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  #281  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2007, 2:44 PM
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DETROIT, MI — Wayne State’s South University Village, hailed as the first major market-rate residential project of its kind in Detroit in more than 30 years, is about to become a reality. On March 21, 2007 Grand Rapids-based developer, Prime Development, and the University will break ground at 3:30 p.m. on the $36 million residential and retail establishment and parking structure.

Located on the former site of the old Vernors ginger ale factory, South University Village will be a major commercial corridor marked by exciting shops and restaurants, state-of-the-art residential facilities and a thriving gateway to the Wayne State University campus.

Studio One Apartments, LLC will build and finance the new 155,000 square-foot five-story mixed-use building -- of which 26,217 square-foot is first-floor commercial plus four levels of market rate residential rental units -- projected to cost $20 million. The University will build and finance a four level parking garage –projected to cost $15.9 million—to serve the needs of the general public, the residential/retail complex and the university. The planned completion dates and openings are set for spring/summer of 2008. The project, including the residential/retail building and public parking structure will be located on four acres on the west side of Woodward and the south side of Forest, between Canfield and Forest, immediately north of The Whitney Restaurant. The parking deck and apartment building will be connected, enabling residents to park and walk to their building.

Phase Two will add another $20 million of new construction in 2010-2012 with a second five-story apartment or condominium project along Canfield just west of The Whitney Restaurant. Thus, South University Village represents more than a $50 million investment in the city of Detroit over the next five years.

According to Wayne State University President Irvin D. Reid, South University Village highlights Wayne State’s role as a lead partner in the development of Midtown and the revitalization of Detroit. “South University Village will create 195 temporary construction-related jobs and approximately 65 new jobs associated with the bank, retail operations and parking structure,” Reid noted. “This is a significant achievement in the history of our city and a model for the economic benefits of public-private partnerships in our state.”

Gov. Jennifer Granholm believes Wayne State serves as a model for how research institutions are helping shape Michigan’s economy. “Wayne State is helping to drive our state’s 21st economy forward by educating students and conducting cutting edge research,” Granholm said. “Now the university is, once again, demonstrating just how valuable it can be in shaping a vibrant community with economic development projects that are building on the successful Tech Town project.”

Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick concurred, citing the infusion of investment that South University Village attracted from the Western side of the state. “The fact that a Grand Rapids-based developer chose to invest major dollars and resources into this project demonstrates that business opportunities abound for companies across the state that have yet to do business here.”

Marcel Burgler, principal of Prime Development, noted that, in addition to recognizing economic opportunity, he and his partners were welcomed by the city. “Wayne State, the Mayor’s office and the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC) went to great lengths to make developing Studio One Apartments a painless endeavor,” he said. “More over, extensive market research proved to us that there is a great demand in the city of Detroit for high quality rental apartments. We expect to be very successful.”

“There is great potential for South University Village,” added David Egner, president of the Hudson-Webber Foundation, which funded the initial feasibility study for the project. “South University Village made sense as a property that filled a void for much-needed housing, public parking and retail,” he noted. “Moreover, it represents a sound economic investment for all parties involved.”

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), the DEGC, TAKTIX, a Detroit-based real estate consulting company, and Prime Development, as well as private and public corporations and foundations, shared the vision that led to the efforts to make South University Village happen. “TAKTIX worked with Wayne State on the plans for the old Vernor’s site to accelerate the university’s master plan to provide market-rate residential housing on campus for faculty, staff and the community at large,” said TAKTIX principal Larry Marantette. “In this way, we and the other South University Village partners are contributing to a vibrant Midtown.”

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) granted approval for Brownfield tax credits to support the South University Village project last December. Since that time, Prime Development has confirmed Fifth Third Bank as an anchor tenant and is working diligently to secure other retailers to service the $20 million residential apartment and retail establishment on Woodward and the supporting WSU public parking structure on Forest (Phase One).

“We believe in Wayne State’s ability to transform Midtown into a thriving residential and retail center,” noted Gregory Kosch, president and CEO of Fifth Third Bank Eastern Michigan. “Fifth Third is growing and we’re here to stay. Upon learning of South University Village we jumped on the chance to solidify our roots in this growing community with a substantial financial investment and a bank branch and lending office right in the complex.”

According to the Michigan Department of Transportation, traffic on Woodward at the site is 23,500 vehicles per day. Midtown Detroit, in particular, has experienced more than $1.6 billion in new residential and commercial construction over the past ten years, according to the University Cultural Center Association.

Wayne State University is a premier institution of higher education offering more than 350 academic programs through 11 schools and colleges to more than 33,000 students.

http://www.media.wayne.edu/release.php?id=2529
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  #282  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2007, 12:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hudkina View Post
Come on Michi. It's almost spring! We need another update!
Okok! Spring is here at 8:o'something this pm, and it is 8:15 as I type this. Am I on the ball or what?

