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  #201  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2007, 1:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Avian001 View Post
Word is out that the new design for a major tower in Minneapolis will finally be unveiled in Mid-April (undoubtedly higher than 300 feet and sources are hinting at something much taller). It was expected over a month ago but the project went back to the architects for a re-design.
thanks for the update. i can't wait to hear more. this has got to be the most anticipated project in the whole midwest right now.
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  #202  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2007, 3:50 AM
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^Really? I'm actually a little surprised (and pleasantly heartened) by that statement.

I dunno. I look at SSC and notice few seem to be interested in Minneapolis developments. It's a little better here at SSP, sometimes. I'd like to think that those of us in the Midwest are all here together, unified, rather than fight as petty rivals. That is what you seem to be implying. And that's great, really!, although I am a little jaded these days.

Maybe it's because I get the impression that unfriendly rivalries often win out over a pride in Midwestern regionalism. I'd be happy to see Milwaukee, Cleveland, St. Louis, Detroit, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, or any other Midwestern city have a potential project like this one. I'd be more than a little jealous, of course! But I'd be mighty proud that the Midwest demonstrates that it is on the rebound! Hell, I still hope that St. Louis does build that 70+ story tower that made the rounds a few months ago!

Shallow as it may seem, I think it would spur a wonderful inter-city friendly rivalry that would help everyone in the midwest - people who have frequently experienced a bunker mentality in the recent past - realize that these fabulous cities still have something to say about life in the 21st Century.

The Midwest is not a sad relic of Late-19th-Early 20th century industrialism. These cities are an important voice for US urbanity in this century.

I realize, SteelyDan, that you are most likely not jaded, and I'm sorry that I launched a riff on your post. I just had a few nutty, idealistic thoughts that I felt needed to be put out there. I'll shut up now...
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Last edited by Avian001; Mar 24, 2007 at 4:48 AM.
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  #203  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2007, 4:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Avian001 View Post
I realize, SteelyDan, that you are most likely not jaded, and I'm sorry that I launched a riff on your post. I just had a few nutty, idealistic thoughts that I felt needed to be put out there. I'll shut up now...
i hear ya. i would love to see all of the midwest's cities get new exciting skyscraper proposals for a new tallest builing. chicgao has one, st. louis has one, cincy has one, milwaukee potentially has one, hopefully minneapolis will get one soon as well. being from the skyscraper mecca that is chicago probably does make me look at things a bit differently, but tall buildings are simply cool, no matter where they're built.
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  #204  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2007, 10:56 PM
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I dunno. I look at SSC and notice few seem to be interested in Minneapolis developments.
The biggest issue with that is Minneapolis/St Paul at one point had I believe three individual development sites dedicated to it. Now of course only one is left but it draws the majority of the Minneapolis crowd. There are around 300 members on minnescraper which is the site that is dedicated completely to the minneapolis area...so there is most definately an interest, just not so much on SSC or on here. If all those members were on SSC for example, I bet there would be an uprising if they couldn't have their own section to post sort of the way Chicago does since there have been near 22,000 posts in a one year period on Minnescraper......between 300 people (realistically fewer because a lot of people register and only post a small amount). Plus, new members there all the time say they read the forums constantly but don't register. I used to do that then finally registered.
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  #205  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2007, 1:01 AM
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Another one for STL. It'll be Downtown. And the date is wrong. It's suppose to say 2007, fall, not 2006.

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  #206  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2007, 12:12 AM
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A construction update to the ultra-luxe IVY Hotel + Residences in downtown Minneapolis...

Photos by MidwestProduct at Minnescraper.com:










Anyone up for a party in my 72-foot-long Great Room? My treat, if you all contribute at least $100,000 apiece...

http://www.ivympls.com/FloorplanPDF/Delano.pdf







This shot is by Timmyd at Minnescraper.com:

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  #207  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2007, 6:23 PM
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I like the building in the foreground better
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  #208  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2007, 6:35 PM
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wow that project sure come along way since i was in downtown mini in early feb

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  #209  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 9:19 PM
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a potential new tallest for evanston, IL:




http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed

523-foot tower in Evanston?
Proposed 49-story condo building would nearly double the height of the town's current tallest

By Blair Kamin and Deborah Horan

Tribune staff reporters
Published April 26, 2007, 3:30 PM CDT

Forget the twisting, 2,000-foot-tall Chicago Spire that could rise along the city's lakefront.

Developers went public Thursday with their plan for another race to the sky, this one in downtown Evanston: A proposed condominium tower that would crack the 500-foot barrier and become the tallest building in Chicago's suburbs.

