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  #921  
Old Posted May 22, 2019, 8:49 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Here's a neat photo from the Chronicle Herald Archives showing the new trolleybuses at the corner of Spring Garden and Barrington on March 1, 1949.

I find it interesting that all the cobblestones and rails are still in place, I imagine due to the rail system having just been taken out of service, or still running with some overlap. Definitely a photo which illustrates some transition between services, in any case.



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  #922  
Old Posted May 22, 2019, 9:30 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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As a side note, I've never seen it explained as to why the old rails were always surrounded with cobblestones, even after asphalt pavement came into use.

Does anybody know the reason?
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  #923  
Old Posted May 23, 2019, 3:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
As a side note, I've never seen it explained as to why the old rails were always surrounded with cobblestones, even after asphalt pavement came into use.

Does anybody know the reason?
I would imagine because it was easier to leave the cobblestone around them then have to rip them completely out to repave.
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  #924  
Old Posted May 23, 2019, 4:17 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Makes sense, but I wonder why they were surrounded with cobblestones in the first place? Was that the only form of 'pavement' that was in use when the rails were installed?

Maybe they needed stone for the horses to walk on before it became an electric railway?
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  #925  
Old Posted May 23, 2019, 6:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
Here's a neat photo from the Chronicle Herald Archives showing the new trolleybuses at the corner of Spring Garden and Barrington on March 1, 1949.

I find it interesting that all the cobblestones and rails are still in place, I imagine due to the rail system having just been taken out of service, or still running with some overlap. Definitely a photo which illustrates some transition between services, in any case.
The last day of service for the street railway was 26 March, 1949. I certainly wouldn't want to suggest something in the Herald was -- gasp -- in error, but when I saw that image in the paper this week I was puzzled by the claimed publication date of March 1. According to an article in the April 1954 edition of Canadian Rail (published just five years after the trolley coaches were introduced), tram service on downtown routes (1, 2, 7 and 8) ended on 26 March. Further, it says there was no overlap; the catenary system for the trams (one wire) was different than for the trolleys (two wires) so it had to be removed before the new lines went up, with rented buses providing service during the transition.

So I can't say for certain the Herald information is wrong but it doesn't seem to be consistent with other sources. And, speaking generally, I am frequently irritated by the limited information and obvious lack of basic research that often accompanies those archival shots in the Herald.

Source: Canadian Rail 17
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  #926  
Old Posted May 23, 2019, 9:56 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Thanks as always, ns_kid. I saw the March 26 date elsewhere as well, so I suspect you are correct. I presumed that the Herald had archived notes with the photos, but who knows how organized their archives are, or how astute the attendants of the archives are. I suspect not so much.

I'd love to have an opportunity to rummage through their photo archives, but I imagine that is not something available to the public. It appears that they are (rightfully) holding onto their archives as an asset, which is understandable given the state of the print media industry these days, but my god I imagine they have a wealth of photos and information that could greatly benefit historians and history buffs from Halifax alike!

IMHO, in a perfect world the city and/or the province and the feds would make them a fair offer for their archives as historical artifacts, and then make them available online for citizens to benefit from. It would surely be a huge task, but worthwhile to my way of thinking. It would also be a way to ensure they don't end up in the landfill should the Herald suffer bankruptcy or be bought out by a larger company that gives the order to trash all the old stuff. It has happened to other organizations in the past...
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  #927  
Old Posted May 31, 2019, 4:24 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Often when I'm downtown I think about some of the empty lots that seem like they've been empty forever, and wonder what was there before. It sometimes amazes me that these lots in prime or at least semi-prime areas have been able to remain empty or as small parking lots literally for decades.

One of those lots is the one on the corner of Prince and Market Streets. This one has been empty for as long as I can reasonably remember.

I did find some pics on the Halifax Municipal Archives from the early 1960s that show the old residence and corner store that existed there:







City of Halifax fonds
Halifax (N.S.). Committee on Works records
Halifax (N.S.) Works Department photographs
46-48 Market St.
Retrieval code: 102-39-1-1030
[1962]
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  #928  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2019, 11:02 PM
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I don’t know if this has been posted before, but if so I never saw it previously. A home movie from 1945 in color no less, showing areas of the downtown. Fascinating in many ways.

A Trip to Halifax 1945
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  #929  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2019, 12:12 AM
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I don’t know if this has been posted before, but if so I never saw it previously. A home movie from 1945 in color no less, showing areas of the downtown. Fascinating in many ways.
That is fascinating, Keith. Some nice views of the downtown streets but even more so of the people. I enjoyed the many views of the Birney trams. Colour stills of the Birney cars are rare enough so the colour film is tremendous.
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  #930  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2019, 12:14 AM
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1945 looks so long ago. AND I came along in 47 - I remember the guy playing the accordion and there used to be a blind man selling pencils there on Barrington St
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  #931  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2019, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
I don’t know if this has been posted before, but if so I never saw it previously. A home movie from 1945 in color no less, showing areas of the downtown. Fascinating in many ways.

