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  #1821  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2019, 2:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
IIRC there are no plans to demolish the church itself, Instead they plan to demolish the former school on Robinson Street. This is directly related to their planned new building on Fifth though - which will replace much of Lot A, causing them to relocate some of the surface parking to Robinson Street.
Not sure I'm in favor of razing that school and replacing it with surface parking. I'd favor a parking structure there, but I'm sure such a structure would have to be fairly tall if you're going to accommodate up to 100 spaces once that surface lot along 5th is developed. It's a challenging parcel given its size as well as the terrain.
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  #1822  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2019, 3:55 PM
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East Edge East Edge is offline
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Originally Posted by Jonboy1983 View Post
PG article about the two buildings on the Boulevard and the two on Market St. I think the Market St. buildings should be saved. If I read the article correctly, the buildings at 212 and 214 Blvd of the Allies are not only not as historically significant but they're also in rather deplorable condition with buckling floors.

https://www.post-gazette.com/busines...s/201901160095

Correction... It looks like the Froggy's building is one of the ones on Market. If that has sagging floors that's rather unfortunate!!
This property owner sounds like a real ass and is typical of the arrogance of people who have no appreciation for anything but the almighty dollar. His last quote insulates that he see nothing other a recklessly managed night club as "F*U!" to anyone who would like to see the property saved. I dont give a S* about buckling floors that is BS! With today's construction methods there is a way to preserve the shell and do something dynamic with it. Look no farther than directly across the street to how beautifully a building of the same era can be re purposed in a way that sensitive to the context of the original structure.

I hope PHLF can step in with some cash along with their promises to make something special out of that building. I really feel that that section of market all the way down first to the Holiday Inn Express they are building has potential to be a quaint little pocket of retail, office and residential that could be branded and marketed to be a destination just like Market Square on a smaller scale.

For the record though i dont think im as attached to Papa J's on B of A as I am froggy's since i feel the magic is really going to happen along first and market and perhaps a meaningful new infill development could take place along Bof A that would include the poorly managed surface parking adjacent to it.
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  #1823  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2019, 7:44 PM
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Jonboy1983 Jonboy1983 is offline
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Originally Posted by East Edge View Post
This property owner sounds like a real ass and is typical of the arrogance of people who have no appreciation for anything but the almighty dollar. His last quote insulates that he see nothing other a recklessly managed night club as "F*U!" to anyone who would like to see the property saved. I dont give a S* about buckling floors that is BS! With today's construction methods there is a way to preserve the shell and do something dynamic with it. Look no farther than directly across the street to how beautifully a building of the same era can be re purposed in a way that sensitive to the context of the original structure.

I hope PHLF can step in with some cash along with their promises to make something special out of that building. I really feel that that section of market all the way down first to the Holiday Inn Express they are building has potential to be a quaint little pocket of retail, office and residential that could be branded and marketed to be a destination just like Market Square on a smaller scale.

For the record though i dont think im as attached to Papa J's on B of A as I am froggy's since i feel the magic is really going to happen along first and market and perhaps a meaningful new infill development could take place along Bof A that would include the poorly managed surface parking adjacent to it.
I hope they can do something as well with that Froggy's on Market. I'd be in favor of ripping out most of the 2nd and 3rd floors and having a restaurant or night club occupy that with main seating on the ground level and a loft upstairs and a rooftop patio above the portion fronting 1st Ave. I'm not much of a fan myself of property owners who are dollar-chasing jackasses...
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  #1824  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2019, 9:13 PM
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Just sharing this because I'm a big fan of this Philly area brewery, and it's coming to Pittsburgh! I encourage you all to check it out when it opens.

Sly Fox Brewing Co. is opening a pub in The Highline, and a Downtown satellite this fall

Quote:
This fall, the eastern Pennsylvania-based brewery will open a nearly 6,000-square-foot location on the South Side.

Sly Fox will occupy a space in The Highline development, formerly known as the Terminal Building, on E. Carson Street. The company, which annually produces 22,000 barrels of beer, will use the site as a brew lab to test experimental batches and create one-off beers suited to the local market.

A smaller satellite pub will open Downtown, in an as-yet-unannounced location.

