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  #61  
Old Posted May 11, 2013, 9:17 PM
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Originally Posted by halifaxboyns View Post
If a developer wants a relaxation for say height (if it's not governed by something like a viewplane or a 'non relaxable height limit') then - what do I get for the City?
I agree that this is better than having rigid rules, but I think that there are still a couple of problems with this approach. One problem is that developers already pay fees and property owners pay taxes to HRM, and these are supposed to cover amenities like public space. Another problem, already mentioned, is that there's a big double standard between the downtown projects where developers have to pay for a basket of goodies and suburban projects where they throw up whatever conforms to the bylaws and then HRM picks up the tab later by building necessary infrastructure like the Washmill underpass.

I'd expect developers to feel a bit cheated as long as groups like the DRC have a "what do we get?" sort of attitude. This similar to the unfairness that existed pre-HbD; special interest groups would come forward with a laundry list of demands and developers were pressured to meet them or deal with appeals. There were no clear rules, so the process was easily abused. One very important thing to keep in mind is that the DRC meeting isn't a real negotiation, it's a situation where the developer is subject to the whims of a bureaucratic "gatekeeper" authority.
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  #62  
Old Posted May 12, 2013, 6:35 PM
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The question I would ask then is what level of input does the DRC have? Are they approving authority? Or are they simply a 'referee' that has a say - but then the true development authority (development officer) has the power to simply ignore it and issue an approval?

I think there will always be that level of unfairness you mention until we get our house in order in the Regional Centre. Once that it going and humming along - then lets tackle the rest.

Ultimately, a city only has so much money to go around. So things like parks and what not should just be an automatic that the developer has to pay or contribute - so likely what you will see in the future (I would hope) is that all multi-residential development (be it in the core or the burbs) would be in this sort of form where there must be contributions to things like parks, affordable housing, etc.
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  #63  
Old Posted May 12, 2013, 7:21 PM
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It is what it is. You want variances you have to deal. That is how the system is set up now for the DH1 zone.

From complete application to approval or rejection is 60-75 days, depending on number of variances.

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  #64  
Old Posted May 13, 2013, 1:07 PM
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I understand your dislike for some of these buildings but I think this attitude is somewhat counter-productive. Sometimes cities need the mediocre buildings to absorb all the empty lots and push up land values so that nicer buildings become economically viable.
I see your point but I see things a bit differently. I think mediocre buildings are permissible in inconspicuous locations but this is an important location visible across the Commons, from different approaches and from Citadel Hill. I think that's in part where the concept of "Drum" originated - an attempt to create a signature building for a signature location - but unfortunately it was ill conceived.

Also, I don't think that a nicer building needs to be much pricier. It's a matter of the choice of architect, the vision for the building, design choices, etc. We may think of the building at Falkland and Gottingen as mediocre but it could have easily been much better with some small changes.
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  #65  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2013, 2:27 AM
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Winsby's has a 5 year lease now so this development is on hold.
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  #66  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2014, 2:48 AM
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Not sure if I missed an article over the break or not, but driving by tonight there were "Store Closing Sale" signs in every window. Will this be a go now?
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  #67  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2014, 7:31 PM
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Not sure if I missed an article over the break or not, but driving by tonight there were "Store Closing Sale" signs in every window. Will this be a go now?
I hope so! This development is exactly what Spring Garden needs more of.
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  #68  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2014, 7:45 PM
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I hope so! This development is exactly what Spring Garden needs more of.
It looks like it's tailored to a major chain clothing store. Should be interesting. It's going to take a while for all these developments to be completed and they are kind of disruptive but I bet the street will be a lot more vibrant in a couple of years. I could see it taking on a feel similar to, say, Pine Street in Seattle, but on a smaller scale.

The smaller retailers might get pushed out a bit but if they spill over to other areas like Barrington or Gottingen Street (or Queen, or South Park) the city will end up much better overall.

I hope the other side of the street along this block is redeveloped soon.
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  #69  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2014, 3:40 AM
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Winsby's will be closing on February 28th due to the owners desire to retire from the shoe business. The 5-year lease signed in October will be broken. Chedrawe has stated he is looking into his options on if to proceed with the approved project.