Sure to incite heated debate in a suburb already in the throes of a high-rise building boom, the plan calls for tearing down a two-story retail building on a triangular block bounded by Church Street, Orrington and Sherman Avenues, and replacing it with a sliver-thin, 49-story condominium tower sheathed in glass and metal.

At 523 feet, the height pegged in a filing to Evanston officials from developers James Klutznick and Tim Anderson, the skyscraper would soar nearly twice as high as two neighboring towers that now form the peaks of the Evanston skyline.

"It's the suburban Spire," quipped the project's architect, Laurence Booth of the Chicago firm Booth Hansen, referring to the plan by Dublin-based developer Garrett Kelleher to erect a 150-story tower designed by Zurich-based architect Santiago Calatrava on Chicago's lakefront.

Filed more than a week ago and shopped in closed sessions to city officials, the Evanston proposal underscores how developers around the country are shattering the once-distinct line between cities and suburbs. The trend is especially strong in landlocked suburbs that have nowhere to grow but up if they want to increase their tax base and hold down residential property tax bills.

Yet the shift has sparked passionate debates over traffic congestion, the displacement of local retailers by national chains and the loss of what opponents call their shady-street lifestyle. As city leaders reacted to the skyscraper plan, that tension was palpable.

"I don't know where we can go in Evanston but up because we don't have any land," said Ald. Delores Holmes (5th). "But it is pretty tall."

If built, the Evanston skyscraper would easily top the 418-foot-tall Oakbrook Terrace Tower, currently the title-holder in Chicago's suburbs, and could also lay claim to being the tallest building between Chicago and Milwaukee. That esoteric distinction is now held by Evanston's tallest building, the 277-foot-tall Chase Building, a modernist high-rise finished in 1969.

Klutznick, a partner at Klutznick Fisher Development Co., and Anderson, president of Focus Development Inc., are now completing the nearby Sherman Plaza condo tower, which is just a foot shorter at 276 feet.

But the block in question has a height limit of 125 feet, so the developers, who say they have a contract to purchase the two-story retail building, will need a zoning change.

As in other large-scale residential real estate developments, they also will need to generate enough pre-sales of condominiums to get bank financing. Most daunting of all, they will have to persuade Evanstonians to reshape their skyline--and, with it, the town's identity.

Evanston officials previously forced developer and architect David Hovey to downsize a proposed 36-story tower at the north end of downtown and instead build a block-long, 16-story building that some have likened to an enormous wall.

Anticipating just such a debate, Klutznick said in an interview: "This is absolutely the center of town. People recognize that if there's going to be height, this is where to do it."

He added: "This is an icon that says this is the downtown of the north lakefront," said, referring to how downtown Evanston already draws people from nearby suburbs such as Wilmette and from the far north side of Chicago.

Michael Lembeck, the owner of a shoestore in the targeted two-story building along Church Streets, sees the proposal in far less positive light.

Saying that his business, "Williams Shoes--the Walking Spirit" had been at 708 Church St. for 54 years, he lamented that he had bought the space next door last year and turned it into a woman's boutique at a cost of $120,000.

"Now 10 months later, they're talking about tearing the whole building down," he said Thursday. "That would be kind of a waste to be shut down before we recoup our investment."

He also expressed concern that downtown Evanston already has too many vacant storefronts and that it won't be able to absorb the commercial space envisioned in the project.

The proposed skyscraper would have a roughly triangular, or flatiron, shape formed by the surrounding streets.

It would rise on a five-story podium that would contain two levels of shops and, above them, a three-level parking garage with 230 spaces. The glassy condominium tower, set back from the street, would contain anywhere from seven to two units on each of its floors. Prices would be $350 to $400 per square foot, the developers said.

The plan also envisions tearing down a 1940s mid-rise office building at the block's south end and replacing it with a low-rise restaurant building whose footprint would be half as large. The developers still have to purchase that property.

A classically decorated landmark building in the middle of the block, the three-story Hahn Building, would be left untouched.

The developers say that the added real estate taxes created by the project would allow the city to renovate the decrepit Fountain Square Plaza at the block's south end. The plaza's war memorial, which now consists of three brick pylons recognizing Evanston soldiers, would be shifted to another plaza just south of Davis Street.

The developers want to begin construction next year and complete their project by late 2010.

City zoning officials are now reviewing the plan, which is expected to take at least two weeks. The next steps would be a hearing by the Evanston Plan Commission and a vote by its City Council. The developers said they anticipate public meetings on the tower in June.

Asked if she thought Evanston residents would fight the tower, Ald. Cheryl Wollin (1st), in whose ward the project would be built said: "Nothing in Evanston is non-controversial. I expect it to be thoroughly debated."