A Trip to Halifax 1945
I think it has, but who cares? It's such a great way of showing how vibrant Halifax downtown was Post/Just about post war. There is basically a Birney car for every automobile. Man I wish that's the way it still was today.
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  #932  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2019, 4:31 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Great video Keith. Thanks for sharing!

A few observations:
- In general people walking on the street seemed to be more well dressed/stylish than people today.
- Lots of school-aged kids walking by themselves, without a parent present, nor vehicle waiting at the side of the road to pick them up directly from school.
- Lots of kids actively playing in the schoolyard.
- No cell phones (lol)!
- Streetside shops often had large awnings to shield customers from the weather.
- Downtown was very active and bustling with people walking about.
- Lots of Birneys, but traffic seemed to move around it well enough.
- Stone and wrought iron were the building materials of the day.
- Many overhead wires.
- Street busker playing an accordion.
- No roundabouts - traffic cop!
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  #933  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2019, 5:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
Great video Keith. Thanks for sharing!

A few observations:
- In general people walking on the street seemed to be more well dressed/stylish than people today.
- Lots of school-aged kids walking by themselves, without a parent present, nor vehicle waiting at the side of the road to pick them up directly from school.
- Lots of kids actively playing in the schoolyard.
- No cell phones (lol)!
- Streetside shops often had large awnings to shield customers from the weather.
- Downtown was very active and bustling with people walking about.
- Lots of Birneys, but traffic seemed to move around it well enough.
- Stone and wrought iron were the building materials of the day.
- Many overhead wires.
- Street busker playing an accordion.
- No roundabouts - traffic cop!
Little to no obesity either...
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  #934  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2019, 9:02 PM
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One of the things that jumped out at me were the number of very little kids seemingly out on their own - the little fellow on the sidewalk with his dog, and the even littler fellow mugging for the camera. I also found it interesting that the current parking lot next to St. Mary's Basilica used to be a schoolyard.

I also remember when my mom used to take me shopping downtown with her in the 1960s, most stores had a crank-out canvas awning in bright colors or patterns over their storefronts, which were much appreciated on warm sunny days.

Last edited by Keith P.; Jul 5, 2019 at 9:13 PM.
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  #935  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2019, 9:48 PM
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My mother never knew where I was until I came home to eat, then off again..... on my bike or walking all over the city from the north end the south end (Point Pleasant Park). It was a much different time growing up in the sixties and seventies.
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  #936  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2019, 2:01 PM
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I found it interesting especially with the piano soundtrack. It reminds me of similar films of NYC. In fact I was struck by this film maker's interest in the urbanity of Halifax. He often panned up the facades of buildings, seemingly impressed by the scale and architecture. I could almost imagine his internal dialog - "I wish these buildings were taller!"
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  #937  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2019, 7:31 PM
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A couple photos from the Nova Scotia Parks Canada Twitter account:

In front of the Capitol Theatre during WWII blackouts, probably late 1939 or early 1940


1944 shot of a building in the Citadel that was torn down in the 1950's
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  #938  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2019, 4:08 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Great pics. Thanks for posting.

I wish I could remember the Capitol Theatre more, but by all indications it was a nice example that would have been a good one to keep around.

I only really started paying attention to Halifax's old architecture long after it was gone, unfortunately.
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  #939  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2019, 6:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
Great pics. Thanks for posting.

I wish I could remember the Capitol Theatre more, but by all indications it was a nice example that would have been a good one to keep around.

I only really started paying attention to Halifax's old architecture long after it was gone, unfortunately.
I have only a vague memory of being in it one time when I was a tyke. From what I understand the interior was far more impressive than the outside, although that was certainly respectable too. I think the regret at its loss is more over what replaced it, which has been a problematic building for a number of reasons:

- mediocre exterior
- poor interaction with the street
- wind effects
- mismatched cladding on the upper floors
- poor interior air quality (at least when I worked there)
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  #940  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2019, 8:05 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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I do recall being impressed by the Maritime Centre when it was first built, mostly because there weren't that many buildings of its type in Halifax. I also thought it was 'neat' that it was built at such an angle as to be minimally intrusive to the view of the harbour from the Citadel (which is no longer a 'thing'). But at this time I am now more in agreement with you on that.

I think it's kind of sad that Halifax didn't keep any of its more elegant and ornate early 20th century theatres. The last one to go, the Oxford, which I believe is being converted into a climbing gym of some sort, was along those lines but somewhat less ornate than the Capitol.

I don't recall ever being inside the theatre, but here are a few pics from the NS archives:







And a colour pic:

Source

A pic taken, strangely, from the old burying grounds in the early 1970s:

Source

One from the 1930s:
[IMG][/IMG]
Source

Additional info: https://historicnovascotia.ca/items/show/99
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