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View Poll Results: Should Tucson be like ...
Tucson today - ugly 3 10.71%
Hong Kong, China - skyscrapered 1 3.57%
San Francisco, California - beautiful 4 14.29%
Portland, Oregon - eclectic, hip 12 42.86%
Phoenix, Arizona - sprawled, anti-urban 3 10.71%
None of the above - please explain? 5 17.86%
Voters: 28. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 2:29 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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Lightbulb Tucson Concept

Description : Creative ideas needed to transform Tucson into a First Rate World Class city in the 21st (or even 22nd) Century.

You will receive the NIMBY stamp, , should anyone perceive you as a NIMBY, Not In My BackYard .

We need concepts and free willing unobstructed creative ideas NOT the realities of market, cost, politics and/or community input.
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  #2  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 3:58 PM
SunDevil SunDevil is offline
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None of the above.

Tucson needs to leverage the University, even more, and focus on the dull things like efficient transportation and making itself the best school district in the state. This will attract talent and investment.

There is already too much financial infrastructure in Phoenix for Tucson to overcome, but, I see no reason why it can't be more similar to Austin in relation to Houston and Dallas. Make the town attractive to investment, make it clean, easy to navigate, safe, and well educated. Once the groundwork is set, the build environment will follow.
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  #3  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 6:33 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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I like to add my vision (initial at least)
*Tucson is a biking town (ranked in the top 5 by several magazines). I'd like to see bike bridges along broadway rd, oracle rd, kino-campbell and 6th ave/Valencia/Houghton Rd. These bike bridges are elevated bike paths so as to avoid vehicular traffic.
*Urban districts where 5+ floor high buildings will be standard. Each building will need at least a grocer and a restaurant. The buildings need to be tightly packed much like Paris
*Inter-city rail extended to the Tucson mountains
*High Speed rail connecting to San Diego, L.A. and Las Vegas.
*Stricter building codes with thicker sound proof walls, rain water reclamation systems and certified green (solar in every house)
*More outdoor man-made landmarks such as Tucson's own Eiffel Tower
*Require modern unique skyscrapers within downtown proper
*Spacious walkways/plazas by the Santa Cruz River
*Fill the Santa Cruz River with water
*2 crosstown freeways with art along the freeway

more to come ...

Please note to disregard the costs, politics etc... It's a concept.
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  #4  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 7:16 PM
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phxSUNSfan phxSUNSfan is offline
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I would say that everything considered, Tucson is more anti-urban and sprawled than Phoenix. No real mass transit, the City of Tucson is STILL annexing more land, or considering it while Phoenix and Scottsdale are preserving tons of open land within city limits as parkland/preserves.

Tucson is also not densely populated at all and has a very small downtown footprint with a very limited residential base. I think Tucson is more likely to eventually emulate Tempe one day. They are starting to get some housing around the university/downtown that mimics what has been going on in Tempe for years. Tucson has it's own identity though. I think a few cities in Arizona have come along with building unique communities. The organic communities in Flagstaff, Tempe, Phoenix, and Tucson are maturing...if not underdeveloped. With the exception of Flagstaff, which is a very small city and has a pretty filled out historic downtown, the other cities still have tons of planning and catching up to do.

Last edited by phxSUNSfan; Aug 8, 2013 at 5:59 PM.
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  #5  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 8:00 PM
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Anqrew Anqrew is offline
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This is the funniest thing i have ever seen. Tucson is not ugly. Tucson is one of the most beautiful cities in the country, scenic desert and mountains surrounding the entire area.

We don't want to be phoenix, nor will we ever be.
We are not a economic hub like San Francisco, nor will we ever be.
We are Tucson and we are a unique city and our development in the past couple years is the most we have ever gotten so lets learn to appreciate it rather than criticize it.

