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  #21  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2006, 2:42 AM
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  #22  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2006, 5:37 PM
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IBM is gorgeous
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  #23  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2006, 11:56 PM
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I really like that post office building(the one story cube), its simple, but not at all ordinary.
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 12:20 AM
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Modernism works best when it's contrasted with other architecture. Mies got that right with his locations
You really see that with that Federal Center ensemble. They way it works is that it works in relation to the big blocky period high rises around it, which define urban canyons. Then the two Mies high rises and the low rise postoffice open up the space for the plaza, and work together to play off each other, and the surrounding buildings.

Its a very sucessfull and probably very well-studied urban design. The individual buildings are all great lat Mies too, with the shadowline projecting I-beam detail activating the facades and the perfect porportioning of the facades and windows. Its just supremely elegant and classical.
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  #25  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 5:12 AM
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The buildings on Lakeshore Drive are some of my favourites in the world. They'd be even better if they weren't ripped off by every Tom Dick and Harry Architect out there for the better part of four decades.
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  #26  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 9:05 PM
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^^^^ Like the ones just northwest and west of 860-880. Don't know who the archtitects were but they are sure copies!
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  #27  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 9:23 PM
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^^^^ Like the ones just northwest and west of 860-880. Don't know who the archtitects were but they are sure copies!
On Emporis they are listed as "Esplanade Apartments" 1 and 2, and I'll give you one guess who the architect of record was. It's a tuffy!

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  #28  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 10:24 PM
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Those two are Mies as well. You post kinda stumped me for a second, I was trying to figure out whose they were.

Westmount Square in Montreal is also a beauty.

http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=westmount+square
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  #29  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 12:50 AM
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On Emporis they are listed as "Esplanade Apartments" 1 and 2, and I'll give you one guess who the architect of record was. It's a tuffy!

SSDD
Should have guessed! His buildings are everywhere, including right next door!
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  #30  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 4:02 PM
ChicagotoRoanoke ChicagotoRoanoke is offline
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His works influenced an entire era of skyscrapers and without doubt have made a HUGE positive contribution to Chicago and it's arcitectural diversity and beauty. That being said, I got my doctorate at IIT and NO ONE (well at least no one I've met) would call that place a warm and inviting campus. Too much Mies makes a place cold and austere. Completely agree that it works best in contrast with other more ornate architecture.
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  #31  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 5:32 PM
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An original Mies project to me is as close to modernist architectural perfection is as possible, and all the cheap imitators are as worse as modernism can get. I just hope that all of his buildings are delcared historical sites so they can never be altered or demolished....
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  #32  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 9:48 PM
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Originally Posted by ChicagotoRoanoke View Post
His works influenced an entire era of skyscrapers and without doubt have made a HUGE positive contribution to Chicago and it's arcitectural diversity and beauty. That being said, I got my doctorate at IIT and NO ONE (well at least no one I've met) would call that place a warm and inviting campus. Too much Mies makes a place cold and austere. Completely agree that it works best in contrast with other more ornate architecture.
I can say I had the same feelings about ITT on past visits. And with similar impressions while walking through the canyon formed by 1 and 2 Illinois Center. Although the buildings themsleves are typical Mies the tightly packed arrangement of structures is particularly dark and cold. Contrary to the Federal Center where the varying heights create a lively inviting open space. So what does it say about Mies designs if his works only fit well into an environment with other non-Miesien buildings?
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  #33  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2006, 1:37 AM
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"So what does it say about Mies designs if his works only fit well into an environment with other non-Miesien buildings?"

I think it said that he was very supportive of architectural diversity. to design your buildings do that they can't be near your buildings takes gut. Balls, even.

Although TD Toronto doesn't look too cold. Except the winter pictures of it, of course.
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  #34  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 6:06 AM
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Perfection in my eyes. When done well, with close attention paid to certain details, refined and maintained fully, it works for me.
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  #35  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 2:24 PM
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Mies

Quote:
So what does it say about Mies designs if his works only fit well into an environment with other non-Miesien buildings?"
Well, there is the Farnsworth House, which is a perfect work of architecutre that is remarkably sensenative to its natural context.

And Mies did a series of country houses in Germany that are quite good too (but in brick, not steel. People often forget Mies was a master of working with brick).

I was lucky to get a tour of the Farnsworth House when it was still owned by Lord Palumbo (and furnished). That the house was somewhat open to the public was not well know, so when I found out I immediatly made reservations and drove out to Plano for a tour, which also included Palumbo's sculpture garden in a big prairie somewhat removed from the house.
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  #36  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 3:03 PM
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[QUOTE=Jeff_in_Dayton;2501426]You really see that with that Federal Center ensemble. They way it works is that it works in relation to the big blocky period high rises around it, which define urban canyons. Then the two Mies high rises and the low rise postoffice open up the space for the plaza, and work together to play off each other, and the surrounding buildings. /QUOTE]

I agree that the Federal Center works and, at least in my perspective is one of Mies' finest accomplishments, near perfection. LPT is a fine Mies inspired design that also works extremely well, especially or inspite of its isolated locale. However I don't agree that all of Mies' buildings are well placed. IBM is totally out of sync with its surroundings. Prior to IBM, Marina City stood as an icon. Post IBM, Mies building totally dominates the location distracting, and not in any way blending, with the beauty of MC. One wonders how different this set might be with a more LPT like IBM! Now Trump will surpass IBM, but at least Trump gives homage to both IBM, in the windows, and MC,through its curved face. One and Two Illinois Center are other Mies examples that I don't think work well at all.
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  #37  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 2:49 AM
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Absolute perfection. The simplicity and darkness of his designs, mixed with a sort of mesmerizing aura allow the building to fit in any location. Many of the lobbies, I've noticed, have large, open spaces with few columns and large, clear glass windows to allow as much light as possible, and to maybe make it feel less bulky. Looking up at the TD center gave me chills of awe. Yamasaki's WTC gave the same effects.
Pure, cold simplicity and a blacker black than the blackest black truly gives his buildings a feel, and a darkened soul unlike any other.
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