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  #61  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2007, 5:25 PM
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Yeah, they have. And there have been infrastructure improvements, trying to keep pace with the numbers; I guess I'm thinking more in terms of centralization. Building the core of the city. Skyscrapers, commercial space IN St. George, not spread out from St G to Ivins, Hurricane, etc...right now it feels like a succession of strip malls and parking lots covering up some absolutely gorgeous scenery.
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  #62  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2007, 10:35 PM
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"At this rate,St.George proper could easily become the largest city in Utah within the next six to ten years."

That would be crazy to think that St. George could be bigger then salt lake city. But yea with that kind of growth St. George needs to start building up. Let's get some highrise in their downtown. If P.G. and Lehi can do it then S.G, sure the hell can.
There's my 2 cents.
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  #63  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2007, 11:04 PM
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6-10 years bigger than SLC?

if they are basing that off of the 118,000 number than that's no good.. the 118k is METRO population.. the city is still at 65k or so
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  #64  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2007, 11:51 PM
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I also wonder if there isn't a built-in limit on growth...they're already exhausting the available water down there...

Then again, Las Vegas.
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  #65  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2007, 9:00 AM
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Milo McCowan beautiful designs for Anasazi Plateau


Sante Fe/Kayenta
Constructed with a contemporary Santa Fe modification. Flat roof-line works well on slopes or in the creation of multi-level homes. Principal exterior components of glass, natural stone and richly shaded stucco.



Rustic Resort
Designed in the tradition of the classic western resorts. Elements of design melt into the landscape. Tile roof above heavy natural stone walls. Principal exterior components of glass, natural stone, cedar and tile.



Modified Santa Fe
Constructed with a tile roof and exterior of natural stone and stucco. Santa Fe styled parapets accent the lines of the home. principal exterior componets of glass, natural stone, deeply shaded stucco and tile roofing.
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  #66  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2007, 12:23 PM
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Thumbs up Cedar City Receives A Top Ranking From Where To Retire Magazine





For the second time in a year, Where To Retire Magazine has recognized Cedar City as being one of their best picks for retirees. In their recent February “Best Choices” issue, the Magazine recognizes Cedar City as one of their “Five Best Budget Towns To Retire.”

The magazine, which is geared towards helping people with their retirement decisions, profiled five towns that give residents the most bang for their retirement buck. The towns were selected based upon the myriad of perks and amenities offered at a lower cost than many communities. Where To Retire editors chose the following top five locations as the picks for best budget towns, including Crossville, TN; Columbia, SC; Mount Dora, FL; Sussex County, DE; and Cedar City, Utah.

According to the Where To Retire editor, Mary Lu Abbott, these budget locations offer retirees outdoor recreation, scenic beauty, cultural events and a well rounded lifestyle with costs of living below the national average. According to Abbott, Cedar City was selected because “it’s a haven for lovers of the arts and outdoors with access to an array of national parks as well as the Utah Shakespearean Festival at Southern Utah University.”

“We received the call a few months ago that we were in the running for the Best Choices Issue,” said Maria Twitchell, director of the Cedar City-Brian Head Tourism Bureau & Visitor Center, “I think it’s great to be recognized again by this well known publication.”

Where To Retire magazine was created as a means in helping readers find the ideal place to retire. Now published six times a year, the magazine covers the best retirement regions, towns and master planned communities across the globe and has a national circulation of 220,000. Cedar City was spotlighted in a 10 page feature in their 2006 January/February edition and was selected as one the magazine’s “Top 8 Ski Towns” back in 2004.
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  #67  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2007, 2:55 PM
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NEW REGIONAL
AIRPORT




This replacement airport will provide safer, more convenient air travel and will allow for economic growth and prosperity. Its estimated completion is 2011. Jerry Atkin, Chairman and CEO of SkyWest Airlines which has its headquarters in St. George, says that “A jet capable airport allows us to serve destinations further away than we are capable of today.” This new airport which will accommodate larger planes will bring a general upgrading to the community and to the types of jobs that are available. “A new airport is absolutely a key ingredient in being able to advance the area’s economy in a positive manner,” states Scott Hirschi, Director, Washington County Economic Development Council.

St. George's new airport will include a new 9,300-foot runway large enough to allow scheduled commercial jet airlines and business jets to fly into St. George for the first time. The airport will be a state-of-the-art facility, which will handle twice as many passengers as the existing airport. The new runway will have the latest in lighting systems and navigation technology
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  #68  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2007, 4:10 PM
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Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
NEW REGIONAL
AIRPORT



That Airport looks cool in that rendering.
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  #69  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2007, 7:39 PM
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that is a sexy airport... will it have Jetways?
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  #70  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2007, 7:50 PM
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Beautiful New St. George Library Built With Authentic Charm and Style of the Past.