We'll start in the urbs.


The windows at MidMed everyone's been complaining about on detroityes.


If you're going to own a car and live here, this is where you park.


As of Sunday, March 18, 2007
Hello Greektown Casino storage unit.




:repeat


From the not-so-traveled north side of Greektown.


The orb of Ste. Mary's is to blame.


These columns are for the hotel tower.


Good Grief! That's like level 13 up there! Let's hope they don't forget to install the elevators.


Front entrance of the Vinton is progressing near completion.




The 2 inches left of the Detroit Commerce Building. As of today, it is a part of our history.


The replacement has been catching the eyes of passersby.


Count yourself lucky: A never before seen picture of Detroit.


It was a nice (but frigid) day.


Die, bi*ch!


Another never before seen...only to be in existance temporarily.


? (the day after St. Patty's)


This is downtown's first furniture company: MEZZANINE.


Bee-Boo!


Mmmkay...Intermission to Windsor. This thing does not grow vertically. It will be the city's new tallest. (Second hotel tower to Ceasars somethingsomething Windsor Casino).


And this thing has been sitting without a face for months now too. Hello Windsor! You aren't Detroit!


There will be a ceremony in the spring (which is now) for the grand opening of Rivard Plaza, just east of the Renaissance Center on the East Riverfront.


Making Detroit a lovely city is the new Michigan Welcome Center and Mercado at the Ambassador Bridge Customs Plaza on the Southwest side. It looks very nice.


The two buildings here comprise the project.


A zoom out.


The historic preservation project at Vernor and ____ in Mexicantown. This area of town should be applauded for embarking on a large number of preservation projects. Way to go SW side!!


Yawn. The Motor City from the train station.


The Motor City from my apartment.


The only thing going on in Grosse Pointe these days is this duck.


In-bound from the Pointes, I came across this project on Jefferson. I'm sure you guys know what it is, but I do not. I was surprised to see windows on a large structure in a part of town where most large structures do not have any. This is around Jefferson/Dickinson. Somebody please enlighten me.






Liquor store anyone? You have a choice of about 5,000 on Jefferson alone.


AND FINALLY...The site of the highly-anticipated South University Village project! I drove by there today on my bike on my way home from work and noticed yellow tape sectioning off the area for tomorrow's official ground breaking ceremonies at 3:pm.

As long as I'm at this location, which may not be for much longer, I will post periodic updates, given the speed or lack-there-of of the progress.


Rendering:
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  #283  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2007, 12:59 AM
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Oops! D/P
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  #284  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2007, 1:14 AM
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Michi, that apartment building on the Far Eastside was opened as the 524-room Savarine Hotel, and held on, in fact, until the early 1990's when it was convereted into low-income apartments, which fell into major disrepair before it was shut down, entirely, in 2004. It's going to be apartments, again.

It's being converted to 118 market-rate apartment units with groundfloor retail/commercial. Better yet, a local company, Urban Innovation Group, is doing the conversion, so all of this money is staying in town. I hope you keep up on this one so we can see it when it opens. It really is a strange building that sticks out like a sorethumb since so much around it (particularly, behind it) has been bulldozed.

BTW, Eric, please post these in the My Photos photo section on the forum. People would love to see these.

One last observation is that the Fifth Royal Oak looks so much fatter than it was rendered. It needs a diet.
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  #285  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2007, 1:51 PM
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super as usual michi.

I'll be in le detroit this weekend, keep an eye out.
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  #286  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2007, 2:45 PM
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great updates.
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  #287  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2007, 11:41 PM
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I can't wait until that WSU project gets started. Woodward through Midtown is really starting to become a true urban corridor.
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  #288  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2007, 12:27 AM
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Capitol Park targeted for revitalization
Consultant firm hired for $50,000
March 21, 2007

BY JOHN GALLAGHER

FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER

Detroit’s Downtown Development Authority took the first step Wednesday toward a hoped-for revitalization of the city’s Capitol Park district.

Located between Woodward Avenue and Washington Boulevard, the small enclave is named for being the site of Michigan’s first state capitol in the 19th Century. In recent years, seriously rundown and the site of many abandoned buildings, it has been best known as the location of the downtown bus terminus.

But with bus operations moving in 2008 to the planned Rosa Parks Transit Center, the city hopes to revive Capitol Park.

On Wednesday, the DDA agreed to hire the Detroit consulting firm Katherine Beebe and Associates to create a preliminary reinvestment strategy for the district.

The contract with the firm will cost $50,000, paid for out of DDA planning funds.

The work will take four months, after which the DDA and city planners expect to create specific development proposals.

