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  #3181  
Old Posted May 28, 2013, 9:56 PM
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Good question but it would make sense if that is the plan. I have always been lukewarm on the design of this building. A box more like Four World Trade Center would look better in the complex.
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  #3182  
Old Posted May 29, 2013, 5:46 PM
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At this rate, the neighboring trees may rise faster than this tower.
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  #3183  
Old Posted May 30, 2013, 12:18 AM
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Uggghhh what happened to those talks they were in to get this thing going I thought they were close to a deal.
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  #3184  
Old Posted May 30, 2013, 3:06 AM
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Nobody ever said with any absolute certainty--either in this forum or with respect to anyone else involved in this whole process--that any deal was imminent.

Yes, there have been rumblings; but unfortunately, I share your concern that it's all they turned out to be. Sometimes our hopes get a bit too high and reality comes along and takes a honking dump in the punchbowl. Frequent spikes and letdowns of this kind are bound to happen. Many such episodes relating to all of WTC II's buildings have, and will continue to do so till we arrive at a happy conclusion to this infuriating saga. It's that simple, and a rather uncomfortable reality that we all are forced to deal with, especially in this economically dicey climate.

The concept of giving things time must be put to the test here. It's not as if Mr. Silverstein has only a month to find a tenant or anything; so I don't harbor any immediate sense of urgency. Come year's end and nothing's been inked? Okay. Then I'll start worrying.

For those of you relatively to my postings, here's something to keep in mind...and BTW this is by way of reminder for those of you who recall what I'm about to say.

Think of the famous catchphrase in the film "Field of Dreams". "If you build it, they will come." In the case of these two remaining towers, it's in what I'd call "non-negative reverse":

"If they come, you will build it." What this means I shall explain below.

AT least one major tenant will find this tower and anchor it, provided that neither the West Side, nor Madison Avenue (long shot), nor 57th Street (longer shot) are chosen as the company's preferred areas in which to do business. That's a guarantee. Once that happens, the demand will--again, I guarantee you--spur the continued building up of this tower. And as NYguy told me in another post elsewhere, once this tower starts up, 2WTC is almost certain to follow.

Last edited by JayPro; May 30, 2013 at 3:30 AM.
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  #3185  
Old Posted May 30, 2013, 10:25 PM
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This tower will attract a lead tenant eventually.
The West Side seems to be doing a better job at attracting long-term leases.

It seems as if people just don't want to work at the dreadful "Ground-Zero" due to the past.

I am hopeful that all of the WTC complex attracts corporations.
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  #3186  
Old Posted May 30, 2013, 10:47 PM
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I never considered that. If that's the case, Mr Silverstein's PR corps had better start ramping up on squleching whatever apprehensions yet remain.
I mean...it *is* a legitimate thought; but IMO the rather slim odds of a 9-11 style attack in this exact same area happening again need to be reinforced. Gun-shyness is an honest feeling to come by in these situations; but the can be dealt with.
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  #3187  
Old Posted May 30, 2013, 10:59 PM
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WTC 3 is a very attractive tower.
There is absolutely no reason whatsoever why anyone wouldn't want to work there!

You get a great new plaza, a state of the art transit hub, first class shopping and dining and outstanding views!

C'mon people, Larry is waiting for you!
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  #3188  
Old Posted May 31, 2013, 1:15 AM
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I tend to believe that part of what makes landing a tenant here challenging is the simple truth that Downtown does not attract firms, particularly financials, the way it used to - Midtown remains the dominant and preferable business center.

Despite that comment, I remain optimistic that something will breakthrough with this property.
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  #3189  
Old Posted May 31, 2013, 1:33 PM
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Some facade?

©tectonic
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  #3190  
Old Posted May 31, 2013, 1:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapatan View Post
Apparently it won't be that tall either...
Where did the 1080 figure for the roof come from anyway?
At 1,080 ft, it would be taller to roof than all but the Freedom Tower and Empire State in NY at this point, although that is changing fast. That is the height to the top of the parapet,
as given by the Port Authority. The "spires" are what will make the height higher.



Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC GUY View Post
Uggghhh what happened to those talks they were in to get this thing going I thought they were close to a deal.
Close in terms of commercial real estate leasing is not what you are thinking. This plays out over time. It could be a couple of years before a particular tenant decides on moving
to a new headquarters. But if Silverstein is "close" to signing a tenant, he will get it before this year runs out. I suspect that Time Warner will be moving to Related's north tower
(a decision should come in June), taking one more player off the board. There are a number of options planned for tenants seeking newly built office space, but in the matter of time,
very few options.



usc_ty

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  #3191  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2013, 3:18 PM
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Why have 2 and 3 WTC not received minimum funding yet? There are towers in Midtown that are up to hundreds of feet taller than these two buildings, but for some reason people do not want to do business with these beautiful buildings? I mean, most of the groundwork is done already, so having to wait for a long construction period isn't a problem. I have waited for years for these buildings to start construction. I used to think 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 WTC and the Transportation Hub would be under construction AT THE SAME TIME. How incredible that would look! Now I doubt that these buildings will ever start
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  #3192  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2013, 7:36 PM
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Because the location for these kinds of companies is horrible. They want to be in Midtown because it's more central and convenient, and because everyone else is there.

