HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West

View Poll Results: Which Mass Transit project should have the MTA's next priority?
Light Rail to Crenshaw Blvd, Norwalk/Santa Fe Springs and Del Amo Mall 7 2.24%
LIght Rail: Downtown Connector 61 19.55%
405 Freeway Corridor from Van Nuys to LAX 42 13.46%
Subway/Heavy Rail to Westwood 152 48.72%
Subway/Heavy Rail via Whitter Blvd 8 2.56%
Subway/Heavy Rail via Vermont Avenue 8 2.56%
Double Track and Electrify Metrolink Lines 19 6.09%
Other 7 2.24%
None 8 2.56%
Voters: 312. You may not vote on this poll

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted May 18, 2005, 7:10 PM
Wright Concept's Avatar
Wright Concept Wright Concept is offline
I just ran out of B***sht
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 2,338
Question What's next?

The MTA approved funding for Expo Line, East LA Gold Line is under construction and now their efforts on getting the Gold Line to Azusa/Montclair

For LA in the upcoming years, after the Gold Line to Azusa/Montclair, which project should be the next project that the MTA should pursue?
__________________
"Statistics are used much like a drunk uses a lamp post: for support, not illumination." -Vin Scully
The Opposite of PRO is CON, that fact is clearly seen.
If Progress means moves forward, then what does Congress mean?

Last edited by Wright Concept; Jan 23, 2006 at 11:49 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted May 18, 2005, 7:31 PM
BrandonJXN's Avatar
BrandonJXN BrandonJXN is offline
Hazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Posts: 4,246
I said this before..but I think the Red Line should be extended to Century City, and either curve south and have it meet at one of the Exop Stations, or build a elevated, driverless busway that connects the two lines.

Don't make the Red Line go to the ocean seeing as how sooner or later the Expo Line will get there.
__________________
Strobe
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted May 18, 2005, 7:32 PM
LongBeachUrbanist's Avatar
LongBeachUrbanist LongBeachUrbanist is offline
Ridin' The Metro
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Metro Blue, Wardlow Stop
Posts: 2,574
The Downtown Connector is the single most important mile-and-a-half rail project that can be built in Southern California. It will close the gap in the light-rail system, and in so doing provide for tons of people a single-seat ride to, from and through Downtown LA.

After that, I pick the Red Line to Westwood.
__________________
COMPLETE THE CENTRAL SUBWAY BY 2020!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted May 18, 2005, 7:37 PM
LAMetroGuy's Avatar
LAMetroGuy LAMetroGuy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Long Beach
Posts: 3,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongBeachUrbanist
The Downtown Connector is the single most important mile-and-a-half rail project that can be built in Southern California. It will close the gap in the light-rail system, and in so doing provide for tons of people a single-seat ride to, from and through Downtown LA.

After that, I pick the Red Line to Westwood.
my thoughts exactly
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted May 18, 2005, 8:58 PM
sbocguy sbocguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 860
Yeah, I picked the DT Connector also, with the Wilshire Red Line an extremely close second...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted May 19, 2005, 5:48 PM
BrighamYen's Avatar
BrighamYen BrighamYen is offline
I ♥ DTLA
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: L.A.
Posts: 6,507
Nothing will have a larger impact on Los Angeles as a whole than having a subway reach Westwood, IMO. It'll finally CONNECT two regions long segregated. Having a subway through Beverly Hills and Century City stopping at UCLA, will be the talk of the country (and of course LA). The tremedous benefits the subway will have for one of the busiest corridors in North America will have a ripple effect on the perception of rail in LA by causing people from all over to demand more rail (especially throughout West Central).
__________________
DTLA RISING | With Brigham Yen
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted May 19, 2005, 7:39 PM
POLA's Avatar
POLA POLA is offline
urbanphile
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: The Western Addition
Posts: 2,130
LIght Rail: Downtown Connector

So, is the idea of a heavy rail connector just a pipe dream now? Well, if it's light I think it will have to be raised!
__________________
I'll make no subscription to your paradise.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted May 19, 2005, 7:58 PM
Easy's Avatar
Easy Easy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Inglewood, CA
Posts: 887
The downtown connector by a long way.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted May 19, 2005, 10:46 PM
LongBeachUrbanist's Avatar
LongBeachUrbanist LongBeachUrbanist is offline
Ridin' The Metro
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Metro Blue, Wardlow Stop
Posts: 2,574
Quote:
Originally Posted by POLA
LIght Rail: Downtown Connector

So, is the idea of a heavy rail connector just a pipe dream now? Well, if it's light I think it will have to be raised!
We already have a "heavy rail connector" - it's called the Red Line!

Light rail refers to compatibility with the light-rail systems. So a light-rail train can be underground, surface, or elevated, or any combination. For instance, the Blue Line north of Pico is a light-rail subway, and the Eastside Light Rail will be underground for almost 2 miles.

