffic:

2009 - 15,749 | 2010 - 17,576 | 2011 - 18,257 | 2012 - 18,794
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2013, 6:38 PM
2oh1's Avatar
2oh1 2oh1 is offline
9-7-2oh1-!
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: downtown Portland
Posts: 2,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by cab View Post
Bad decisions continue. By adding in minimum parking requirements, they just trashed the streetscape of most infill buildings and increased costs. The city and leadership are really on the downturn when it comes to planning. So sad. What the F happened?
EXACTLY. What happened?!?!? A better solution would be to issue a limited number of parking permits, and when they're gone, you can get on a waiting list. Since the waiting list for new residents would probably grow pretty long, it would encourage people who aren't car-free to look elsewhere.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2013, 8:26 PM
cab cab is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,448
"The Planning and Sustainability Commission" You'd think these people would be the best and brightest in sustainable growth.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2013, 4:35 AM
tworivers's Avatar
tworivers tworivers is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Portland/Cascadia
Posts: 2,510
Quote:
cab: So sad. What the F happened?
Quote:
2oh1: EXACTLY. What happened?!?!?
All we can do is hope that the current swing of the pendulum --towards mediocrity and reaction-- is brief.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2013, 4:42 AM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 690
There was quite a bit of push from some very coordinated neighbors from Division Street. Unfortunately, the squeaky wheel gets the grease.

I submitted written testimony to the Planning and Sustainability Commission, but that didn't achieve much. Neither did having former Metro Councilor Rex Burkholder or a dozen other prominent transportation and land use planners. I'm going to call the City Council members individually to try to do some damage control. This is so ridiculous. I feel like I'm living in some alternate universe - It's like I never left Los Angeles
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2013, 3:45 PM
twofiftyfive twofiftyfive is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 156
You can read Chris Smith's justification for his vote at his Portland Transport blog. Apparently it was to keep City Council from creating something even worse.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2013, 1:47 AM
philopdx philopdx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 1,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by twofiftyfive View Post
You can read Chris Smith's justification for his vote at his Portland Transport blog. Apparently it was to keep City Council from creating something even worse.
I admire the fact that he is rationally and dispassionately explaining his point of view. He's even responding to comments. What a class act.

This is a far cry from Oregon Live's comment section, that usually goes something like this: "LOOT RAIL! OBUMBA IS A SOCIOLOGIST RICHARD MARX!!".
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2014, 4:06 PM
bvpcvm bvpcvm is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Portland
Posts: 2,707
Parking lot tax?

This could be great for eliminating all those empty lots downtown.

Controversial Portland parking-lot tax on agenda for April 21 planning meeting

Quote:
City planners expect a big discussion about a potential parking lot tax at a meeting April 21 for the West Quadrant advisory committee, a group of business owners and others interested in the future of downtown.

As part of the effort, planners are also weighing other notable options, such as eliminating or reconfiguring one or both ramps feeding the Morrison Bridge, tweaking building height limitations and promoting a 10-mile “green loop” around the central city.

But the parking lot tax has emerged as one of, if not, the most controversial concepts within the West Quadrant, which stretches from the Pearl to South Waterfront districts.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2014, 7:19 PM
cab cab is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,448
Oh man that would be a game changer. Just make it surface parking lot. Divide and conquer the parking lot barons. The design requirements of buildings will keep the built structure in check. The surface spots are the larger problem. This is huge!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2014, 7:54 PM
maccoinnich maccoinnich is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Portland
Posts: 6,112
Good. Sounds like a simplified version of land value taxation, which I really wish we would adopt.
__________________
"Maybe to an architect, they might look suspicious, but to me, they just look like rocks"

www.twitter.com/maccoinnich
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2014, 10:13 PM
2oh1's Avatar
2oh1 2oh1 is offline
9-7-2oh1-!
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: downtown Portland
Posts: 2,228
I wonder what impact this would have on food carts. I'm for just about anything that gets surface parking lots developed, but any lot that remains as parking will pass the cost of a tax on to drivers and, yes, food carts.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2014, 11:17 PM
urbanlife's Avatar
urbanlife urbanlife is offline
A before E
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Milwaukie, Oregon
Posts: 10,920
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2oh1 View Post
I wonder what impact this would have on food carts. I'm for just about anything that gets surface parking lots developed, but any lot that remains as parking will pass the cost of a tax on to drivers and, yes, food carts.
That is true, Portland is a unique city with the fact that most cities that have surface parking lots have dead zones, but in Portland a surface parking lot can easily mean a food cart mecca. I really hope the city is able to find a balance between developing surface lots and maintaining the food cart culture in downtown.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Portland > Transportation & Infrastructure
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 6:32 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.