Source : "Iconic Spring Garden Retailer Is Closing" - AllNovaScotia.com
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  #70  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2014, 4:15 AM
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Winsby's will be closing on February 28th due to the owners desire to retire from the shoe business. The 5-year lease signed in October will be broken. Chedrawe has stated he is looking into his options on if to proceed with the approved project.

Source : "Iconic Spring Garden Retailer Is Closing" - AllNovaScotia.com
Sad to see old businesses go, and didn't find Winsby's offerings all that bad, but did find it mostly catered to an older clientele, like many of the older retail shops on SGR.

I think the future of SGR is more along the lines of KAS footwear across the street, which is a shop you might find on Bloor Street in Toronto. It's the kind of shop younger consumers will come downtown to visit, and then, once on SGR, decide to shop elsewhere on SGR and, in the future, hopefully Barrington (same reason why MEC usually leads similar outdoor gear stores to open around it).

As for Chewdrawe, what is he waiting for? He has the approval? I thought the only thing stopping him, was the risk of losing Winsby's. If that is no longer an issue, get it done.
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  #71  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 6:19 AM
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I found the "another blow to SGR" tone of the article a little weird. There does seem to be a lot of turnover in retail businesses but that it happening in many cities right now. The important thing is that developers are constructing new buildings and investing in their existing properties. There's lots of demand for people to live in the area. The other stuff will follow.

I just hope the city gets its act together now and does the streetscaping while all the other construction is happening, instead of prolonging the disruption. New construction is good but it's not good for a street to be a permanent construction zone.
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  #72  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 3:49 PM
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Sorry wrong thread

Last edited by Jonovision; Jan 9, 2014 at 6:14 PM.
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  #73  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 4:06 PM
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I found the "another blow to SGR" tone of the article a little weird. There does seem to be a lot of turnover in retail businesses but that it happening in many cities right now. The important thing is that developers are constructing new buildings and investing in their existing properties. There's lots of demand for people to live in the area. The other stuff will follow.

I just hope the city gets its act together now and does the streetscaping while all the other construction is happening, instead of prolonging the disruption. New construction is good but it's not good for a street to be a permanent construction zone.
Totally agree on all counts. On the "another blow to SGR" tone, I think that's bullcrap. But I think it's just more of the same Halifax conservatism-- no change is good. Also, Halifax provincialism, where if you have a national retailer replace one that is Halifax-only (or has been around "for years") then that is necessarily a bad thing. Zzzzzzz. I think SGR is more interesting now, and has more potential for success, than any time I've lived around here.

I do have my issues with SGR, of course. I've blasted Crombie REIT continually for poor management of Park Lane (no investment or TLC) and, particularly, the HMV space (how is this spot still vacant?).

Someone: do you know where the remaining streetscaping work is right now? Is it slated to be next? Or do we need another HRM approval? ZZzzzz...
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  #74  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 4:08 PM
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Another reminder of the public meeting coming up this Monday, January 13th regarding the changes to downtown Dartmouth and the allowable building heights. It's at 7pm in the Helen Creighton room at Alderney Landing.

I see downtown Dartmouth combined with Kings Wharf and Dartmouth Cove becoming our own little Vancouver style downtown.
Be prepared for some serious NIMBY presence. I've been to one of those Alderney meetings, and it's like a dog's breakfast of whiners, often with lengthy prepared NIMBY statements.

And they always begin this way: "I support development in downtown Dartmouth, but I cannot support this development, for the following 20209340830983 reasons... First....)"
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  #75  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 4:11 PM
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I found the "another blow to SGR" tone of the article a little weird.

The news media is inherently lazy and often too dumb to understand the real meaning of a story, so they invariably approach any occurrence as negative because they know that will get clicks/eyeballs.

For me, losing this old nondescript wood-frame building from that corner and replacing it with something modern is a great leap forward for SGR.
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  #76  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 4:20 PM
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The news media is inherently lazy and often too dumb to understand the real meaning of a story, so they invariably approach any occurrence as negative because they know that will get clicks/eyeballs.

