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  #101  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2011, 9:41 PM
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Originally Posted by HooverDam View Post
I'm not wishing for Arizona or Phoenix to have more diploma mills, just the opposite! I wish ASU West and Poly could spin off into their own schools so ASU could reduce enrollment, increase costs and increase selectivity and quality. We need a multifaceted higher education with different types and sizes of schools for different type of people.
I totally agree; I believe in quality and variety.
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  #102  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2011, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by phxSUNSfan View Post
ASU West should spin off as Phoenix State University , and Phoenix College should become a highly selective 4-year liberal arts college; it has that nice historic campus atmosphere.
Couldn't agree more or ASU West could be called "Central AZ U", they could have the students vote on a name. It should be primarily a teaching school focusing primarily on undergraduates at a reasonable cost, akin to the Cal State schools.

"Graduating" PC into a small liberal arts college just makes too much sense for it not to happen eventually. Boise St and Utah Valley both were once JC's, so it can be done.

Graduating PC would of course create a deficit in the Community College sector, but PC Downtown could fairly easily be expanded into "Downtown Community College." The City already owns a fair amount of land West of Central, South of Roosevelt (the Papas School, et al) where the campus could be built out in an urban style.

I'd like ASU Poly to become Arizona Polytechnic and be a highly selective research intensive school. Obviously it would take it decades and dollars to grow it into something like MIT or Cal Tech (and it likely never would) but it could be at least as good as schools like Missouri University of Science & Tech and the like.

Eventually a supply of well educated college graduates being pumped out of the Valley will create a demand. Companies don't locate re-locate here in part due to poor education. Additionally the more highly educate people a metro produces the higher chance you're at for locally grown start up companies that make it big.
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  #103  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 4:27 AM
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Actually Vicelord...you are pretty right on...the talk of any asu medical school is mythical...at least in our lifetime. When UofA got the med school in Phoenix...that shut the door on asu...certainly in our lifetime.
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  #104  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 7:29 AM
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^ No it didn't. They were in partnership. I have somewhere one of the only pieces of merchandise with ASU and the UofA logo both on it.

ASU bailed out of the partnership mostly for budgetary reasons.
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  #105  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 7:50 AM
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nerd fight!!!
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  #106  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 7:50 AM
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not discluding myself from nerd status. I mean I do post here after all. lol
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  #107  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 8:23 AM
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It was the "University of Arizona Medical School downtown Phoenix in partnership with asu." All that was is that asu chipped in a small percentage of money (and use the asu nurses from their nursing school a few blocks away) - and about a year ago...they decided to stop contributing $$ - virtually ending the "partnership." The UofA has been running it from the beginning. UofA's Tucson med school opened up 40 years ago...now that it has opened their branch in Phoenix...I doubt the Arizona Board of Regents would approve another one - any time soon - like in the next 50 years! Both schools continue to work together at T-Gen next door to the UofA med school.
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  #108  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by azcats View Post
.I doubt the Arizona Board of Regents would approve another one - any time soon - like in the next 50 years!
While you're right that ABOR is a bunch of buffoons, it doesn't really make sense to not allow another medical school in AZ. I mean think about the position ABOR is taking, they're saying "No, we don't want a new Medical school. We want fewer Doctors, we want less education."

Luckily Dr Crow has built himself into a position where he can likely strong arm ABOR.
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  #109  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 2:54 PM
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Let's all just let azcats live in his world where au has a medical school and ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY doesn't. It may be a fantasy land someday soon, but I don't think he really cares. He just wants au to have something, anything, ASU doesn't.
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  #110  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 3:41 PM
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ASU already has the foundation in place for a med school; for all intents and purposes, ASU has one at present except they don't have the capacity to graduate doctors. ASU graduates nurses from a highly ranked program, conducts medical research with one of the top hospitals in the country (Mayo), and collaborates with groups such as TGen. There was really no need to continue a "partnership" with UA. The next logical step would be to start producing doctors and that is likely within this decade.
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  #111  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 8:59 PM
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I brought back an old thread about this general subject and moved the above discussions from the CityScape thread.
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  #112  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 9:18 PM
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Originally Posted by combusean View Post
I brought back an old thread about this general subject and moved the above discussions from the CityScape thread.
Moderator of the year award, comin' your way!
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  #113  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2011, 10:34 PM
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^ Why thank you. I graciously accept such accolades upon my moderation. Two people had already complained, and the off-topic discussion had gone on too long. It was time to act decisively.
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  #114  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2011, 3:45 AM
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Colleges@ASU in Lake Havasu City