Elder Holland dedicates Washington County library

By Shaun D. Stahle
Deseret Morning News
ST. GEORGE — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, who, as an elementary-age student, was grateful that the library was strategically located across the street from the Thomas Judd general store, returned to his native city of St. George Monday to dedicate a newly constructed Washington County Library.


Shaun D. Stahle, Deseret Morning NewsThe ribbon was cut Monday for the $5 million Washington County Library, which has the same style as neighboring Old Dixie Academy.

Introduced by Douglas Alder, chairman of the Washington County library board, as one who learned to love books, Elder Holland of the LDS Church's Quorum of the Twelve "rhapsodized" about childhood memories.
He spoke of "brainy" classmates who scurried to the library following school to complete their homework before returning home, noting how some used the library for serious study.
"We put our money in banks, our food in pantries, and God and great people put their wisdom in books," he said.
Elder Holland recounted that efforts to create the first library in St. George began three years after the first settlers arrived in this harsh desert. Without any assurance that they would survive and without sufficient necessities to live, he said, they began saving produce and goods in 60-gallon barrels. When six barrels were filled, they were transported to Salt Lake City, where proceeds from the sale of the produce were applied to the purchase of reading material.
Over the years, five libraries have been constructed in St. George. The most recent, located between the St. George Tabernacle and the Old Dixie Academy on the same block, was demolished to open the grounds for a new city park to be developed between the three buildings.
The $5 million structure is designed in the same architectural style as the Old Dixie Academy constructed in the latter 1880s with its arch entries and sandstone bricks. The library becomes an anchor in this area being designed as a town square.
Dedicatory services were held in the St. George Tabernacle. An overflow audience filled the benches on the main floor and the chairs in the balcony, with others lining the walls. Keeping with tradition that began in the 1870s when Brigham Young was greeted outside of town by a brass band and accompanied into the city, a 10-piece brass band performed for the hour-long service, then led a parade of people, including Elder Holland and his wife, Patricia, from the tabernacle to the library located about 100 yards around the corner.
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  #71  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2007, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by jedikermit View Post
I wonder if St George will ever do anything to try and create more density in town, or if they'll just keep sprawling all over the place. I'm down there about four times per year, and there's not a whole lot going on for the Fastest Growing Metro Area in the country. A lot of sprawl, yes. But not a whole lot happening in what should be their "downtown" area.


The New St. George Town Square Celebrates Community—Past, Present and Future
By Becky Jackson



“When I was a boy growing up here, everything started downtown. Farmers changed irrigation water turns to the chime of the Tabernacle clock. There was a red light on top of the Tabernacle that would flash in an emergency. Citizens seeing this would call the operator to find out what the emergency was and act accordingly. The Christmas season and every major holiday started downtown and spread out from there. Downtown was where families gathered for community picnics, concerts and 4th of July celebrations. It was where they enjoyed the company of their friends and neighbors and engaged in social and recreational activities. Everybody apparently felt a part of it. I’d love to recapture that.”

Mayor Dan McArthur

In 2004, Mayor McArthur, along with city manager Gary Esplin, and members of the St. George City Council began the process of rethinking St. George’s historic downtown. What if we could create a central meeting place—a place to gather and celebrate and a place that would mirror the heartbeat of the people of St. George—past, present and future? They agreed that (1) they wanted to create an opportunity for citizens to rub shoulders and to connect and (2) that it would start downtown and disseminate out into neighborhoods. In planning the Town Square, efforts have been made to incorporate the rich heritage. “You can attach yourself to a community,” said McArthur, “when you know its history.”

In 1861, the three hundred families sent by Brigham Young to colonize and establish a Cotton Mission in Dixie found an arid and desolate landscape. Only their ability to obtain and harness water allowed them to survive, which was not an easy task. Bridges and ditches were frequently destroyed, fields were continually flooded and crops and acres of farmland were washed downstream whenever the Virgin River raged.

Since water was, and still is, an important part of this community, water features became integral to the St. George Town Square and to other downtown enhancements such as the Historic Water Walk. Brooks Pond and underground springs are slated to feed the Water Walk which will travel south down Main Street, past the Opera House, the St. George City offices, Zions Bank Plaza and the recently constructed Main Street Plaza building. An irrigation ditch will be simulated at many points along the pathway. Waterfalls, ponds and other water features will tie in many of the historic and important business centers along its route.