I think the light-rail connector must be grade separated - either underground or elevated. Any benefits of rail will disappear due to traffic congestion, if the train is subject to street traffic.

I'd prefer a light-rail subway all the way to Little Tokyo or Civic Center, where it would emerge from a portal to connect with the Gold Lines.
__________________
COMPLETE THE CENTRAL SUBWAY BY 2020!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted May 19, 2005, 11:08 PM
Wright Concept's Avatar
Wright Concept Wright Concept is offline
I just ran out of B***sht
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 2,338
I believe next up to Bat for the MTA should be the Downtown Connector, because with the Tunnel Sections of the connector, it can provide the push and momentum to repeal the Prop A funding Ban,
*which dominoes into possible funding the Subway to Westwood
*Which begins the discussion of something for the 405 Freeway or some direct connection to LAX/Green Line with the Red Line.
*Then all the connector pieces start to fall into place such as, increasing tracks and service on Metrolink to feed the Connector and the Red Line.

The connector sparks the chain reaction!
__________________
"Statistics are used much like a drunk uses a lamp post: for support, not illumination." -Vin Scully
The Opposite of PRO is CON, that fact is clearly seen.
If Progress means moves forward, then what does Congress mean?

Last edited by Wright Concept; Jan 23, 2006 at 11:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 12:12 AM
lakegz's Avatar
lakegz lakegz is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beijing
Posts: 7,685
I put the downtown connector because of what it would facilitate. Its a great base to start with.

My heart wants more freeways though.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 6:44 AM
Art Art is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Eastside!!!
Posts: 2,887
Dtc for the sheer practicality, although wilshire redline is a close second and whittier redline is sniffing it's ass for third.



I have a DTC kwestion that I has been bugging me: If(and it should be) it is undergound thru downtown where and how will it rise up to at-grade level? First street is way too narrow in LilTokyo all the way to past alameda, which makes this a tight situation. Another liltokyo station will have to also be built on first street just west of alameda if line routes switch one day(ela-expo,blue-pas).

I still wish someone could negotiate that meruelo/sci arc guy to develop that empty lot on first street instead. Since the goldline station is gonna be placed on the edge of that lot, they could save some dough by combining a trench-style station and the buildling undergound parking excavation. But I wonder how nimbyish the temple just east of this lot would be to such a move too.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 3:51 PM
Wright Concept's Avatar
Wright Concept Wright Concept is offline
I just ran out of B***sht
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 2,338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art
Dtc for the sheer practicality, although wilshire redline is a close second and whittier redline is sniffing it's ass for third.



I have a DTC kwestion that I has been bugging me: If(and it should be) it is undergound thru downtown where and how will it rise up to at-grade level? First street is way too narrow in LilTokyo all the way to past alameda, which makes this a tight situation. Another liltokyo station will have to also be built on first street just west of alameda if line routes switch one day(ela-expo,blue-pas).

I still wish someone could negotiate that meruelo/sci arc guy to develop that empty lot on first street instead. Since the goldline station is gonna be placed on the edge of that lot, they could save some dough by combining a trench-style station and the buildling undergound parking excavation. But I wonder how nimbyish the temple just east of this lot would be to such a move too.
The only street that could work is running it underground or elevated on Temple and then have it come to grade before Alameda. Then trains could turn North up to Union Station en route to Pasadena/SGV or South to Little Tokyo en route to East LA.
__________________
"Statistics are used much like a drunk uses a lamp post: for support, not illumination." -Vin Scully
The Opposite of PRO is CON, that fact is clearly seen.
If Progress means moves forward, then what does Congress mean?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 5:37 PM
jessie_sanchez's Avatar
jessie_sanchez jessie_sanchez is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: California's Dirty South
Posts: 587
I think the GoldLine should be extended from Pasadena westward across Eagle Rock, Glendale, Burbank, and into Hollywood, and meet up with one of the RedLine stations....preferable Vine Station....but of course that will never happen.
__________________
I'll buy that for a Dollar!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 5:41 PM
LongBeachUrbanist's Avatar
LongBeachUrbanist LongBeachUrbanist is offline
Ridin' The Metro
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Metro Blue, Wardlow Stop
Posts: 2,574
Since the Eastside Extension is being built above ground, it looks like Temple east of Alameda will be the best place for a Connector Portal. This would locate the wye-junction at the only place that is feasible: Temple/Alameda. This also makes for very flexible routing.

I can't imagine the Connector would be elevated as it passes City Hall on Temple Street. Too much security risk, as well as the fact that it would block views of one of LA's most important landmarks.
__________________
COMPLETE THE CENTRAL SUBWAY BY 2020!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 6:07 PM
Art Art is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Eastside!!!
Posts: 2,887
so where would the alignment fo the DTC go north fom first street to temple?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 6:13 PM
Wright Concept's Avatar
Wright Concept Wright Concept is offline
I just ran out of B***sht
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 2,338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art
so where would the alignment fo the DTC go north fom first street to temple?
I'm not sure I follow your question.