The $1 million contribution from Mr. and Mrs. James J. Santiago, longtime Lake Havasu City residents and principal owners of Beachcomber Resort and Island Suites, brought the campaign total today to slightly above the $2 million level – the minimum amount required for ASU to proceed with the project.

Havasu Foundation for Higher Education launched the Campaign for the Colleges@ASU in Lake Havasu City in March, with a preliminary goal of $2 million to fund Phase I of the renovation of the former campus of Daytona Middle School. Santiago’s gift took the campaign to that threshold. “I have no doubt that Mr. Santiago’s contribution, along with the incredible support demonstrated by other residents and businesses in Lake Havasu City, will enable the campaign to reach a fundraising level well over the $2 million requirement,” said campaign co-chair Jo Navaretta. “We are now well on our way to a fall 2012 opening of the Colleges@ASU in Lake Havasu City,” added co-chair Nello Ruscitti.

Read more Here
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  #115  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2011, 2:50 PM
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^Thats good news and it looks like a good location too. The old Middle School seems to be just about 2 blocks behind Lake Havasu's main thoroughfare--which actually has lots of street fronting retail and is done like a classic Main Street. Having students to help the businesses in that area will be great. Hopefully eventually it grows into Lake Havasu State or whatever and can be a nice teaching college.
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  #116  
Old Posted Sep 9, 2011, 6:21 AM
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ASU Enrollment Records

Preliminary enrollment figures, issued on the 21st day of the Fall 2011 semester, indicate that ASU has reached a record 72,250 undergraduate and graduate students.

ASU’s new undergraduate student enrollment – nearly 9,300 first-time freshman and 6,800 transfer students – topped 16,000 students for the first time in university history.

Out-of-state and international undergraduate students at ASU also hit record levels – nearly 14,700 total, with 3,300 new freshman and 2,000 new transfer students – as students from all 50 states and 127 countries were attracted to ASU’s programs.

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  #117  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2011, 7:03 AM
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YES! YES! YES!

Effort to split ASU may be revived
Some local leaders working to stop plan

by Art Thomason - Sept. 18, 2011 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic
Quote:
Four months before the next legislative session begins, government and business leaders in the West Valley and southeast Valley are working behind the scenes to head off another attempt to strip Arizona State University of its Mesa and Glendale campuses and turn them into stand-alone universities.

The idea, pitched by several legislators including Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Andy Biggs, would splinter one of the nation's largest universities and has prompted moves by influential groups and officials of the Arizona Board of Regents - the public universities' governing body - to discourage it.

The bid went nowhere last session, but at least two lawmakers say they plan to bring it back.

"I think there is probably a pretty good chance of that, but until you get into it you really don't know," said Sen. Rick Murphy, R-Glendale.

Murphy said Biggs has taken the lead in exploring ideas to turn ASU into three separate schools and that the lawmakers would gauge support for the concept among their colleagues before determining this fall whether to propose it in the form of a bill.

Biggs did not respond to telephone and e-mail requests for an interview.

"There is no bill yet, no legislation yet," Murphy said. "It's kind of in the idea or brainstorming stage."

However, he said the state needs satellite universities with more undergraduate options so most students don't have to drive to the Tempe campus "for practically everything."

"Maybe this budget crunch will force us to look for a better way for them to get a degree, but not require all the resources of a research university," he said.

"I'll get plenty of input," Murphy said. "I look forward to having these discussions, whether it's in opposition, neutral or favor. Most of the time those conversations tend to make a bill better."

But the idea of separating the university has many other Valley leaders worried. It comes at a time when the university is in the midst of constructing new academic villages on its Poly and West campuses and enhancing its international reputation as a research institution.

