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  #681  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2006, 11:21 PM
ScottG ScottG is offline
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true.....we saw how the nast off-white and blue paint job was redone in all white....so many....this is just a primer.

maybe not, im sure things will change once the planet hollywood globe sits atop the tower signifying the complete transformation (and adding to its height)
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  #682  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2006, 12:15 AM
Reverie
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The construction level is pretty steady nowadays. And it's good to see Vegas Grand finally get off the ground.


I don't know how I could of missed this article but it caught my attention while I was cleaning out some old papers.

It's LONG but a good read pertaining to the future of overall housing growth in Vegas, trends towards urbanization/high density, as well as high rises.

Singled Out? Observers say traditional one-family home subdivision may fade away

Quote:
Aug. 13, 2006
Copyright © Las Vegas Review-Journal

It's a local mainstay: The new-home subdivision with 150 single-family homes, comfortably ensconced on 6,500-acre lots behind thick cinder-block walls.

More than 71 percent of new homes sold in the Las Vegas Valley today are single-family properties, data from research firm SalesTraq show. Given that market dominance, it would seem inconceivable to consider the typical Las Vegas production-home tract an endangered species.

However, one local housing analyst predicts that sometime in the next seven years to 10 years, the lights will go out on the last traditional new single-family subdivision in the valley.

Steve Bottfeld, a senior analyst with Marketing Solutions, says a multitude of trends will conspire to render new single-family development obsolete within the next decade.

Area builders acknowledge the market changes that are complicating single-family development. But they're also planning adjustments in how they develop that they say could save the single-family tract.

LAND WOES, BUYING TRENDS

Key among the forces that Bottfeld said will squeeze out single-family development is a waning supply of developable local land.

Clark County's Multispecies Habitat Conservation Plan has capped future development in the county at 78,000 additional acres. The research firm Applied Analysis says builders in the county chew up 7,000 acres to 9,000 acres a year, leaving land stores of eight years to 10 years.

"We're in a situation in which buildable land is going to be in short supply," Bottfeld said.

And when any commodity is scarce, its price spikes upward.

Today's land prices already make the conventional single-family community with six homes per acre impossible to build in some parts of the valley. When property sells for $1 million an acre, "you can't put single-family homes on it," Bottfeld said. Witness a 26-acre plot in southwest Las Vegas that recently came on the market at $1.65 million per acre. The lot is zoned for 50 units per acre -- high-density attached housing.

But Bottfeld's prediction is born of more than simple real estate math.

Evolving consumer preferences and demographic trends will drive home buyers into compact, urban communities, he said.

The oldest baby boomers are turning 60 at the rate of 8,000 a day, and every seven seconds, an American turns 50. As consumers gray, Bottfeld said, they're demanding a streamlined lifestyle. The expansive suburban home, the quarter-acre lot, the pool -- all the features that made sense for young, growing families -- have become maintenance burdens to empty nesters.

In addition, a shift away from the nuclear family will bolster demand for attached housing, Bottfeld said.

Unmarried women in particular are buying homes in big numbers: The National Association of Realtors' Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers shows single women compose the second-biggest group of buyers, after married couples. Single women bought 21 percent of homes in 2005, up from 18 percent in 2004. Single men bought 9 percent of homes sold in 2005, the association reported. And a study by Fannie Mae found that single women will helm 28 percent of all U.S. households by 2010.

Bottfeld said those single women have specific housing demands: They want security, proximity to neighbors they know and a "lock-and-leave" lifestyle that allows them to travel without worrying about the lawn.

"There's a whole bunch of singles and boomers who are expressing a preference for the vertical lifestyle, providing that there is an entertainment element to wherever it is they're living," Bottfeld said.

And that entertainment aspect is key, because having recreation nearby will allow home buyers to fulfill what Bottfeld said is a 21st century dream: ditching cars and hoofing it to favorite restaurants, shops and theaters. Between rising gasoline prices and heavier traffic, driving is a chore consumers increasingly want to avoid.

"There's a frustration associated with motor vehicles," Bottfeld said. "Road rage is a relatively recent phenomenon. People really don't want to drive in traffic, and no matter how fast you build roads, you are still going to be in traffic."