Now, please go complain on some other forum. this forum is for people with positive and mature attitudes.
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  #6  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 8:02 PM
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Anqrew Anqrew is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gozilla View Post
I like to add my vision (initial at least)
*Tucson is a biking town (ranked in the top 5 by several magazines). I'd like to see bike bridges along broadway rd, oracle rd, kino-campbell and 6th ave/Valencia/Houghton Rd. These bike bridges are elevated bike paths so as to avoid vehicular traffic.
*Urban districts where 5+ floor high buildings will be standard. Each building will need at least a grocer and a restaurant. The buildings need to be tightly packed much like Paris
*Inter-city rail extended to the Tucson mountains
*High Speed rail connecting to San Diego, L.A. and Las Vegas.
*Stricter building codes with thicker sound proof walls, rain water reclamation systems and certified green (solar in every house)
*More outdoor man-made landmarks such as Tucson's own Eiffel Tower
*Require modern unique skyscrapers within downtown proper
*Spacious walkways/plazas by the Santa Cruz River
*Fill the Santa Cruz River with water
*2 crosstown freeways with art along the freeway

more to come ...

Please note to disregard the costs, politics etc... It's a concept.
unfortunately politics and costs are the most important part. How are you going to fund these projects? until you can get that source, these concepts will remain just that. CONCEPTS!
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  #7  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 8:13 PM
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Arquitect Arquitect is offline
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I have an issue with the poll. Mostly because it way over simplifies the cities you are using as examples. What is it that makes San Fransisco beautiful? Is it the topography? The climate? The ocean and bay views? The greenery? Or is it something that can actualy be emulated in Tucson? Also, I have been to some areas of San Fransisco that are not beautiful at all, so every city is diverse and complex. You are also not accounting for why those cities were shaped the way they were. Hong Kong is full of skyscrappers because of geographic limitations and political instances (For the longest time it was England's gateway to the East, and therefore became the commercial center of Asia). And, not all of Tucson is ugly. There are some really beautiful areas within the city.

All that being said. Tucson doesn't have to try and become another city, it has to evolve as itself. To scrap everything and ignore the city's past would be a huge mistake. Tucson can't be Paris or San Fransisco, but it can be a denser version of itself, a greener version of itself, and build a greater mass transit system. I'm not trying to dismiss your ideas, but if you want to start a whole new city from tabula raza, then we could create it anywhere, and there is no need for Tucson to be the site. But if the attempt of this conversation is to really shape Tucson, we do have to look at what it was, what it is, and within that framework create a vision.
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  #8  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 11:45 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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I'm glad I got some people's attention. The poll helps. This thread was meant to develop ideas on what you'd want in Tucson regardless of politics, cost etc... Unfortunately, some people got hurt and took it seriously.

Of course Tucson has nice God given environment. It's the man made stuff that's ugly. Maybe, I should've taken off the name of the cities.

Last edited by gozilla; Oct 14, 2012 at 11:57 PM.
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  #9  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 11:47 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anqrew View Post
This is the funniest thing i have ever seen. Tucson is not ugly. Tucson is one of the most beautiful cities in the country, scenic desert and mountains surrounding the entire area.

We don't want to be phoenix, nor will we ever be.
We are not a economic hub like San Francisco, nor will we ever be.
We are Tucson and we are a unique city and our development in the past couple years is the most we have ever gotten so lets learn to appreciate it rather than criticize it.

Now, please go complain on some other forum. this forum is for people with positive and mature attitudes.
No. I am not going to another forum. Who the hell are you? The super moderator? If this forum bothers you, simply stay away from it.
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  #10  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 11:50 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arquitect View Post
I have an issue with the poll. Mostly because it way over simplifies the cities you are using as examples. What is it that makes San Fransisco beautiful? Is it the topography? The climate? The ocean and bay views? The greenery? Or is it something that can actualy be emulated in Tucson? Also, I have been to some areas of San Fransisco that are not beautiful at all, so every city is diverse and complex. You are also not accounting for why those cities were shaped the way they were. Hong Kong is full of skyscrappers because of geographic limitations and political instances (For the longest time it was England's gateway to the East, and therefore became the commercial center of Asia). And, not all of Tucson is ugly. There are some really beautiful areas within the city.