“Why Pittsburgh? Why not? It’s a really cool place,” says John Giannopoulos, co-owner of the brewery. “It’s a metropolitan area and where there’s more people, there’s more beer.
https://www.nextpittsburgh.com/lates...ite-this-fall/
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  #1825  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 5:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Jonboy1983 View Post
I think he's talking about the church at the corner of 5th and Robinson. Below is a link to Google street-view looking at the church from Robinson St.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4379...ov%3D100?hl=en
They cant tear that down, its a Pittsburgh Landmarked building.
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  #1826  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 12:23 PM
BobMcKelvin BobMcKelvin is offline
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One project I've been interested in since it was first announced is the restoration of the Heth's Run Valley and turning a lot of that parking into green space near the zoo. They even rebuilt the bridge on Butler Street a few years back in order to provide access to the river. Yet seemingly zero progress and no word about this project for years now. It was supposed to be part of the grand idea to reduce stormwater overflows in the East End. Is this still happening?
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  #1827  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 3:18 PM
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They cant tear that down, its a Pittsburgh Landmarked building.
Good to know. I wouldn't have wanted to see that church torn down anyway. I'd like to see the rest of that area filled in with medium density development though.
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  #1828  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 4:22 PM
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Originally Posted by photoLith View Post
They cant tear that down, its a Pittsburgh Landmarked building.
According to this list, City of Pittsburgh historic designations, that Fifth Ave church is not a City designated landmark. It might be designated by PHLF, but that doesn't prevent demolition.
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  #1829  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 4:23 PM
eschaton eschaton is offline
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Originally Posted by chucka View Post
According to this list, City of Pittsburgh historic designations, that Fifth Ave church is not a City designated landmark. It might be designated by PHLF, but that doesn't prevent demolition.
Regardless, in the 25-year masterplan that Carlow submitted back in 2017, they didn't indicate any plans to demolish the church. It's likely safe for decades to come.
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  #1830  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2019, 4:47 PM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Regardless, in the 25-year masterplan that Carlow submitted back in 2017, they didn't indicate any plans to demolish the church. It's likely safe for decades to come.
Assume nothing is safe from demolition:

Carlow seeking developer for "front door" project of well over 100,000 square feet


Quote:
Carlow seeking developer for "front door" project of well over 100,000 square feet

...

Carlow’s RFQ is crafted to emphasize flexibility for submitting firms.

The RFQ indicates the university is interested in firms with success with long-term ground leases but Meadows said there is no firm expectation that Carlow will only operate under a ground lease scenario and is open to a variety of options.

Carlow similarly keeps its options open with its St. Agnes Church property, with the RFQ calling for a project design “that provides options and a rationale to include or not include” the former church owned by the university.

Meadows said Carlow is striving for a iconic building for its campus that will be the public face for the university on a stretch of Fifth Avenue, he added, the university believes "is one of the most valuable parcels of land in the Oakland area.”
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  #1831  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2019, 2:57 AM
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This is interesting. The company building the townhouses on Buncher's Property (confusingly called "Strip District Brownstones" has expanded from its original footprint of 46 townhouses, and now will be building another 21 elsewhere.

I can't find any evidence in the Next Pittsburgh article to suggest where these townhouses are going to be - except it certainly isn't along the back side of the terminal, since all that is in the existing development.

Anyone want to hazard a guess?
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  #1832  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2019, 3:08 AM
Brentsters Brentsters is offline
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  #1833  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2019, 9:32 PM
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New ZBA up for 2/14: Everything of interest is Lawrenceville this week.

1. New house in Upper Lawrenceville replacing an ugly brick number from the 1920s.

2. Replacement house(s) in Lower Lawrenceville partially replacing a little frame shitbox. The exact number is unclear, but presuming the side gravel yard is attached, possibly 2-3 homes would fit there.

3. Hop Farm Brewing appears to be expanding into the one-story building next door - now occupied by a CrossFit place.

4. At least two infill homes going on a vacant lot here in Upper Lawrenceville.

5. Conversion of these five rowhouses in Lawrenceville into a 10-unit apartment building with new construction and integral parking.
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  #1834  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2019, 10:05 PM
BrianTH BrianTH is offline
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Anyone want to hazard a guess?
This PG article suggests to me they are just buying the land in phases, but all in the same area:

https://www.post-gazette.com/busines...s/201901220048
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  #1835  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2019, 3:12 AM
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This really has nothing to do with Pittsburgh development, but I happened to take one of my favorite photos Ive gotten since I moved to Pittsburgh almost 6 years ago of Heinz Chapel tonight. Thought you guys would appreciate it.

ACV_0311 by photolitherland, on Flickr
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  #1836  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2019, 3:58 AM
DKNewYork DKNewYork is offline
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Originally Posted by photoLith View Post
This really has nothing to do with Pittsburgh development, but I happened to take one of my favorite photos Ive gotten since I moved to Pittsburgh almost 6 years ago of Heinz Chapel tonight. Thought you guys would appreciate it.

ACV_0311 by photolitherland, on Flickr
Absolutely beautiful. Well done.
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  #1837  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2019, 12:53 PM
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Jonboy1983 Jonboy1983 is offline
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PhotoLith, two words:
art... gallery...
That is all...
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  #1838  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2019, 1:56 PM
eschaton eschaton is offline
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PBT has up an article about the new Walnut Capital building behind its paywall. I'm yoinking the text again via page source:

Quote:
Walnut Capital Partners is poised to again test the zoning limits for a new development, this one it’s calling an Innovation Research Tower proposed for an assemblage of properties along Fifth Avenue at the corner of Halket Street near the heart of Oakland.