The answer to those road woes? Mixed-use developments with mid-rise or high-rise housing clustered around retail and office space.

Kenneth Smith, a principal in Glen, Smith & Glen, seconded Bottfeld's summary of the consumer trends that could lead more home buyers to attached housing.

You'd expect Smith to agree with Bottfeld: Glen, Smith & Glen is developing Sullivan Square, a 16.5-acre community in southwest Las Vegas that will feature high-rises as well as brownstones and lofts. Sullivan Square's Market Street will have 25 retailers, including a café, a pub, a florist, a fish market, a bakery and a butcher.

But Smith isn't just concurring with an endorsement of his business plan; he sees shades of Bottfeld's observations in the 70 or so people who have reserved units at Sullivan Square.

Among Smith's buyers are members of generations X and Y, young adults in their 20s and 30s who would rather live in a city condo than own a single-family spread in Pahrump or Coyote Springs and commute 45 miles to work every morning. Sullivan Square is also capturing its share of professionals, including attorneys, architects, engineers, doctors and teachers, Smith said. Finally, empty nesters are a major portion of Sullivan Square's future residents.

"There is a huge shift going on across the country," Smith said. "People want to return to the heart of the city. It partly has an environmental backdrop, with people worrying about pollution and global warming from traffic. But it's also about people placing greater value on their time. If you're spending 45 minutes a day in traffic each way to and from work, that's a lot of your lifetime sitting in a car."

Bottfeld said the transition toward dense development will reduce urban sprawl and traffic congestion.

And, he added, it could even improve community spirit.

As garages and driveways replaced front porches on modern-day suburban homes, residents retreated to their backyards and spent little time meeting their neighbors. In a high-rise, ignoring the people next door is impossible. Residents see each other on the elevator, in the parking garage, at the building's coffee house.

"We could get back to something we lost in terms of borrowing that cup of sugar from your neighbor," Bottfeld said. "You're going to see a positive change in human interaction."

'THE TIPPING POINT'

Evidence shows the market is already tilting toward attached housing.

Focus Property Group is developing its Mountain's Edge master plan on 3,500 acres of southwest Las Vegas property the company bought in chunks mostly from 1997 to 2002. Focus paid $100,000 to $200,000 an acre to buy the land, and spent roughly $100,000 an acre bringing infrastructure to the site.

For Inspirada, a 2,000-acre master plan in Henderson, Focus paid about $500,000 an acre. The developer will drop an additional $250,000 per acre to install infrastructure at the community.

Those land costs are reflected in very different housing compositions.

At Mountain's Edge, about 20 percent of the homes are attached, estimated Focus Chairman and Chief Executive Officer John Ritter. At Inspirada, as many as 60 percent of the homes will be attached, he said.

"If you look at every major city that has had both the growth in (housing) demand we've had and the constrained land supply we have, that is the direction they go in," Ritter said. "New York, areas of Manhattan, San Francisco and even parts of Washington, D.C. -- those areas became closed in. I think we're on the tipping point toward that kind of lifestyle."

Yet, Ritter and other local builders add that they believe new single-family home tracts have a future in the Las Vegas Valley beyond the next decade.

Klif Andrews, president of Pardee Homes' Nevada division, said millions of Americans remain invested in the suburban format that prevailed across the country following World War II.

"I strongly believe that the American dream still includes a backyard, a garage and a house that's in a suburban neighborhood," Andrews said. "That's an enduring dream for Americans, and I don't think it will go away. It's just getting tougher to make it work."

How much tougher?

Andrews said Pardee requires parcels of at least 40 acres to build a conventional single-family subdivision. But it's become virtually impossible to find privately owned plots of 40 acres or more; Andrews said he hasn't bought that large a piece of property inside Las Vegas in three years. Pardee is mostly living on land it bought at least three years ago, and it has a three-year supply of acreage to build on.

Pardee is also planning to unveil its first local attached communities in 2007, when it breaks ground on townhomes at Inspirada and flats at its Eldorado master plan in North Las Vegas.

But those attached communities don't mean Pardee will abandon the local single-family market altogether. The builder delivers about 1,600 new single-family homes annually in Las Vegas, a number Andrews said would likely fall to about 500 units in the next seven years to 10 years as land remains difficult to find.