The Design

The ideal place for the St. George Town Square was determined to be the block between 100 South and Tabernacle Street with east-west coordinates between Main Street and 200 West. Historic buildings on three sides—the Woodward School, the Tabernacle and Community Arts Center—would serve as anchors. The new Washington County Library, to be completed by January 2007, will be the fourth anchor. All buildings feature the same color scheme and, in some cases, the same sandstone rock masonry.

Woodward School, built in 1901, was named in honor of George Woodward who devoted his time and means to make the dream of better educational facilities a reality in St. George. Committed to education, the early settlers formed the first school within days of their arrival with nothing more than a tent, a few books and writing slates.

Less than a year after St. George was settled, residents were directed by Brigham Young to build a building as soon as possible which would be commodious, substantial, and well furnished with a seating capacity of 2,000. This building should be an ornament to the city and a credit to its people’s energy and enterprise. During the thirteen long years of construction on the Tabernacle, most of the workers had not yet built suitable homes for themselves. They received food as their only compensation.

Realizing the need for a place of higher education, the citizens of St. George petitioned the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints for funds to help them realize this dream. The Church contributed $20,000 and the people of the St. George Stake provided the remaining $35,000 in funds, materials and labor. The St. George Stake Academy, later called the Dixie Academy, is the precursor to Dixie College and currently serves as the Community Arts Center.

A Town Square to Enjoy

James Dotson, the city’s consultant and project manager on the St. George Town Square and the landscape architect firm of Gillies Stransky Brems Smith in Salt Lake City have taken special care to design a visually appealing, historically accurate and soil compatible park-like atmosphere. Game tables featuring chess and checker boards will be available as well as furniture that can be grouped and rearranged for patrons to relax in and enjoy.

The many trees, both existing and those to be planted, will add to the ambiance and shade. The designers of this project have planned for a patch of cotton and fruit trees on the square indicative of crops planted by early settlers. Historic street lights will illuminate and enhance the square.

The current Washington County Library will be removed once the new library is in operation. Built in the 1980’s, the community has outgrown the facility which also does not fit with the architectural design of the other buildings in the square. This location will be used for a splash pad, a recreational water feature composed of several holes that shoot water to varying heights (similar to the one at the Gateway Plaza in Salt Lake City). Another water feature planned for the square is designed to symbolize the confluence of the Virgin and Santa Clara Rivers.

The current Washington County Library branch on Main Street sits on what used to be St. George’s parade grounds—a field where marches and public gatherings were held. The new square is designed to bring back that tradition with new parade grounds designated for the space north of the new library.

Adjacent to the new parade grounds will be festival grounds planned to host St. George’s traditional activities such as the annual St. George Arts Festival, First Night (New Years Eve Celebration), and will also feature concerts in the park. Another event the mayor would like to initiate is the showing of old movies that were filmed in southern Utah.

Bordering the parade grounds and facing west will be a concrete stair-step style amphitheatre. This will accommodate concerts or performances to take place either in the amphitheatre with the audience sitting on the parade grounds, or visa versa.

The old Woodward Gymnasium, currently residing next to the Historic Woodward School building and home to the St. George Musical Theatre is slated to be torn down. It does not architecturally fit in with the surrounding buildings, and also needs a significant amount of work to meet current earthquake standards. The St. George Musical Theatre is relocating to another location in the area but not on the square.

Community Economics Squared

One of the objectives of the St. George Town Square is to complement downtown businesses by drawing in greater numbers of people. “A town that doesn’t have a vibrant, growing downtown is one that’s dying on the vine,” said McArthur. “A vibrant downtown is the key to a successful city. We’re coming full circle back to a great downtown.”

Businesses such as Blue Bunny Ice Cream and Main Street Travel specifically chose their locations based on the plans for the St. George Town Square. , “Ice cream is an impulse item,” said Karin Tomcik, Public Relations and Assistant Manager for the St. George Blue Bunny Ice Cream Parlor. “We are dependent upon foot traffic.” Obviously, they hope the flow of people coming to and from events held at the St. George Town Square will have a positive impact upon their business.

Downtown business owners generally concurred with Main Street Travel’s Darlene Bolander. “We are hoping that when it’s all done, it will be well worth it,” she said, “that traffic to our business will increase and make up for the deficiencies we’ve experienced as part of the construction.” Businesses in this area have been affected by construction during for three years now. First they had to overcome the construction of the round-about at Main and Tabernacle, then the construction of the Main Street Plaza building and then the reconstruction of St. George Boulevard.

“Not many communities have the opportunity to reinvest in their downtowns,” said McArthur. “The St. George Town Square could not have been possible without everyone working together.” Collaborative efforts of the city, county, state, school district, private business owners and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints have been a key factor in making this dream into a reality.

