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  #81  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2015, 2:47 PM
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I am not in love with the upper sections of the tower on the side facing Quinpool - seems almost reminiscent of the awful Bedbug Towers on Barrington - but the rest looks good.
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  #82  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2015, 12:41 AM
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Sounds as though the usual "It's TOO TALL!!" suspects are out in force at the session tonight.
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  #83  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2015, 2:59 AM
Colin May Colin May is offline
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Originally Posted by curnhalio View Post
'You know who' can go 'you know what'. (expletives implied)

I don't think this will make the wind at that corner that much worse, as there are already two tall-ish buildings on the corner. Demolishing the old QEH site did improve wind patterns here a bit. Does a 28 storey building affect the wind more than a 9 storey building?
To your question - Yes, depending on how it is designed The units facing each other in the two towers will be the least attractive spaces to buy/rent.
If HRM could force the two developers to build one building and wrap it around the corner the outcome would be much more attractive, but Halifax and metro politicians in general, has always lacked the vision of how to build a city and prefer to believe that if the market is left alone they will come up with the best solution. Other well designed cities long ago new the value of a well designed streetscape. I'm told the properties on Windsor are rooming houses with future development potential which makes me wonder why HRM doesn't ask for one development for most of the block. Short answer, the Mayor and Council don't have a clue about building a city that is attractive for all. A design competition for the whole block would be an interesting exercise, and combined with a moratorium of all development on that block.
And if HRM wants more people, and more children on the peninsula why do they persist in selling off the very spaces that are suitable for new schools ?
If HRM and the province is keen to entice more people to metro surely they should start to provide first class primary education centres with 'world class' design. Show me one school in HRM which has the wow factor of the new library.
Stop electing philistines.
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  #84  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2015, 12:56 PM
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Well, the city doesn't build new schools. The province does, and what we get are low-bid structures of uninspiring design and barely acceptable utility. Of course, that is the other end of the spectrum from the overdone, extravagantly expensive library. Some balance would be nice.
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  #85  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2015, 2:16 PM
beyeas beyeas is offline
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Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
Well, the city doesn't build new schools. The province does, and what we get are low-bid structures of uninspiring design and barely acceptable utility. Of course, that is the other end of the spectrum from the overdone, extravagantly expensive library. Some balance would be nice.
I am very very curious to see how it goes with the design for the new Lemarchant Elementary School. As you say, it is the province (and not even the department of education but the department of transportation and infrastructure) who builds schools, and it seems it is done on a "template" basis. However, this new elementary school will be the first one in a long long time that will be built in an urban setting. Given that the rest of the elementary schools built in the last number if years have all been in rural or suburban settings where there are not the same space constraints, I am quite curious to see what will be done.
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  #86  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2015, 12:29 AM
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Originally Posted by beyeas View Post
I am very very curious to see how it goes with the design for the new Lemarchant Elementary School. As you say, it is the province (and not even the department of education but the department of transportation and infrastructure) who builds schools, and it seems it is done on a "template" basis. However, this new elementary school will be the first one in a long long time that will be built in an urban setting. Given that the rest of the elementary schools built in the last number if years have all been in rural or suburban settings where there are not the same space constraints, I am quite curious to see what will be done.
Going back about 10 years(?) and the 'Imagine' process of HRSB there were many people of the opinion that a school is more than a school and should include space for community use and perhaps daycare. The community use aspect would require HRM funding and a realisation that a structure that is open only for education purposes is a waste of precious resources. Talk to a community and ask all age groups what they want their money to produce.

Include a new school in the Infrastructure programme, previous Liberal governments in Nova Scotia refused to use the programme for university and school projects and Dalhousie received federal funds due to Mary Clancy, M.P. Dal put up the balance when Premier Savage, a former chairman of Dartmouth School Board refused to put any money into education projects. At the same time Savage had a row with Dave Dingwall over Dingwall's favourite project at CBU and Dingwall held up approval of Savage's pet projects until they cut a deal and a bingo hall was added to the Dartmouth Sportsplex where smoking was allowed despite the addition being named a Wellness Centre.
We can only hope that some time soon HRM and the province will make public their priority projects well in advance of political bickering and horse trading,
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  #87  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2015, 12:51 PM
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The problem with municipalities wanting schools to be used for community purposes - something that I agree can make sense if there is a need - is that they do not fund nor operate schools. The school boards run them, so after-hours use comes out of their budget. Until that fundamental problem is solved I doubt we will see much in the way of community programming.
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  #88  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2015, 6:21 AM
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I'm not really sure how this works. Citadel and Halifax West both have large auditoriums that are regularly used for non school-related events, and I've actually gone to council meetings/presentations at the new West and CPA. Maybe the P3 arrangements somehow make it easier to rent out portions of the school (if I remember right both of those auditoriums were built mostly through private fundraising) or maybe the older schools just don't have facilities that are as useful to the community (my high school, J. L. Ilsley, comes to mind. Other than maybe the gym, the kitchen facilities or the wood shop, I can't really see any spaces in it being very useful to non-students - even the soccer field wasn't very good.)
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  #89  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2015, 2:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
I'm not really sure how this works. Citadel and Halifax West both have large auditoriums that are regularly used for non school-related events, and I've actually gone to council meetings/presentations at the new West and CPA. Maybe the P3 arrangements somehow make it easier to rent out portions of the school (if I remember right both of those auditoriums were built mostly through private fundraising) or maybe the older schools just don't have facilities that are as useful to the community (my high school, J. L. Ilsley, comes to mind. Other than maybe the gym, the kitchen facilities or the wood shop, I can't really see any spaces in it being very useful to non-students - even the soccer field wasn't very good.)
I agree. I really don't see the point of this. I get the usual sentiment behind the move "give it to the community!", but for what purpose? Again, another key sentiment here is just a NIMBYism; giving these centrally located surplus sites to community groups prevents developers from building something that may bring new populations and change the neighborhood.
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  #90  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2015, 12:07 PM
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The developer is saying he will donate a whole floor of this building to the IWK for a Ronald McDonald House style accommodation:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...-iwk-1.3344642