To replace the lost inventory, Pardee is heading to Coyote Springs, a planned community 50 miles north of Las Vegas. Pardee is under contract to develop 10,000 single-family homes in the master plan's first phase.

Andrews said such exurbs could ease the pressure to go vertical in the valley.

"In virtually every other market across the country, commuting is a consistent solution for urban issues, whether it's high housing costs or congestion," he said. "You can look to Southern California, Phoenix, and markets in Texas and Florida, where an ocean of buyers commuting from exurban locations to urban workplaces continues to occur."

Executives of Standard Pacific Homes are also banking on sustained interest in single-family homes in Southern Nevada.

The California builder entered the Las Vegas market in May, when it began building Mountain Shadows, a 77-lot community of single-family homes in North Las Vegas. Standard Pacific is planning three additional single-family subdivisions across the valley, and is partnering with four other local builders to develop a North Las Vegas master plan on 2,675 acres of land formerly owned by the Bureau of Land Management.

"To say all the builders will simply fold up their tents and go away -- that's not going to happen," said Jim Cerrone, Standard Pacific's local vice president of sales and marketing. "It's going to be extremely tough. We're going to have to be a lot more creative, and it may mean revitalizing older neighborhoods. I think the market will adjust."

Yet even Standard Pacific will wade into the attached market in 2007 when it starts building townhouses and condominiums in northeast Las Vegas and Henderson. Cerrone said the builder's product mix will ultimately consist of 35 percent attached homes and 65 percent single-family homes. Rather than land pressures or demographic shifts, though, an emphasis on assembling a diverse portfolio is driving Standard Pacific's local entry into attached housing, Cerrone said.

"Most of us grew up in single-family homes, and we want our kids to have the same lifestyle," Cerrone said. "When our kids have kids, they're going to want yards, not a balcony on a 31-story building. And where there's a market (for single-family homes), we'll serve that market."

Added Andrews: "Someone has to convince me that most Americans who are given the choice wouldn't prefer a detached home with a yard and a little bit of space between the houses. We know Americans prefer that, because they'll pay more for a single-family home. People typically get forced into attached housing. They don't choose it."

SAVING THE DETACHED HOME?

Builders don't intend to let detached homes just fade away.

They're tweaking their approach to single-family neighborhoods, looking to impart some of the benefits that come with vertical mixed-use projects.

Home sites will shrink: Builders will fit as many as 10 single-family homes on an acre, up from four homes to six homes per acre half a decade ago, Ritter said.

Those lot specs will require builders to abandon backyards. But in place of rear yards, developers will set aside property for community parks, shopping centers and open space. Rather than planting public areas at the outskirts of a subdivision, planners will place parks and retail at the heart of a community, Ritter said, allowing residents to stash the car in the garage for the weekend and walk to their favorite shops, ball fields and eateries. And those cinder-block walls that ring newer subdivisions in Las Vegas? They won't grace future detached-home developments.

At Inspirada, for example, Focus is looking to include public spaces within a quarter-mile of every home. The master plan's 300-acre town center will house retailers ranging from grocery stores and dry cleaners to boutique clothiers.

Standard Pacific's Mountain Shadows will have a community park at its core. Houses encircling the park will have view fences rather than block walls, so residents can watch their children and greet their neighbors.

And Andrews said Pardee's Coyote Springs communities will incorporate neighborhood parks and open home sites that allow residents to "interact and mingle."

Ritter said consumers can also expect builders to de-emphasize garages, placing them in the back or at the side of the home. Houses will move closer to the curb, and living rooms and family rooms will look out on the street to open up homes to the neighborhood. Streets will narrow to help slow traffic.

The effort to replace yards with community parks will help single-family builders retain some of the consumers gravitating toward vertical communities, Ritter said, as young professionals and empty nesters looking for a low-maintenance lifestyle near retail, restaurants and entertainment find options in newer detached-home communities.

"We don't have to get rid of single-family homes to have intelligent, interactive communities," Andrews said.

Builders and analysts also say potential renegotiations of the county's Multispecies Habitat Conservation Plan and the Bureau of Land Management's disposal boundary -- a ring around the valley beyond which the agency won't sell acreage to private interests -- could forestall the demise of the conventional single-family home.

