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  #21  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2008, 8:10 PM
M.K. M.K. is offline
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Every vertical structure with a ratio for height much more than the base dimensions for ergonomics average humans, those which are at least 10 times more in comparing how tall this average dimension is, independent for which use and objective human used or not they are, but everytime man made.

So for example 55% of humans have a estature of 1.75m, so a skyscraper for them would be every vertical thin structure more than 17.5m high or 20m to round the number.

For an ant those proporsions would be different in relative area. For them those South America in Pantanal big ants' nest are supertall, super skyscrapers in their eyes or the Burj Dubai of them.
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  #22  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2008, 6:47 AM
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Shape.Spire and the Skyline is all that you need
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  #23  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2008, 6:39 PM
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Wikipedia definition:
A skyscraper is a tall, continuously building. There is no official definition or a precise cutoff height above which a building may clearly be classified as a skyscraper. However, as per usual practice in most cities, the definition is used empirically, depending on the relative impact of the shape of a building to a city's overall skyline. Thus, depending on the average height of the rest of the buildings and/ or structures in a city, even a building of 80 meters height (approximately 262 ft) may be considered a skyscraper provided that it clearly stands out above its surrounding built environment and significantly changes the overall skyline of that particular city.
The word "skyscraper" originally was a nautical term referring to a tall mast or its main sail on a sailing ship. The term was first applied to buildings in the late 19th century as a result of public amazement at the tall buildings being built in Chicago and New York City. The traditional definition of a skyscraper began with the "first skyscraper", a steel-framed ten storey building. Chicago's now demolished ten storey steel-framed Home Insurance Building (1885) is generally accepted as the "first skyscraper".
The structural definition of the word skyscraper was refined later by architectural historians, based on engineering developments of the 1880s that had enabled construction of tall multi-storey buildings. This definition was based on the steel skeleton—as opposed to constructions of load-bearing masonry, which passed their practical limit in 1891 with Chicago's Monadnock Building. Philadelphia's City Hall, completed in 1901, still holds claim as the world's tallest load-bearing masonry structure at 167 m (548 ft). The steel frame developed in stages of increasing self-sufficiency, with several buildings in Chicago and New York advancing the technology that allowed the steel frame to carry a building on its own. Today, however, many of the tallest skyscrapers are built almost entirely with reinforced concrete. Pumps and storage tanks maintain water pressure at the top of skyscrapers.
A loose convention in the United States and Europe now draws the lower limit of a skyscraper at 150 meters (500 ft).[1] A skyscraper taller than 300 meters (984 ft) may be referred to as supertall. Shorter buildings are still sometimes referred to as skyscrapers if they appear to dominate their surroundings.
The somewhat arbitrary term skyscraper should not be confused with the slightly less arbitrary term highrise, defined by the Emporis Standards Committee as "...a multi-storey structure with at least 12 floors or 35 meters (115 feet) in height."[2] Some structural engineers define a highrise as any vertical construction for which wind is a more significant load factor than earthquake or weight. Note that this criterion fits not only high rises but some other tall structures, such as towers.
The word skyscraper often carries a connotation of pride and achievement. The skyscraper, in name and social function, is a modern expression of the age-old symbol of the world center or axis mundi: a pillar that connects earth to heaven and the four compass directions to one another.[3]

I know, it is already said, but then the complete version. Sorry
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  #24  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2008, 1:40 AM
makejie makejie is offline
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Then you have the skyscraper.

Minimum sized Skyscraper: 20 storys or 250 ft., which ever comes first.

Midsized Skyscraper: 400 - 600 ft.

Tall Skyscraper: 600 ft. or better

SuperScraper: 1000 ft. or better

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  #25  
Old Posted Sep 26, 2008, 8:07 PM
skyscraper skyscraper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c@taract_soulj@h View Post
Shape.Spire and the Skyline is all that you need
to be a skyscraper,you don't need a spire - you just need to aspire.
(is that corny?)
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  #26  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2012, 6:27 AM
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I know this is an old thread, and the truth is there's no one universally accepted definition. But just for your interest here's a link to the definition used by Phorio's database, from its standards section:

http://standards.phorio.com/?t=defin...ode=6761770913

It defines a skyscraper as "a multi-story building at least 100 meters tall" - basically a metric definition. By this logic I guess you could call a 1000-meter building a "decaskyscraper".
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  #27  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2012, 8:07 PM
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Skyscraper = tall building. That's it
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