The St. George Town Square is funded from Redevelopment Agency money. For a period of seven years the city, county and school district were willing to forgo a portion of the property tax revenues derived from businesses in the immediate area and to reinvest it downtown. The budget for both the water walk and the square is roughly $4 million. Despite increases to construction costs since the initial budget was composed in 2004, the city is sticking closely to the proposed figure, cutting back to accommodate when the need arises.

Images of children splashing in the water, a young adult engrossed in a book under the shade of a tree, families happily attending community events together—both in the past and the future—are the pictures that became a vision of the St. George Town Square.

Related:

The Historic WaterWalk on Main Street has begun. This WaterWalk will include a pond up above town, a nature park at the top of Main Street, stylized ditch down Historic Main Street which will branch off into a series of fountains. It will terminate at newly designed Town Square. This Town Square will include the WaterWalk, feature gardens and interactive water features. Along the walk will be placed bronze figures highlighting the achievements of residents throughout the history of St. George.
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  #72  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2007, 11:49 AM
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St.George New Dixie Convention Center.










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  #73  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2007, 1:55 PM
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Hidden Valley:Huge New Ivory Development Has Record Setting March



This new development will add 1,072 residences to St. George within the beautiful Hidden Valley community, bringing with it parks, trails, open space and Club Ivory, complete with tennis courts, volleyball courts, a tot lot and a large pool.
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  #74  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2007, 10:07 AM
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Post Tallest Building Limit: Has Something Changed?

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Originally Posted by jedikermit View Post
Yeah, they have. And there have been infrastructure improvements, trying to keep pace with the numbers; I guess I'm thinking more in terms of centralization. Building the core of the city. Skyscrapers, commercial space IN St. George, not spread out from St G to Ivins, Hurricane, etc...right now it feels like a succession of strip malls and parking lots covering up some absolutely gorgeous scenery.
Unless there have been changes in the building codes in St. George, it use to be to be that NO building could be built that was taller than the Angel Moroni on the Temple. That is why most buildings use to not be taller than 3 stories.

I don't know if the same is true for Ivins, Hurricane and other surrounding communities.

If that St. George law has changed, would someone please update me? Othewise, prepare for more strip malls.
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  #75  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2007, 12:50 PM
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Dixie regional medical center



It does look like the new medical center is around four to five stories. But it's off toward the east of the historic downtown area. I don't think that heights are going to change west of I-15. As St. George continues to boom I imagine they will start to build taller buildings somewhere in the metro other than the historic area. Right now there is a strong push to revitalize and bring back the historic area. Even the new library at Town Square was built as a replica of an old 19th century building.

new library
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  #76  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2007, 6:57 PM
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Originally Posted by N2I.F. View Post
Unless there have been changes in the building codes in St. George, it use to be to be that NO building could be built that was taller than the Angel Moroni on the Temple. That is why most buildings use to not be taller than 3 stories.

I don't know if the same is true for Ivins, Hurricane and other surrounding communities.

If that St. George law has changed, would someone please update me? Othewise, prepare for more strip malls.
this is eerily reminiscent of way back during the Ottoman empire, no structure in the lands conquered by the Ottomans could be taller than a turkish soldier on a horse. It was a way for the conquered peoples to show thier subserviance to thier occupiers.

Couldn't be any sort of parallel here, could there?
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  #77  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2007, 10:52 PM
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I was stopping by this thread to read about the St. George area. Figured I'd answer the question as to the city's height restrictions.

I looked on the city of St. George website for the city building code. According to the city code, buildings in agricultural and residential zones (including single- and multi-family housing) are limited to 2 1/2 stories or 35', whichever is greater. Buildings in mixed-use developments are limited to 45', but may be built taller if approved by the planning commission and the city council. There was NO specific restriction that buildings be limited to be lower than the temple building...

Hopefully your city will eventually come around an amend its building codes to allow for taller buildings
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  #78  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2007, 12:37 PM
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Thanks for your clarifications Jim. I hope you will check in with the St.George thread periodically. I imagine that St.George will develop an area for taller buildings in the near future. At the rate its growing it won't be long before it is the most populas city proper in Utah. I do think though that the area around the LDS temple will remain more historic in nature. I think all residents of St.George, including many now who are not LDS are pretty opinionated about having a certain historic feel to that area.
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  #79  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2007, 2:45 PM
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I would think that the whole "no building can be taller than the temple" thing is just a myth... Probably like the "no building in SLC can be taller than the COB" myth...
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  #80  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2007, 3:43 PM
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I'm sure your right, My statement was made tounge-in-cheek. But there is no tounge-in-cheek smile face so I improvised with this guy
You know how to end these myths once and for all, is for someone, anyone to build TALLER!!! please somebody do it (of course in an appropriate manner and an appropriate location).
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