The Shadyside-based development firm presented its plan for the new office building — proposed to total 12 stories and reach an 185 foot height that is more than 30 percent taller than the site’s 120-foot zoning limit — to a meeting hosted by Oakland Planning & Development in advance of a scheduled February hearing before the Pittsburgh Zoning Board of Adjustment.

It’s a development Walnut Capital is working to tee up now as the project is unlikely to be under construction for at least a year as the company continues with its current project a few blocks away redeveloping the Pittsburgh Athletic Association into a new office address, along with the ongoing construction of its second building at Bakery Square 2.0 on Penn Avenue in the East End.

Citing a 2017 Brookings Institution report on Oakland, Walnut Capital President Todd Reidbord told a gathering of Oakland residents and other neighborhood stakeholders their early vision for the site of what is now a collection of commercial properties modest in scale, including two it bought from Allegheny County

“We think one of the future growth potentials is for what everybody is calling the Oakland innovation district,” said Reidbord.

The new building, currently designed to total 285,000 square feet of rent-able space, including 6,000 or 7,000 square feet of first floor retail and 100 parking spaces on two levels, is expected to be a “great opportunity” for “corporations, research institutions and others that are looking to get closer to our great universities,” said Reidbord.

Working with a design by downtown-based Strada Architecture, LLC, Walnut Capital Partners is pursuing the project with new financial partner Lionstone Investments without an identified tenant for a proposal that company chairman Gregg Perelman said could accommodate a mix of different sized tenants.

According to the agenda for the Feb. 7 hearing before the Zoning Board of Adjustments, Walnut Capital is seeking one special exception and three variances, all relating to key concerns expressed by attendees at the meeting.

The special exception is to allow a building with a height up to 120 feet that fronts on Fifth Avenue, with a companion variance for up to 85 feet above that.

Walnut Capital is also seeking a variance for floor area ratio and to provide spaces for 100 cars in the project instead of the 347 spaces required, according to the zoning agenda.

The firm is no stranger to pushing the envelop on zoning height requirements in the city. Walnut Capital’s new building under construction at Bakery Square, for which Philips will take 200,000 square feet, will be about 127 feet tall and total more than 300,000 square feet after originally being limited to 85 feet and about 100,000 square feet less.

Walnut Capital is pursuing the project with the expectation of granting the first floor retail space to Oakland Planning & Development for a nominal fee to make use of it for local community business in a market in which first floor retail in new urban buildings has often been a challenge to lease out commercially.

The project could also include more expensive lab space for research, catering to research-oriented tenants with a strong desire to be within walking distance of the neighborhood’s universities and medical institutions.

While he wouldn’t divulge a cost estimate for the project, Perelman said he expects it will be a more expensive building than Walnut Capital’s new nine-story project underway at Bakery Square, which is expected to cost $40 million.

The Oakland meeting attendees expressed a host of basic concerns about the Walnut Capital plan. A major concern is always over the neighborhood’s chronic limits for parking. There was also concern about the overall scale of the development for a site that’s adjacent to the Skyvue Apartments, a recent development that reached a 120-foot height limit and is an enormous and looming presence over the neighboring stretch of Fifth and Forbes Avenues.

Reidbord argued the building will be terraced back from the street to help alleviate the height issue for a project slated to achieve LEED Gold status. He also expects the project’s bike parking, neighborhood’s bike lanes and strong public transportation resources, including an expected BRT station nearby, will result in less workers in the building driving to work.

Nick Lardas, an Oakland resident who lives a short walk from the site, observed the Skyvue project was only allowed to build up to 120 feet once it achieved various benchmarks for LEED, public transit accommodations and bike parking.

The added 65 feet struck him as a far push beyond a limit that’s already been stretched.

“Why should we allow zoning to be exceeded by that much?” he asked. “There’s other locations in Oakland where builders want to build buildings twice and three times what zoning allows. What good does zoning do the residents of the city, or more specifically, the residents of Oakland, if the city allows developers to go way beyond what zoning says they can do?”

Reidbord argued for a “give and take” with the city over the scale of he project, and noted how other cities such as Cambridge, Mass., have instituted parking maximums, putting limits on how parking developers can provide in new developments; building taller is a way to bring in new companies and help to build upon the city’s tax base, he added, noting that two of the properties will go back on the tax rolls after being long owned by the county in a time of changing lifestyles and commuting patterns.

“We don’t think height is a bad thing,” he said.
Basically, NIMBYs are still being NIMBYs.
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  #1839  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2019, 4:55 PM
Minivan Werner Minivan Werner is offline
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He accidentally brings up a good point... there's no reason for height restrictions along the 5th/Forbes corridor in the heart of Oakland.
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  #1840  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2019, 5:06 PM
Gilamonster Gilamonster is offline
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The webcam for Lumiere is showing the flag, Christmas tree, and broom on top of the structural steel, so that part of the project is complete.
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