The FiDi's doom was sealed by Sandy, too. Sea level change will make the neighborhood increasingly vulnerable, and large companies can't take the risk of being flooded out of their offices.
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  #3193  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2013, 7:45 PM
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I truly appreciate your concern; so I would respectfully draw your attention to a few posts up in the thread...namely #3184 authored by me (FYI posts are numbered at the upper right-hand corner of the message).

I more or less explained things as they are right now in a way that I hope will answer some of your questions. But unfortunately, funding just doesn't happen out of the blue.

It also could be, as touched on by a fellow poster in this thread, that a lot of potential takers remain gun-shy all the way back from 9-11. IMO it's up to SIlverstein's public relations staff, the New York/New Jersey Port Authority and the WTC's engineers to convince any remaining doubters that these buildings will, from bedrock to pinnacle, receive the dual benefits of the latest construction technologies and most demanding safety benchmarks on the planet. This is why the business sector is basically snarfing up real estate along the West Side and (increasingly so, it seems to me) Madison Avenue like gangbusters (FYI, the booming 57th Street corridor BTW is almost exclusively residential...BTW exclusive in both senses, i.e. mega-rich only and their mega-ridiculous minimum asking prices).
Point is, they feel safer in MidTown; nevertheless, a bit of reassurances from the appropriate bit players in this whole drama should put quite a few minds at ease.
Once again, it's a matter of playing the waiting game.

Last edited by JayPro; Jun 1, 2013 at 9:05 PM.
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  #3194  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2013, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC GUY View Post
Uggghhh what happened to those talks they were in to get this thing going I thought they were close to a deal.
It was a rumor started by Mayor Bloomberg.
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  #3195  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2013, 8:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post
The FiDi's doom was sealed by Sandy, too. Sea level change will make the neighborhood increasingly vulnerable, and large companies can't take the risk of being flooded out of their offices.
That's why the city needs the Ocean Barrier.
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  #3196  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2013, 1:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPro View Post
I truly appreciate your concern; so I would respectfully draw your attention to a few posts up in the thread...namely #3184 authored by me (FYI posts are numbered at the upper right-hand corner of the message).
What, you expect people to actually read before posting inanities?....




Quote:
Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post
Because the location for these kinds of companies is horrible. They want to be in Midtown because it's more central and convenient, and because everyone else is there.

The FiDi's doom was sealed by Sandy, too. Sea level change will make the neighborhood increasingly vulnerable, and large companies can't take the risk of being flooded out of their offices.
That's not true. While it's true that there will always be companies that would rather be located in Midtown than Downtown, that are always companies that move Downtown from Midtown - in the good times and bad. Midtown has it's own stalled buildings (remember 15 Penn?) Every building has a unique story, and this building will not be effected at all by another sandy.
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  #3197  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2013, 3:53 PM
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Why are so few people commenting on the facade? I think it looks great. Its interesting that they started with the mechanical floors first, but I really like how those black vents look. They will create a nice natural buffer between the finishing and the upcoming parts of this tower.
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  #3198  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2013, 4:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
What, you expect people to actually read before posting inanities?....
LMAO....Got me on that one....
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  #3199  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2013, 9:28 PM
babybackribs2314 babybackribs2314 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
What, you expect people to actually read before posting inanities?....

That's not true. While it's true that there will always be companies that would rather be located in Midtown than Downtown, that are always companies that move Downtown from Midtown - in the good times and bad. Midtown has it's own stalled buildings (remember 15 Penn?) Every building has a unique story, and this building will not be effected at all by another sandy.
Sandy wasn't a worst-case scenario. The point is that climate change seems to be accelerating and rising sea levels combined with more storminess give pause to major companies locating in potential flood zones. What if the surge was 5-feet worse than Sandy; not unimaginable in a worst-case, and something I would say would be likely within the next 50 years?

Big companies plan for long horizons - if there is inherent risk, why bother?
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  #3200  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2013, 11:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post
Sandy wasn't a worst-case scenario. The point is that climate change seems to be accelerating and rising sea levels combined with more storminess give pause to major companies locating in potential flood zones. What if the surge was 5-feet worse than Sandy; not unimaginable in a worst-case, and something I would say would be likely within the next 50 years?