But Bottfeld said Manhattanization -- which he said refers not merely to the building of high-rises, but to the urbanization of broad swaths of the valley -- is inevitable. Even existing single-family communities could fall to the trend in 40 years to 50 years, he said, as developers buy up pockets of detached housing and convert them to mid-rise or high-rise communities.

Ritter predicted attached housing will make up 60 percent or more of the new-home market in about 10 years. Though he stopped short of forecasting an all-vertical new-home market, he said Las Vegas will take on a decidedly different skyline in coming years.

"It's a very natural progression to a city where people are relating to their neighbors and using public neighborhood spaces," Ritter said. "There's no question that, 10 years from now, attached housing will be an acceptable lifestyle in Las Vegas in those areas that provide for good outdoor public spaces and commercial amenities."
Yung getting wrecking ball ready for Trop

Quote:

BY DAVID MCKEE
LV Business Press

Once Columbia Sussex CEO William Yung claims ownership to the Tropicana, he plans on taking a wrecking ball to the sprawling, low-rise buildings that cover many of the site's 34 acres. In an interview with "Casino Enterprise Management," Yung announced that "our plans are basically to keep the two hotel towers and showroom, and then pretty much get rid of everything else."

As part of a $2 billion overhaul, Yung would erect a 3,000-room Tropicana, another 3,000 rooms branded to "Hilton or Marriott or something like that," to be followed by a condo tower or a third, 3,000-room hotel. An additional 1.5 million square feet of development would be one-third retail, one-third meeting space and "various commercial stuff" filling out the remainder.

Non-gaming amenities would be expected to drive more than half the property's revenue. The Tropicana's casino is currently on pace for $62 million-plus in 2006 revenues. Yung's target for future Trop casino intake is between $160 million and $200 million annually.
Columbia Sussex CEO William Yung has bold plans for the Tropicana.

"We're not really expecting that much out of it," Yung told CEM Editor Matt Connor. "We'll make our money on the rest of the stuff."

One way that Yung plans to do so is to have Columbia Sussex's hotel operations run everything but the casino itself. Hotel housekeeping staff will double as cleaning staff for the casino proper, he told the magazine. "The hotel cleans the casino for them and does everything else ... 75 (percent) to 80 percent of the infrastructure and the jobs are done on the hotel side," said Yung, a former industrial engineer with the Jergens soap company. That regimen will be imposed on all four Aztar properties being bought. "We've done it everywhere," he said.

Informed of Yung's comments, one casino industry veteran groaned, "If you're going to own a Strip property, don't run it as a grind joint."

Kevin Kline, Culinary Union staff director, added that the Tropicana has an existing contract that includes a successorship clause that would bind Columbia Sussex to the terms of the current collective bargaining agreement. New owners would have to negotiate any changes.

Noting that the Tropicana would be Columbia Sussex's largest casino-hotel, Kline remarked, "once they get in there they'll see there needs to be a full-time workforce that cleans the casino and a full-time workforce that cleans the rooms."

Columbia Sussex also owns the Westin Casuarina, one block off the Strip, a non-union property. Asked if the Culinary would try to unionize the Westin when the collective bargaining agreement is up for renewal next year, Kline said, "We're right now focused on the Tropicana project."

The Westin employs distinct cleaning staffs for its guest rooms and public areas, respectively, said Director of Sales and Marketing Sandra Horvath. She added that she couldn't think of an area in the hotel-casino in which staffers double up on hotel- and casino-related tasks.

In addition to executing the Aztar buyout, Yung is also pursuing two casino projects in Louisiana. He is also seeking casino concessions in Kentucky and Pennsylvania. His rivals for the Keystone State project include Las Vegas Sands.

Last edited by Reverie; Aug 29, 2006 at 12:20 AM.
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  #683  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2006, 1:59 PM
ScottG ScottG is offline
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over 9 thousand rooms?!
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  #684  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2006, 11:07 PM
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isn't that overkill? to dump 9000 rooms into whats there and on the way up?? by the way, how many rooms are there currently in vegas? how many are U/C?
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  #685  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2006, 2:37 AM
Reverie
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Well for starters...