Generous? Cynical and manipulative? Does it matter?
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  #91  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2015, 1:29 PM
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Originally Posted by portapetey View Post
The developer is saying he will donate a whole floor of this building to the IWK for a Ronald McDonald House style accommodation:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...-iwk-1.3344642

Generous? Cynical and manipulative? Does it matter?
I would say more that it is both generous and self-interested, but I don't mean that in a bad way. Having something be a win-win situation is not at all a bad thing. My question would only be wondering what exactly is being talked about, who manages it (IWK?) and who pays for its operational costs.
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  #92  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 5:25 PM
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District 7 & 8 Planning Advisory Committee will be discussing this proposal next week;

http://www.halifax.ca/boardscom/D78P...5d78pac-b1.pdf

Staff seem to be giving a passing grade but they have some concerns with the height.
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  #93  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 5:31 PM
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Really like some of the updated renderings. This looks fantastic to my eye. And it's back up to 30 stories?

I really, really hope it gets approved along with the Westwood development next door.
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  #94  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 6:05 PM
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Here's one of the renderings from the report:



I think it looks good too, and the height adds some variety.
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  #95  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 6:56 PM
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Wow, that density would really help Quinpool businesses as well.
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  #96  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 7:56 PM
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Awesome!
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  #97  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 7:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Dmajackson View Post
District 7 & 8 Planning Advisory Committee will be discussing this proposal next week;

http://www.halifax.ca/boardscom/D78P...5d78pac-b1.pdf

Staff seem to be giving a passing grade but they have some concerns with the height.
Shocked that staff are troubled by height! Can't wait until the planning office has a generational turnover.
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  #98  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 8:21 PM
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Somewhat paradoxically, contemporary planning theory tends to encourage density and mixed uses but also tends to encourage midrise (and by extension, discourage large towers - towers DO have some actual disadvantages in most contexts). So I wouldn't necessarily count on a turnover in staff resulting in 40-storey towers, although that's a possible outcome. We are getting to a point where we will have to balance height limits against the rate at which we are willing to demolish/redevelop older/smaller buildings.
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  #99  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 9:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
We are getting to a point where we will have to balance height limits against the rate at which we are willing to demolish/redevelop older/smaller buildings.
One of the weird views that I hope really will go away in the future is the idea that capping building heights leads to more stable neighbourhoods and heritage preservation. Some people even think that height limits make housing more affordable; they are confusing cause and effect. Desirable neighbourhoods tend to get shiny condo towers. Developers' power to turn undesirable neighbourhoods into expensive neighbourhoods by building towers is limited. If the Toronto condo developers all decamped to Detroit they'd go bankrupt pretty quickly.

This is a prime 30 storey building site because it's on two wide streets and there's a desire to preserve the character of the side streets. There are few candidate building sites so the heights need to be taller to achieve the same population density. Hopefully the need for more population density on the peninsula is something else that more people are starting to understand. It used to be so common in Halifax for people to demand low population density and high service levels, but they're a trade-off.
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  #100  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2016, 9:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
Somewhat paradoxically, contemporary planning theory tends to encourage density and mixed uses but also tends to encourage midrise (and by extension, discourage large towers - towers DO have some actual disadvantages in most contexts). So I wouldn't necessarily count on a turnover in staff resulting in 40-storey towers, although that's a possible outcome. We are getting to a point where we will have to balance height limits against the rate at which we are willing to demolish/redevelop older/smaller buildings.

Yeah, it isn't like young planners are gaga for towers. My read on the current planning trends is that mid-rise (i.e., what they call the human scale) is the generally preferred model, except in certain contexts.
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