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  #1701  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2019, 2:47 PM
Reesor Reesor is offline
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The 84 running all day will be a huge benefit to those of us getting to the Dockyard from Sackville at non-peak hours. I hope they keep the same frequency at peak hours that they have now. The 182 will help with some of the load from Cobequid in the mornings.
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  #1702  
Old Posted May 27, 2019, 10:26 PM
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  #1703  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 12:39 PM
atbw atbw is offline
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Looks like commuter rail is dead in the water for now. Sounds like council didn't think it would work given the amount of control CN has over the rail infrastructure.
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  #1704  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 2:58 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by atbw View Post
Looks like commuter rail is dead in the water for now. Sounds like council didn't think it would work given the amount of control CN has over the rail infrastructure.
OMG... you're kidding me.

I guess I have to agree with Keith now - we need to get some council members in there that actually want the city to succeed....
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  #1705  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 3:11 PM
Phalanx Phalanx is offline
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That's the problem with half-measures. If you want to be cheap, there will be consequences one way or another. (Which is fine if everything works, but then you don't get to complain about those consequences)
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  #1706  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 4:21 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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I don't want them to be cheap. I want them to make it happen.

Honestly, I've been supportive of improving bike transportation, but IMHO this should be of much higher priority than bike lanes... and it would also help bicyclists who commute as well.

https://www.thestar.com/halifax/2019...-proposal.html

IMHO, everybody who lives in Halifax and cares about this has to complain to their councilors... now. These guys are really disappointing.
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  #1707  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 7:11 PM
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Here's the worst part - because the city signed a NDA with CN during the discussions, they won't release any of the details to allow people to see what might have been the sticking points or determine other possible courses of action. All we know are a few vague statements like "I could not in good conscience agree to the deal proposed" and other platitudes.
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  #1708  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2019, 7:12 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Ugh.
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  #1709  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2019, 10:56 AM
atbw atbw is offline
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Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
Here's the worst part - because the city signed a NDA with CN during the discussions, they won't release any of the details to allow people to see what might have been the sticking points or determine other possible courses of action. All we know are a few vague statements like "I could not in good conscience agree to the deal proposed" and other platitudes.
I feel like it came down to the city operating transit on lines that would be completely controlled by CN, even if they added new lines. What good is a transit option if another company - that has no real interest in commuter rail - determines how and when you can use the lines?

One point I've seen raised is that there isn't as much density along the Bedford Highway as there is a bit off it -- Larry Uteck, Clayton Park West and in Bedford itself. A BRT system that gives more direct service to those areas (and that services the core, instead of the periphery of downtown) would be far more convenient for people. Throw in some bus lanes through the Windsor Exchange to bypass the parking lot, limited stops, and you suddenly have a viable alternative to driving that can grow with the city.
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  #1710  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2019, 11:12 AM
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If there had been any foresight by HRM it would have been relatively easy to do some sort of dedicated transit route from those areas, likely bus or light rail or a combo system. You have the existing Dunbrack corridor and you also have/had the abandoned rail ROW from the end of that roughly paralleling the 102 down to Joe Howe which is now a trail. Presto, you're on the peninsula. If it was BRT then you are most of the way there already and just need a way to/from the downtown.

I can already hear the anguished screams of the cyclist activists at the prospect of a trail ROW being used for the greater good.
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  #1711  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2019, 2:37 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Do the feds not have any control over rail service in our country anymore? Is it possible to get them in on this to help move it along?

I dunno... regardless of the situation, it seems a little negligent to just shut down the idea without pursuing it further. The ROW is there, and one would think there must be a way to work around it.

There was recently an agreement reached to improve the container terminal situation using rail, so I'm thinking if it can be done to improve the moving of containers, why can we not also achieve some method of moving people using the same ROW??

It is the lack of details which make it more difficult to accept, though. The way it looks now, we will be tied to depending on diesel buses on existing roadways to eternity, despite the fact that Halifax is growing by leaps and bounds. There seems to be no vision that will carry us into the future, only enough political will to see what will work for in 4-year blocks to hopefully have good enough optics to get elected again...
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  #1712  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2019, 4:15 PM
swimmer_spe swimmer_spe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atbw View Post
I feel like it came down to the city operating transit on lines that would be completely controlled by CN, even if they added new lines. What good is a transit option if another company - that has no real interest in commuter rail - determines how and when you can use the lines?

One point I've seen raised is that there isn't as much density along the Bedford Highway as there is a bit off it -- Larry Uteck, Clayton Park West and in Bedford itself. A BRT system that gives more direct service to those areas (and that services the core, instead of the periphery of downtown) would be far more convenient for people. Throw in some bus lanes through the Windsor Exchange to bypass the parking lot, limited stops, and you suddenly have a viable alternative to driving that can grow with the city.
Many of the GO, EXO and even the WCE uses CP trackage. This is likely more down to not reaching an amicable agreement than CN simply saying "No".
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  #1713  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2019, 7:41 PM
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Halifax council moves ahead with Young and Robie bus lanes

Zane WoodfordStar Halifax
July 16, 2019

HALIFAX—Council is moving ahead with bus lanes for Robie and Young streets that could speed up some of the city’s most popular routes.

At its meeting on Tuesday, Halifax regional council voted unanimously in favour of moving to detailed design on the bus lanes, planned for next year on Young St. between Windsor and Robie streets, and Robie St. between Young St. and Quinpool Rd.

Combined with bus lanes on nearby Bayers Rd., which could be built this year, the new lanes would significantly reduce commutes for riders on Halifax Transit routes 80 and 81, which go to Bedford and Sackville, along with Route 7, which travels Robie and Gottingen streets.

While the bus lanes will benefit transit users, a staff report notes they’re expected to increase traffic congestion for other vehicles.

The first phase of the project, scheduled for construction next year, would put outbound bus lanes along the curb on the full stretch of Robie St. from Quinpool Rd. to Young St. and on Young St. to Windsor St.

The lanes would run in both directions on Robie St. between Young St. and Almon St., and between Cunard St. and Quinpool Rd.

None of the Robie and Young bus lanes require the municipality to widen the streets or buy any land, municipal engineer Mike Connors told council.

The detailed design will cost $250,000, and the construction is expected to cost $1.9 million, based on early estimates.

The second phase would require the municipality to buy land and widen the streets to enable bus lanes in both directions, and the cost is unknown.

“We have a reasonable idea of what property we might need, but we want to do a little bit more design work to test the alignment and see what the changes might be,” Connors told council.

Councillor Waye Mason hoped the detailed design would investigate extending the bus lane on Robie St. to Spring Garden Rd., one of the city’s main transit corridors.

“Ultimately, I think that this is a great start toward the goal of getting transit priority all the way to Spring Garden Rd. and that main corridor there,” Mason said.

Councillor Sam Austin agreed, and argued there may be sections of Robie St. south of Quinpool Rd. that wouldn’t require buying any land.

The bus lanes would be in effect between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday to Friday, meaning there’d be no parking at the 57 on-street spots in the area during the day. Parking and loading restrictions would be lifted on evenings and weekends.

https://twitter.com/zwoodford

https://www.thestar.com/halifax/2019...bus-lanes.html
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  #1714  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2019, 10:35 AM
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Good luck doing this on Robie between Almon and Cunard. Clearly Mason, Austin and their ilk are trying to drive private vehicles off the peninsula.
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