*25,000 added hotel rooms are likely to be built in the next four years

*75,000 to 80,000 condominium units that are also likely to be built within the Strip area.


Citycenter seems to be on a roll. It looks like from what I can tell to be on the 2nd on maybe 3rd floor already. wow.

Check out the updated citycenter site for some new renders of the mixed use area and towers.

http://www.projectcitycenter.com/



Also some new updates on the monorail.

Quote:
Aug. 29, 2006
Copyright © Las Vegas Review-Journal

Major expansion plans are in the works for the Las Vegas Monorail to help relieve traffic congestion along the resort corridor, including a hookup with the airport down Swenson Street and new stations that will link all four of the Strip's major convention centers for the first time.

The company's plans, which are still being worked on, include adding at least five new stations as well as a series of connections that would link the Las Vegas Monorail to properties on the west side of the Strip, Las Vegas Monorail Co. President Curtis Myles said.
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With the new stations, the monorail will link more than 6 million square feet of exhibit and meeting space, including for the first time the Sands Expo and Convention Center, the Mandalay Bay Convention Center and the convention facilities planned at Boyd Gaming's Echelon Place, enhancing Las Vegas' role as the convention capital of the country, he said.

The Las Vegas Convention Center already has a monorail station, Myles said.

"Our future is going to be getting the airport connector and connecting the system to more resorts," Myles said.

However, even with the expansion plans, expected to be announced in the next six months, the Las Vegas Monorail stands to play a limited, although essential, role in addressing the transportation problems already afflicting the area's economic drive shaft, he said.

Myles believes any relief to traffic problems along the Strip will be limited, partially because at least 25,000 added hotel rooms are likely to be built in the next four years, generating another 53,000 trips a day through the resort corridor, a 25 percent increase over the 225,000 cars that travel along the resort corridor now every day.

Add the 75,000 to 80,000 condominium units that are also likely to be built in the area, and traffic could actually double from its current level.

The current monorail plan is to run a connector line down Swenson Street to McCarran International with spurs to Terminal 1, the main terminal today, and Terminal 3, which will be built north of the D gates, Myles said.

Airport spokeswoman Elaine Sanchez said plans for Terminal 3 are near completion and the new building should open in mid-2011.

Earlier plans had envisioned a link-up between the MGM Grand terminus and the A gates, but Federal Aviation Administration regulations and the cost of underground tunnels made that cost prohibitive, Myles said.

Officials with the $650 million monorail, which opened in 2004, have been working with the airport and the FAA on a study of the plan that they will each have to approve, he said.

The connector will run along Harmon Avenue, down Paradise Road, across Tropicana Avenue and down Swenson. It is planned to include stops at the new W Las Vegas hotel and the Hard Rock Hotel and the Thomas and Mack Center, Myles said.

Despite its opposition to a station when the monorail was first planned, the Sands Expo and Convention Center also is negotiating for a new station entrance from the current Harrah's Las Vegas station.

Monorail passengers would not make a second stop at the convention center, but would exit the monorail system and enter the Sands Expo and The Venetian through a separate building.

Talks are also in the works for a likely station at Boyd Gaming Corp.'s $4 billion Echelon Place on the Stardust site north of the current Sahara monorail terminus, Myles said.

And there is still a possibility of a station at the Stratosphere although that is a less certain prospect, he said.

In addition to the new stations, Myles said talks are also in the works to integrate the monorail with the three unconnected tram systems at the MGM Mirage properties on the west side of the Strip: one from Mandalay Bay to Excalibur, one from Monte Carlo to Bellagio, which has been closed during construction of the $7 billion Project CityCenter, and a third connecting the Mirage and Treasure Island.

MGM Mirage executives declined to comment, but Myles said they are performing analyses to determine the most cost-effective way to integrate the trams with the monorail system.

MGM Mirage Chairman Terry Lanni last year talked about integrating his trams into a single system that would run from Mandalay Bay through Caesars Palace, which is owned by Harrah's Entertainment, all the way to Treasure Island.

Myles said the monorail is studying alternatives to integrate the present system with the MGM Mirage trams or even to replace the MGM Mirage systems.

Earlier plans for an east-west loop around Fashion Show Mall from the Las Vegas Convention Center have been scrapped because it would not put the most riders where they want to go, Myles said.