Wollin declined to say whether the tower is too tall, saying: "I can't make that judgment now. If there's any place for height in the city, that's the block where it would be most compatible. Is it too tall? That will have to be determined by lots of discussion."

If built in downtown Chicago, the tower would fade into the woodwork. It would be the same height as a classic 1920s skyscraper along Wacker Drive--the eclectic, dome-topped 35 E. Wacker Drive (the former Jewelers Building).

Asked if Evanston planners would follow a national trend in urban planning which gives preference to tall and thin towers on the grounds that they create the density that makes cities hum while letting natural light reach streets below, Klutznick replied: "I would never say that Evanston is influenced by anybody other than Evanston."

While the Evanston tower would be the tallest in Chicago's suburbs, it would not be the tallest suburban building in the United States. That distinction is accorded to an office building in Sandy Springs, Ga., an Atlanta suburb. Completed in 1988 and part of the Concourse towers complex, it rises 570 feet, according to Emporis, the Darmstadt, Germany-based Web site that compiles data on buildings throughout the world.

And there are other tall buildings outside traditional downtowns. Outside Manhattan, for example, Jersey City, N.J., sports the 781-foot-tall Goldman Sachs Tower. In addition, Houston's Galleria district, several miles west of that city's downtown, boasts the 901-foot Williams Tower, which is often called the tallest building in America outside a central business district.


Last edited by Steely Dan; May 25, 2007 at 12:42 AM.
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  #210  
Old Posted May 2, 2007, 6:25 AM
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Has any new information surfaced with regards to the MW tower in St. Louis? I had read in another forum that Mcgowan Walsh was supposedly going to reveal an extremely substantial project for the St. Louis area sometime this spring.
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  #211  
Old Posted May 2, 2007, 8:29 AM
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Greektown Casino Hotel (& Parking Garage) - April 29, 2007



The hotel seems to be rising so slow.
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  #212  
Old Posted May 4, 2007, 3:22 AM
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The hotel seems to be rising so slow.
That's because Vinnie is running out of spots to hide the bodies in the concrete...



J/K
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  #213  
Old Posted May 4, 2007, 3:27 AM
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Vinnie could always hide them in the massive, concrete garage behind the hotel. lol
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  #214  
Old Posted May 4, 2007, 6:36 PM
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The hotel appears to be working on level 3, from what I can tell. This is the level that will have the skywalk devouring the sightlines of Monroe and St. Antoine Streets over to the old schoolhouse.
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  #215  
Old Posted May 7, 2007, 2:30 AM
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Skywalks....

Now we are better than Troy!
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  #216  
Old Posted May 8, 2007, 2:22 AM
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Nope. Troy has wider roads and more surface parking lots!
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  #217  
Old Posted May 15, 2007, 9:04 PM
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Posted this in the stl city thread, but I think it might be relevant here as well. Hopefully this really does get the "within the year" construction start they are advertising. If so, Stl is going to be seeing a lot of crane action in the coming years with Ballpark Village, Skyhouse, Roberts Mayfair, and Bottle district.

Fizz may be back in Bottle District
By Riddhi Trivedi-St. Clair
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
05/15/2007

Plans for the beleaguered $290 million Bottle District development north of downtown may be back on track with Clayco Inc. playing a prominent, but as yet undefined, role.

Officials from Clayco and the development arm of McGuire Moving & Storage, which has long sought to develop the site, said Monday that they are looking at a very "aggressive" development schedule, with work possibly beginning within a year.

A new group of local companies — in addition to Clayco and McGuire — is being formed to take on various development-related roles, said Matt Bernsen, spokesman for BDP LLC, the development group for the project. But he would not discuss details on the companies involved or what role each would play.

Plans for the development have changed since it was first announced in September 2004 by Dan McGuire, president of McGuire Moving. Advertisement

The last initiative, announced in September 2005, called for three high-rise condo buildings on the approximately 16-acre site — the tallest of which would be 630 feet. The city pledged a $51.3 million tax break. .

At the time, Ghazi Co., based in Charlotte, N.C., was named co-developer and Clayco was the general contractor.

Since then the project has stalled, and Ghazi dropped out about eight months ago, giving rise to speculation that the Bottle District may be dead.

"Speculation is speculation," Bernsen said. "Everyone has a right to their opinion about what's going on.

"(Afshin Ghazi) is doing a major project called the EpiCentre in Charlotte, and his timelines for that were established before he got involved with Bottle District. We required a more hands-on joint venture partner."

McGuire has been trying to form a new structure for the development team. Clayco worked to get the project back on track after it heard that Ghazi's contract had been terminated, said Larry Chapman, a partner in the company.