All that being said. Tucson doesn't have to try and become another city, it has to evolve as itself. To scrap everything and ignore the city's past would be a huge mistake. Tucson can't be Paris or San Fransisco, but it can be a denser version of itself, a greener version of itself, and build a greater mass transit system. I'm not trying to dismiss your ideas, but if you want to start a whole new city from tabula raza, then we could create it anywhere, and there is no need for Tucson to be the site. But if the attempt of this conversation is to really shape Tucson, we do have to look at what it was, what it is, and within that framework create a vision.
Of course, there are areas in any city that's beautiful and ugly. I'm just generalizing those cities. San Francisco is always ranked among the top cities in the world in general terms (beautiful). It you don't think Tucson is ugly, that's fine. If you are one of the guys that checked 'none of the above', fine...and thanks for your professional input.
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  #11  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 11:53 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phxSUNSfan View Post
I would say that everything considered, Tucson is more anti-urban and sprawled than Phoenix. No real mass transit, the City of Tucson is STILL annexing more land, or considering it while Phoenix and Scottsdale are preserving tons of open land within city limits as parkland/preserves.

Tucson is also not densely populated at all and has a very small downtown footprint with a very limited residential base. I think Tucson is more likely to eventually emulate Tempe one day. They are starting to get some housing around the university/downtown that mimics what has been going on in Tempe for years. Tucson has it's own identity though. I think a few cities in Arizona have come along with building unique communities. The organic communities in Flagstaff, Tempe, Scottsdale (old town), Phoenix, and Tucson are maturing...if not underdeveloped. With the exception of Flagstaff, which is a very small city and has a pretty filled out historic downtown, the other cities still have tons of planning and catching up to do.
Thanks for your professional and honest response.
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  #12  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2012, 11:54 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anqrew View Post
unfortunately politics and costs are the most important part. How are you going to fund these projects? until you can get that source, these concepts will remain just that. CONCEPTS!
Here's one for ya!
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  #13  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2012, 5:41 AM
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Anqrew Anqrew is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gozilla View Post
No. I am not going to another forum. Who the hell are you? The super moderator? If this forum bothers you, simply stay away from it.
yes i am the super moderator... No one likes a Troll. so take it somewhere else. if you are too old to know what "troll" means. its what you are doing. purposely igniting flame wars and feeding arguments.

Your the one who invited me to the forum! if you dont want me to see it dont shove it in my face.
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  #14  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2012, 2:08 PM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anqrew View Post
yes i am the super moderator... No one likes a Troll. so take it somewhere else. if you are too old to know what "troll" means. its what you are doing. purposely igniting flame wars and feeding arguments.

Your the one who invited me to the forum! if you dont want me to see it dont shove it in my face.
I love it! Ha! Ha! Ha!
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  #15  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2013, 2:40 AM
ljbuild ljbuild is offline
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Yes the landscape and the mountains ( of which are unique because of their
DESERT TO FOREST type of landscape) , Makes Tucson beautiful.


However,


THE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM SUCKS !!

Getting across town takes fricken forever, due to its LACK OF FREEWAYS.

Here it is 2013 and 1million people later and still NOT EVEN ONE FREEWAY, nor

a loop freeway, outside the interstates(10 & 19) which serve only just the

west and southeast parts of town. If you live on the east side of town

" YOURE SCREWED"
.
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  #16  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2013, 1:38 AM
gozilla gozilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ljbuild View Post
Yes the landscape and the mountains ( of which are unique because of their
DESERT TO FOREST type of landscape) , Makes Tucson beautiful.


However,


THE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM SUCKS !!

Getting across town takes fricken forever, due to its LACK OF FREEWAYS.