Brian Gordon, a principal in Las Vegas-based consultants Applied Analysis, said the added stations are critical for the success of the monorail system.

Now, the monorail runs along a short, 4-mile route from the Sahara to the MGM Grand, with stops at the Las Vegas Hilton, the Las Vegas Convention Center, Harrah's/Imperial Palace, the Flamingo/Caesars Palace, and Bally's/Paris Las Vegas.

University of Nevada, Las Vegas Professor Bill Thompson, who specializes in gaming studies, said the added stations are important to the destination, gaming companies and the community.

Moving tourists and gamblers more conveniently enhances the visitor experience, he said.

"Plus, stopping at Thomas and Mack is fantastic. That'll make Thomas and Mack part of the Strip. It'll be a rare evening when there isn't something going on there and it should cut down on street traffic and parking as well," Thompson said.

In the long run, Myles said any increased ridership could lead to reduced fares, especially if that would mean even more riders.

"If people come here and can't move around, it won't be nearly as successful as it can be and we need to do our part," Myles added.

The Las Vegas Monorail Co. has not determined how its expansion plans would be funded. However, in the past, casino operators kicked in around $20 million per station.

Analysts, who declined to comment until they see how any bond financing is structured, anticipate stronger support from the airport and from MGM Mirage, once arrangements are finalized.

They said with support like that, it should not be too difficult to float a new bond offering.

A state guarantee or continued nonprofit status, each of which could be controversial, also would help, they said.

Greg Borgel, owner of consulting firm Moreno and Associates, said monies generated by casinos on the Strip will simply have to be used for transportation improvements, or visitors will face unacceptable congestion.

The monorail has struggled to gain riders since opening, with ridership far less than the 50,000 daily riders its backers first forecast.

The goal is for the system to carry 15 million to 20 million riders a year by 2016, Myles said, which will amount to about 10 percent of the rapidly increasing visitors moving about the resort corridor.

The company has yet to produce a profit and its bond rating has been reduced to "junk" status, though deep cash reserves have kept the system afloat so far.

Last edited by Reverie; Aug 30, 2006 at 3:04 AM.
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  #686  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2006, 7:38 PM
future29 future29 is offline
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good news about the monorail. i still think a train/bus line down the middle of the strip will be needed eventually. but this is a start. i am not a fan of monorail but any kind of public transportation is better than none.

also, firt time ive seen that city center website. good to know they are keeping the name City Center. i was always wondering if they would leave the project name on there and i guess they have. it would be wierd calling it anything else.

Last edited by future29; Aug 30, 2006 at 7:59 PM.
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  #687  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2006, 10:47 PM
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hate to break it to you all but the word on the street over a week ago is that Fontainbleau was cancelled.
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  #688  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2006, 11:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tumbleweed
hate to break it to you all but the word on the street over a week ago is that Fontainbleau [sic] was cancelled.
Sad if true, but you don't post count to establish any credibility just yet. Turnberry certainly has track record of local sucess (Turnberry Place I-IV completed, Turberry Towers I-II under construction, MGM Signature I complte, II-III U/C, and Town Square) and the money to build whatever they want at the site. If it's not the Fontainebleau, I'm sure it will be something even bigger.
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  #689  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 2:33 AM
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ugh I hope so. Fontainebleau is not the first project to bite the dust on that site (London casino). They need to get rid of any desert patches left on the strip. It shouldn't have barren spots like that.
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Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 6:46 AM
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.

Last edited by tumbleweed; Jul 18, 2007 at 6:13 AM.
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  #691  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 7:15 AM
GeorgeLV GeorgeLV is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tumbleweed
eh youre right i dont have the cred... i am just a lowly architect working on the design of one of the largest resort/casino projects on the strip...
i would rather hear that montreux was cancelled... what a joke that place will be.
I'll take 62 floors of derivative design over the Frontier. (Of course if they change their mind and build a hip frost white/silver glass curtain wall tower that nicely balances out the Trump tower(s) I wouldn't complain either.)
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  #692  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 7:45 AM
future29 future29 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tumbleweed
eh youre right i dont have the cred... i am just a lowly architect working on the design of one of the largest resort/casino projects on the strip...
i would rather hear that montreux was cancelled... what a joke that place will be.
would this have anything to do with Harrah's plans? if so, when will be able to see them?
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  #693  
Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 4:12 PM
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ok thats dumb - i know (and work with) several people that are on the fountainblue. how can it just pop up dead? thats silly... i will highly doubt that news
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Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 5:24 PM
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anyways in the news today:

Riviera Sale Vetoed By Shareholders
The lowball bid for the aging Riviera Hotel & Casino by Riviera Holdings Corp. was vetoed by shareholders today. The $426 million dollar buyout offer has been the subject of stockholder anger since the takeover was announced earlier this year.

The Riviera will continue to operate as-is for the forseeable future. Gaming industry rumor mill has numerous companies standing in the lurch to snap up the 25 acre parcel on the north end of the strip.
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Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 9:48 PM
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forgive me if i am wrong. my source was pretty good though. i sort of heard they called everyone in and asked for the last bill... yes turnberry was involved but i do not think it is solely their project? i posted to sort of see if anyone else had heard the same...
kind of a shame about the Riviera, what a dog that place is.
Not involved in harrahs project, i am as curious as you are as to what is going on down there.
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Old Posted Aug 31, 2006, 10:36 PM
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the riviera has been switching hands for a while, seems like a bunch of rich fat guys are just swapin stocks (trump once has 10percent of shares) the riv COULD be a great potential buy, with coverage from the strip to paradise.

That and sahara, but i'd put money on riveria before sahara. i'd think the riv (and maybe circus circus) would get some plaster before sahara does.

sky and grand vacation club has really made that block nice(r) slowly slowly the stratosphere will actually be part of 'the strip' and not just LV BLVD
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Old Posted Sep 1, 2006, 12:29 AM
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Cool Number of Las Vegas Condos at the Strip

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reverie
Well for starters...

*25,000 added hotel rooms are likely to be built in the next four years

*75,000 to 80,000 condominium units that are also likely to be built within the Strip area.

Also some new updates on the monorail.
Where do these stats come from? Mars? It's numbers like these that are causing buyer caution for Las Vegas. We track this data weekly and our count shows 895 residential condos and 1407 condo-hotel units will exist in the prime Strip area at end of 2006. At the end, of 2007 that number grows to 1622 residential condos and 1983 condo-hotel units. 75,000 condos isn't gonna happen in Las Vegas and we need to get the media to stop creating hysteria with these off the wall numbers. Miami with 50,000 condos yes but not the prime Strip area of Las Vegas.

If someone is counting the so called PLANNED numbers those are called DREAMERS. More get cancelled than built so let's quote real measurable numbers instead.
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  #698  
Old Posted Sep 1, 2006, 2:34 AM
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this is cool. streamline buried a time capsul last month.....

http://www.manhattanization.com/news...ng-history.rub
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  #699  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2006, 1:16 AM
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The Stratosphere Camera has returned, but only to be stuck in one position...

As you can See Hilton Grand Vacations Seems to be completed, Allure looks tall along with Sky, Trump also looks great.
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  #700  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2006, 1:57 AM
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Updates
Here is another one of my Update Compilations

World View Towers
WPH Architecture updated their World View Towers page, but it looks interactive, but is not. Too bad you cant enlarge those bottom renderings.


Stanhi Completley Redesigned
Looks like the smaller version is going to be built instead....But Still looks great!! I think I prefer the new design


Spanish View, all 3 towers under construction
According to this pic, are all towers under construction now.


Majestic Opening 2009
Delayed Another year, according to the official website.

One Las Vegas + World-class boutique hotel?
One Las Vegas, now has 7 Towers in the project, two Modern World-class boutique hotel towers have been added and will be located right next to Las Vegas Boulevard.


One Las Vegas Construction Rising Fast
Tower One and Two are well under construction,


Panorama Lookin Good
Tower One looks great! Tower Two Topped Off, Tower Three Underway.


Sandhurst Dead??
I'm not sure if it is, but the official website is one of those "fake" advertising websites.
http://www.sandhurstlv.com/home.htm

Above Sky
Sky has some great views, Shots from the top:


Best For Last:


Thats all for now
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