For me, losing this old nondescript wood-frame building from that corner and replacing it with something modern is a great leap forward for SGR.
+1.

Here is the CH story from today:

http://thechronicleherald.ca/busines...nsbys-to-close

Not to rag on Winsby's, because it is a nice small business that has done well for itself on that corner, but whenever a shop closes down on SGR or Barrington, someone is inevitably quoted as calling it the loss of a "flagship" or "destination shop".

Really?

In any case, yes: that property/prime corner, can be much better utilized, with a new mixed use building, that can attract a new business with a more attractive space.
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  #77  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 5:48 PM
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Totally agree on all counts. On the "another blow to SGR" tone, I think that's bullcrap. But I think it's just more of the same Halifax conservatism-- no change is good. Also, Halifax provincialism, where if you have a national retailer replace one that is Halifax-only (or has been around "for years") then that is necessarily a bad thing. Zzzzzzz. I think SGR is more interesting now, and has more potential for success, than any time I've lived around here.
Agreed it's BS, but I actually don't think it's conservatism--in fact, I'd say that ANS and to a lesser degree other media outlets are the first to harp on stagnation or anti-development attitudes.

I think it's more about the inherent negativity of the local media (like this summer, when the Herald decried the decline of Barrington and then obliviously used a pic of Espace under construction to illustrate said decline). You see it all over the media--every time a store closes or a company lays off five people, it makes the business section, and perpetuates a relentless pessimism. I find openings and hirings and good news stories generate much less coverage.

One example would be the fact that last year's HRM murder rate was less than half of 2012's. Didn't see that reported anywhere, but as soon as 2012 wrapped, there were a bunch of news items about the sky-high homicide rate.

Sensationalism is a typical media thing, but in Nova Scotia, there seems to be a persistent negativity that accompanies it.

In any case, a decades old biz closing because the owners are retiring isn't a story of failure--it's a story of a venerable business that provided a lifelong income and employment, right?
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  #78  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 7:22 PM
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Agreed it's BS, but I actually don't think it's conservatism--in fact, I'd say that ANS and to a lesser degree other media outlets are the first to harp on stagnation or anti-development attitudes.

I think it's more about the inherent negativity of the local media (like this summer, when the Herald decried the decline of Barrington and then obliviously used a pic of Espace under construction to illustrate said decline). You see it all over the media--every time a store closes or a company lays off five people, it makes the business section, and perpetuates a relentless pessimism. I find openings and hirings and good news stories generate much less coverage.

One example would be the fact that last year's HRM murder rate was less than half of 2012's. Didn't see that reported anywhere, but as soon as 2012 wrapped, there were a bunch of news items about the sky-high homicide rate.

Sensationalism is a typical media thing, but in Nova Scotia, there seems to be a persistent negativity that accompanies it.

In any case, a decades old biz closing because the owners are retiring isn't a story of failure--it's a story of a venerable business that provided a lifelong income and employment, right?
Certainly can't argue that local rags love reporting on crime. They always give it front page or inside front page location.

Leads to more negativity about downtown.

FWIW, I think the Herald's reporting on some of the new developments downtown has gotten a lot better over the last two years. Certainly presenting a more positive spin on these things. But yeah, they still love the crime stories.
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  #79  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 11:40 PM
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You can't tear this thing down fast enough. Look at the little family owned addition behind the building (slab wall with vent) hiding garbage and a cheap A/C unit.

There will be a little less vinyl when it's gone.

Poorly maintained Winsbys shoe hut:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=halif...12,219.78,,0,0

Strange windows with plank to divert snow or water?
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=halif...,,0,-5.75&z=19
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Last edited by Empire; Jan 7, 2014 at 11:56 PM.
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  #80  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2014, 2:49 AM
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Looking back at the proposed (I understand approved) design, though a little bland, if done nicely, I could easily see it accommodate a two-level space for a high end retail outfit, like H&M or Gap, etc.

Has any lazy journalist gotten a hold of Danny yet about his plans? Anything in ANS?

Or will be just continually see "Danny Chedrawe, owner of Westwoods Developements, was unable to be reached for comment"?
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