Here it is 2013 and 1million people later and still NOT EVEN ONE FREEWAY, nor

a loop freeway, outside the interstates(10 & 19) which serve only just the

west and southeast parts of town. If you live on the east side of town

" YOURE SCREWED"
.
THE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM SUCKS...AND SO ARE THE NIMBY'S AND CAVES (CITIZENS AGAINST VIRTUALLY EVERYTHING)!!

To date : Grand Canyon University got turned down by Tucson's coward politicians. A cell phone tower got turned down around the Cabrini Neighborhood. The morons at Tucson city hall have no idea when downtown links will be finished. The road construction intersection of Grant Rd. and Oracle Rd. seem to never end...two years?

Anything new? It's business as usual....
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  #17  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2013, 2:31 PM
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admdavid admdavid is offline
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As Arquitect said, Tucson needs to evolve as itself. It shouldn't emulate any other city as it has unique positives (natural beauty, great university, etc.) and negatives (inferiority complex to PHX, etc.). Smart people with foresight need to be elected and supported to insure that Tucson continues to grow in a sustainable and positive way for the community and state. Lack of effective transportation options, especially to the east side as noted, are big deterrents that need to be addressed.
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  #18  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2013, 3:11 PM
soleri soleri is offline
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Fast forward to 2040. Is oil going to be cheap? Is the climate going to be stable? You can't divorce science and resource depletion from the fate of medium-sized city located in a fragile environment. The buzzwords need to be sustainability, contraction, mass transit, greater urban density, and mitigation of carrying costs. Tucson is not going to survive as a sprawled-out city of oblivious motorists. That cornucopian fantasy is dying a little bit every day, and deserves to be. Cross-town freeways will be irrelevant boondoggles once oil hits $200/bbl. Tucson's scenic assets will be increasingly stressed by climate change as the years pass. You need a vision that accounts for global disruption and Tucson's precarious position in that matrix. Or, you can continue to sprawl as if the profits of hucksters are more important than a future where extreme conditions will be the norm. New freeways and anti-urban housing pods will only act as nails in Tucson's coffin. Forget San Francisco and Portland. If Tucson survives at all, it will be radically different than it is today.
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  #19  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2013, 11:49 PM
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Ritarancher Ritarancher is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soleri View Post
Fast forward to 2040. Is oil going to be cheap? Is the climate going to be stable? You can't divorce science and resource depletion from the fate of medium-sized city located in a fragile environment. The buzzwords need to be sustainability, contraction, mass transit, greater urban density, and mitigation of carrying costs. Tucson is not going to survive as a sprawled-out city of oblivious motorists. That cornucopian fantasy is dying a little bit every day, and deserves to be. Cross-town freeways will be irrelevant boondoggles once oil hits $200/bbl. Tucson's scenic assets will be increasingly stressed by climate change as the years pass. You need a vision that accounts for global disruption and Tucson's precarious position in that matrix. Or, you can continue to sprawl as if the profits of hucksters are more important than a future where extreme conditions will be the norm. New freeways and anti-urban housing pods will only act as nails in Tucson's coffin. Forget San Francisco and Portland. If Tucson survives at all, it will be radically different than it is today.
You seemed to not take into consideration the fact that cars will be around but not fueled by oil. We've built too much car dependent stuff to suddenly quit using cars
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  #20  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2013, 5:54 AM
phoenixwillrise phoenixwillrise is offline
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Tucson

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritarancher View Post
You seemed to not take into consideration the fact that cars will be around but not fueled by oil. We've built too much car dependent stuff to suddenly quit using cars
Tucson, needs to address a lot of things but top on the priority list should be freeways. You can pretend you don't need freeways and or parkways but the cars are there and more are on the way. Landscaping your existing freeway and a half should also be of concern as the entry to the city is flat out ugly from all directions. Even if the populace can't stand freeways you at least need parkways where major intersections go over and under even if most can't have left turns. Clean that up and start your ideas from there. Someone mentioned high speed rail from there to Vegas and L.A. What about Phoenix? Have you driven the freeway recently between the two cities? If you are going to design a city with a look to the future you need to be practical as well as visionary.
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