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All I have to say is if this can only get under way after the terminal moves, it's going to be years away if they don't get crackin on the new Rosa Parks Terminal. I seriously don't understand the intensity of the technicalities in so many Detroit development cases. What is the hold up?
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  #289  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2007, 2:02 AM
hudkina hudkina is offline
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We could probably have given the DDA the same information without the $50,000 pricetag.
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  #290  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2007, 5:00 AM
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I will be coming to Detroit this summer to visit family. Grew up there went to Cody High but have lived in Seattle for the last 30 years. There has been a real building boom going out here, but have always hoped Detroit would get another chance to reclaim some of its glory. Finally it looks like there are the beginnings of a pulse. It is really exciting to see what is beginning to happen there. I have been wondering what the height restrictions are there. It would be great to see a 600'+ structure go up. Something that would be iconic and would really get the ball rolling. Saving the old highrises that have real character is wonderful to see happening. Being proud of its history but really trying to create something new where it can shake off the image of the last 35 years I see as an exciting opportunity. There are a lot of us expatriates of ths city who are rooting for it to happen.
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  #291  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2007, 3:27 AM
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I'm not sure there are any local height restrictions besides the general economic slump.
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  #292  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2007, 6:13 AM
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Speaking about height limits, there is only one height restriction I know of, and it's one I just discovered a week or so ago, and probably the only one in Detroit. The height limit for the Near-East Riverfront is 110' south of Jefferson.
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  #293  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2007, 12:40 PM
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Detroit Film Center to move to Eastern Market, 1347 E. Fisher Freeway to be renovated
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/a pps/p...3230313/-1/toc
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  #294  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2007, 4:45 PM
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Buyers snatch up condominiums in @water Lofts in Detroit


March 26, 2007

BY JOHN GALLAGHER

FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER

Larry and Maureen Allen, empty nesters from Shelby Township, say their neighbors think they're crazy.

But the Allens were among those lining up Sunday to buy one of the first units in the planned @water Lofts project, the first condo building planned for Detroit's east riverfront, where cement silos long stood.

"We'd love to be on the river, and it's an opportunity that we didn't think we were going to get," Larry Allen, a Chrysler engineer, said at the sales event in the Renaissance Center.

Added Maureen: "We're taking a chance, and it's worth it."

The Allens plan on selling their 3,000-square-foot house in the suburbs to buy their 1,300-square-foot condo with a view of the Detroit River and Belle Isle. Their unit will cost $389,000.

@water Lofts (pronounced "Atwater") should be ready for occupancy in late 2008.

Suburbanites were well-represented among buyers at this first sales event.

Edwin Brown, a federal government worker, will give up his house in Harper Woods for a new riverside condo, for which he's paying about $350,000.

"I always wanted to stay down on the river," he said. "I think we kind of undervalue here in Detroit actually having a view of the river and also a view of the international border."

Dwight Belyue, the Detroit-based developer building @water Lofts, said he needs to presell about half the planned 225 units before he can break ground. With deposits taken on about 40 units Sunday, Belyue said he expects to have enough sold to start building in June.

"I'm pretty happy so far," he said.

George Jackson, Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick's chief development officer, said a transformation of the near east riverfront from cement silos to recreational and residential was finally taking place.

"We've been talking about it probably for about 40 years," he said. "The vision is about to happen."

Contact JOHN GALLAGHER at 313-222-5173 or gallagher@freepress.com.



http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/a...03260326&imw=Y
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  #295  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2007, 8:14 PM
hudkina hudkina is offline
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This is only the first steps in creating a new vibrant Rivertown.
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  #296  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2007, 9:35 PM
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Over half of the Griswold condos sold at event
http://freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artic...ESS04/70402060
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  #297  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2007, 11:39 PM
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This makes me wonder why the downtown area hasn't seen even more "new" residential towers announced. I know that the Detroit suburban market is weak, but it seems that every new residential project has seen amazing numbers.
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  #298  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2007, 4:19 AM
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I've been wondering the same thing. I'm actually feel that downtown, even in these early stages, could support a significant residential tower. Townhomes are nice, and all, but a diverse housing market is key.
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  #299  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2007, 6:30 PM
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As I was thinking today, another new thought occurred to me and that is the argument of a grocery store. If the Woodhouse Day Spa (a luxury, not a necessity) can survive with the downtown/Midtown/New Center demographic, then what is the demand like for a grocery? Restaurants are somewhat like that of luxury as well, although they DO cater to more than just the local demographic. But things as silly as day spas, which service more local clientele, are a good indicator that those facilities serving the basic necessities can sink or float.
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  #300  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2007, 1:15 AM
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While I'm sure CVS probably wouldn't say whether or not their new downtown location is a success, I'm sure you could gauge its performance to see how successful a grocery store would be. I'm sure they sell a lot of milk and bread-type things there.
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