"We are concerned about where this seems to be going," said Michelle Rider, president and executive director of Westmarc, a coalition of the 15 communities in western Maricopa County. "This one seems to have stronger legs than other proposals in the past couple years."

The East Valley Partnership, a regional coalition of community, business, education and government leaders, is also concerned.

"There have been so many advances that have taken place at Polytechnic campus that to do anything that would change its brand, its image, its research or activities that (vice-provost and dean) Mitzi Montoya and her team are doing would be a setback for a great university," said Roc Arnett, the partnership's president.

"We are on the cusp of a large number of developments that will no doubt happen and is being carried by the momentum from what is going on at Polytechnic," he said. "That includes the university's connection with the Air Force Research Lab, possible development of unmanned aircraft systems and research to convert algae into biofuel and other constructive uses."

Arizona State University President Michael Crow alerted Mesa Mayor Scott Smith to the separation concept in a July 9 e-mail and asked for the city's support to keep ASU/Poly in Mesa.

He recounted a long list of university improvements, including $60 million in new construction of an academic village, expanded research partnerships, plans for more than 100 acres of commercial high-tech and retail development, expansion plans for academic programs, a collaborative statewide defense and aerospace lab, possible expansion of aviation training and research and a push to attract a fully international-scale student body.

"But having said that I hear from leaders that the effort to pull the Poly campus away from ASU is gaining steam," Crow said.

In an interview with The Republic, Crow said he is "perplexed" by any university-restructuring concept in view of the efficiencies and cost savings that have been achieved at ASU over the last nine years.

The university reduced three administrations into one while producing some of the nation's top degree programs and assembling some of the best scholars to teach them, he said.

Despite widespread budget cuts, ASU's academic star has been rising amid international recognition for research.

Even so, Murphy and state Sen. Linda Gray, R-Phoenix, said that some lawmakers are interested in exploring a plan drafted by an ASU student as part of his master's degree thesis to restructure the Arizona University System.

Sanjeev Ramchandra, who also is a part-time mathematics teacher at Mesa Community College, proposes the merger of ASU West and Polytechnic campuses into an independent, "medium-cost" and "moderate research" state university housed at the Polytechnic campus.

"This then frees up the West campus to transform itself into an independent, low-cost and non-research state university that offers its own complete set of workforce-oriented, academic degree programs on-site," he said.

The Tempe campus would remain a "high-cost, heavy-research" university, and the downtown Phoenix campus would continue as an extension of the Tempe campus, according to Ramchandra's plan.

He has been touting the concept for two years and said it offers "greater accessibility and affordability to a university education for many more Arizona residents."

Board of Regents member Mark Killian of Mesa, a former state lawmaker and speaker of the Arizona House of Representatives, said he met with Biggs recently to discourage separating the university.

"From a parochial standpoint you can say that we need our own university in a given community," he said. "But we can't afford to be parochial right now."
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  #118  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2011, 10:52 AM
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^^^^ Its mind boggling that anyone could be against such a plan. It allows ASU to become the high caliber research school it ought to be. It provides cheaper education options for the Valley. It creates competition, which should drive down costs (relative to inflation/increasing cost of education) and gives people more educational options instead of forcing them into a giant State megaschool.

Unfortunately if Crow, ABOR, and East & West Valley leaders are against it, it ain't going to happen. But at least the idea is out there in their now.
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  #119  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2011, 5:12 PM
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Splitting ASU? Absolutely! I always thought there were too many people at Tempe campus (15 years ago). It's certainly worse now.

The Colleges @ ASU in Lake Havasu City? Could they have come up with a worse name? Is there something wrong with Lake Havasu State?
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  #120  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2011, 8:13 PM
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It makes sense to split the schools and in fact, ASU should stop investing in its "satellite" campuses and save the money to improve and expand Tempe and Downtown. I don't see why it's so taboo to create a system similar to the UC's wherein the colleges can keep the namesake of their one-time parent institution. ASU @ Tempe and Downtown could then become "highly-selective" for admission purposes and maintain current acceptance rates and standards for the other schools. Makes too much sense I guess.
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