Big companies plan for long horizons - if there is inherent risk, why bother?
It can be argued that there is inherent risk to being anywhere in Manhattan. How many sandy's have we had? What happened was unprecedented enough that the landlords Downtown have invested to make the proper changes necessary so there won't be a repeat of what happened when businesses had to relocate. People had to abandon their residential towers Downtown as well, but has that slowed potential residential development Downtown? Hardly. It's taking longer to lease this particular office space at the WTC for a variety of reasons, but that was the case before hurricane sandy.

Regardless, Silverstein's towers would not have been affected.


http://commercialobserver.com/2013/0...lding-complex/

Marketing the World: Silverstein Properties’ Jeremy Moss on Leasing the Country’s Most Conspicuous Building Complex




Mr. Moss helped oversee leasing at Silverstein’s 7 World Trade Center and is now leading efforts at 2, 3 and 4 World Trade Center.

By Al Barbarino
3/20/13


Quote:
...Where are you focusing your energy next?

With 7 World Trade Center fully leased, we’re focused on 4 World Trade Center, which will open at the end of 2013. It’s the next chapter in the history of the rebuilding of the World Trade Center, and I’m really looking forward to walking people into that lobby and showing them the extraordinary architecture and the views. We are very focused on leasing at that building, and we’re in discussions with a number of different companies looking for larger blocks of space—anywhere from 200,000 to one million [square] feet.

Who are you marketing it to, and what can tenants look forward to?

The lobby has a 46-foot-high ceiling, which creates an extraordinary impression when you enter the building. There’s a granite floor, floor-to-ceiling glass and polished black granite on the wall, which is designed to reflect the park behind you as you enter the lobby, intended to make you feel like you’re outside. I can’t think of another lobby like it in New York City. And up top, you have 360-degree views that are spectacular, and the advantage that we have in the location is that we don’t have any other building obstructing our views—we have views of the river, we have views of Midtown—so it’s really spectacular.

We’re seeing interest from a whole range of different tenants in all sorts of industries, and I think that speaks to two things: the appeal of new construction because of the efficiency it offers and the impact that a sustainable building can have on productivity.

Can you talk more about those impacts?

The buildings are all LEED-certified. That not only has obvious societal benefits, but it has a significant impact on the experience of the people working in the building, their satisfaction level and productivity. The buildings are all designed with floor-to-ceiling glass and extra-high ceilings, which allow for an abundance of natural light to permeate the entire space. The views make everyone feel like they’re working in a special place. And the awareness that the space is having a positive impact on the environment also makes people feel really good about their work space.

What’s the situation at 2 and 3 World Trade Center?

We’re in discussion with tenants that would anchor 3 World Trade Center, which would allow us to continue construction to completion by the end of 2016. Construction started and we built the first few floors, which gives us a significant advantage in terms of the time frame within which we can deliver the building to prospective tenants. Two World Trade Center is complete up to street level, and that’s a building that will be triggered by a lease commitment in the future—by a large anchor tenant.

How do you characterize the changes taking place in lower Manhattan, and how does Silverstein Properties fit into the equation?

There’s a diversification away from financial services. We’re seeing media, technology, advertising firms all moving Downtown for a variety of reasons—including access to transportation. And they are finding that their work force is migrating to surrounding neighborhoods

The population alone has doubled in the last 10 years, the number of hotel rooms has doubled, and you’ve had growth in two of the most desirable neighborhoods in New York City—Battery Park City and Tribeca. People remember a place that was old and crowded and primarily associated with financial services. Today people use words like “cool,” “new,” “high-tech,” “green” and “convenient”—those are not the words people would have used to describe Downtown 20 years ago.

How do you view Hurricane Sandy, and what are you doing to ease concerns of Downtown tenants in the face of future disasters?

Everyone did a really good job of coming back from this. Landlords were working tirelessly and creatively to find solutions. We were very successful in reopening 120 Wall Street within several weeks of the storm by bringing in emergency generators, and on a permanent basis, we’re relocating infrastructure that was previously on the basement level up to a mezzanine level. We’re not alone—other landlords are doing the same thing—and I think that’s going to allow Downtown to continue to be a premier business district.

We started a number of lease transactions at 120 Wall before the hurricane, and once we explained the measures we were taking, we had no issue completing those transactions following the storm.

We’re fortunate at the World Trade Center because our buildings are over 15 feet above sea level. Any water that entered during the storm was a result of the fact that it was an open construction site. Almost all of the mechanical and electrical equipment is located several stories above sea level. We don’t expect any issues.
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