"We got re-engaged heavily in the last 30 to 60 days," Chapman said.

While Chapman didn't provide details, he said the Bottle District team would "look at all the great ideas accumulated over the last couple of years and pick and choose the best ones. … What we need is to look at what meets the needs of downtown right now."

The final project will be valued at or higher than the original $290 million estimate, Bernsen said.

The Bottle District is likely to remain a mixed-use project with residential, retail, office and even hotel and entertainment uses, Chapman said, adding that construction would have to start soon.

"It would have to be very quick. Clearly the renaissance in downtown is happening now, not five years from now," he said. "We would want to put something on the ground now. We want to make it fit with the things going on in the city so they don't cannibalize each other."

Bernsen and Chapman cited the ongoing Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. casino development and Ballpark Village as complementary downtown to the Bottle District.

The development team, along with several tenants, will be announced within the next month or two, he said.

"Right now it is more about making the district a viable project as opposed to just putting it up," Bernsen said.
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  #218  
Old Posted May 20, 2007, 8:42 AM
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More news - Bottle District finally coming online?!?!

Clayco withdraws contractor application for Ball Park Village
By Riddhi Trivedi-St. Clair and Jake Wagman
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
05/19/2007

Clayco has pulled its application to be general contractor on the Ballpark Village project, days after the Post-Dispatch reported that the company had taken an expanded role in another high-profile downtown development, the Bottle District.

"We just have our hands full. We had to pick one or the other," said Bob Clark, president and chief executive of the Clayton-based firm. "We have the chance to have an equity position in Bottle District and be a part of the development team."

Baltimore-based Cordish Cos. is the Ballpark Village developer.

Clark said the Ballpark Village and Bottle District projects would compete with each other for tenants. Advertisement

The Post-Dispatch reported Tuesday that Clayco assumed a more-prominent role in the Bottle District in recent weeks after the departure of a co-

developer, Charlotte, N.C.-based Ghazi Co. The lead developer is Dan McGuire, president of McGuire Moving & Storage Co. of St. Louis.

Clayco, which was the project manager on the construction of the new Busch Stadium, also is involved in a partnership to develop NorthPark, a 550-acre mixed-use office and industrial project under way near Lambert Field.

"We felt compelled to be very clear with Cordish that we didn't see ourselves as contenders for the (Ballpark Village) job anymore," Clark said.

Chase Martin, Cordish's director of development for Ballpark Village, said his company is interviewing several contractors for the project. He said Cordish is looking at hiring one firm to be general contractor or several companies that could share the responsibility.

He played down the significance of Clayco dropping out.

"When you have a project of this size and scale, it's typical to have contractors coming late in the process, or dropping out early," Martin said.

Martin also said Ballpark Village is on track to open on time.

"We have hit our goals and are moving forward accordingly," he said.

Cordish is seeking to build six blocks of signature restaurants, specialty stores, entertainment venues and offices on the crater of land that was the site of old Busch Stadium. Cordish, which has built similar projects around the country, is a partner with the Cardinals organization, which owns the land.

Though the team has yet to break ground — or even announce a date for groundbreaking — the Cardinals are hoping to have the project open by midsummer 2009, when Busch will play host to the

Major League All-Star Game.

In February, the city's Board of Aldermen backed providing up to $115 million in tax subsidies to the project. The state Department of Economic Development, which also must approve parts of the incentive package, is reviewing the proposal.

After the department reviews the incentives, the deal will go to the Missouri Development Finance Board for final approval. A spokesman for the Economic Development Department said this week that staff there are still looking at the project. He did not know when it would be submitted to the finance board, which is chaired by Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder.

Plans for the $290 million Bottle District call for a 16-acre mixed-use project that could include a high-rise condominium tower as well as retail and office space.
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  #219  
Old Posted May 24, 2007, 2:09 AM
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The Moderne - Milwaukee (I don't the exact height, but it's 30 stories, so it should be right around 300 ft)
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  #220  
Old Posted May 25, 2007, 12:36 AM
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^ thanks for the reminder on that one, hydro. it's now added to page 1.


in evanston news, a second tower is now being proposed for the fountain square block. it's proposed to stand 36 floors. i did some rough calcs off of a base elevation drawing and came to a rough figure of 382'. it's proposed to go on the southern half of the same block that the 529' proposal is also slated for. who knows if either or both will get built, but things are getting a little silly in little old evanston.








below is a photoshop i made of the new proposal super-imposed onto the rendering of the first fountain square tower proposal


Last edited by Steely Dan; May 25, 2007 at 3:09 PM.
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