I was thinking of a portal between San Pedro and Alameda that comes to grade at Alameda, which should create an interesting wye so that trains can run North or South on Alameda from Temple. Trains running South on Alameda would stop at Little Tokyo and follow the East LA Gold Line routing.

__________________
"Statistics are used much like a drunk uses a lamp post: for support, not illumination." -Vin Scully
The Opposite of PRO is CON, that fact is clearly seen.
If Progress means moves forward, then what does Congress mean?

Last edited by Wright Concept; Jul 9, 2005 at 8:48 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted May 20, 2005, 11:08 PM
LongBeachUrbanist's Avatar
LongBeachUrbanist LongBeachUrbanist is offline
Ridin' The Metro
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Metro Blue, Wardlow Stop
Posts: 2,574
Art, the Connector would come out of the tunnel somewhere on Temple, heading toward Alameda. The junction would allow trains to go in either direction - up toward Union Station/Pasadena, or south toward Little Tokyo/East LA.

This picture shows one way it could work. Red is heavy-rail, Blue and Gold are light rail. Notice the Blue-Gold junction at Temple/Alameda:

__________________
COMPLETE THE CENTRAL SUBWAY BY 2020!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted May 21, 2005, 3:12 AM
Art Art is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Eastside!!!
Posts: 2,887
OK, I git it.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted May 25, 2005, 3:50 PM
Wright Concept's Avatar
Wright Concept Wright Concept is offline
I just ran out of B***sht
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 2,338
Post Reuters Article

US dependence on foreign oil growing - experts
By Robert Gibbons
1 hour, 35 minutes ago



U.S. dependence on foreign crude will keep growing despite efforts to spur domestic production, as demand in the world's largest energy consumer outpaces output, industry and government experts said Tuesday.

The rising need for oil shipments to the nation's ports could even hit a level soon that foreign crude producers might have a hard time matching -- translating into likely declines in the nation's stockpiles.

"The longer-term trend points to increasing imports and increasing reliance on imports," said Doug MacIntyre, analyst for the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the statistical wing of the Department of Energy.

"Most people expect that over the next couple of weeks we might see crude inventories begin to fall, because to maintain 10.5 million (barrels per day of imports) or more would be a high level," he said.

The United States is currently processing about 15.5 million bpd of crude oil into fuels, with little more than a third of that supply coming from domestic fields, according to government data.

Recent high crude futures prices, reaching a record $58.28 a barrel on April 4, have attracted a flood of imports and helped raise U.S. crude inventories to a six-year high at 334 million barrels as of May 13.

Refineries are expected to increase their crude oil consumption to around 16 million bpd in the coming weeks to feed summer gasoline demand and stockpile enough heating oil for the coming winter, requiring an unprecedented sustained flow of imports.

"We're only producing domestically about 5.5 million bpd of crude, which includes Alaska," said MacIntyre. "In order to keep inventories from falling when we reach 16 we will have to import 10.5 million bpd."

The prognosis for increased foreign dependence comes as U.S. lawmakers struggle to hammer out an energy bill. President Bush's administration hopes to open up to drilling parts of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and provide tax incentives to spur exploration.

"Drop in a bucket," said Rick Mueller, Oil Manager at Boston-based Energy Securities Analysis Inc.

"The volumes they're talking about, by the time they start to come on line in 2011 or 2012, probably will not match up with growth in U.S. demand alone, and that doesn't take into account continued decline of other U.S. fields."

In the most recent government data, U.S. crude oil imports jumped nearly 900,000 bpd to 10.86 million bpd in the week to May 13, the fourth highest weekly average on record.

Oil demand in the United States has grown about 2 percent since 2003, while domestic production has slumped about 30 percent to 50-year lows due to declines in mature oil fields. New production from the Gulf of Mexico has helped offset the decline in onshore domestic output this year.

"Imports? They represent the past of the U.S., the present and the future," said Tim Evans, senior energy analyst at IFR Energy Services.

"Two years ago we were importing about 9.5 million bpd. Last year we were hearing a lot of hand wringing from the Department of Energy about how we didn't know if sustained imports above 10 million bpd is possible.

"Now it's not only possible, it's routine and we're pushing 11 million bpd as the upper threshold," said Evans.

All agreed that the mathematics point to a need to include production and conservation in the mix of solutions.

"The mathematics would dictate looking at both sides of the equation, supply and demand," said MacIntyre.

"Absolutely, a greater emphasis on conservation, particularly auto fuel efficiency, is really the largest untapped source of barrels," said Evans. "We're unlikely to boost domestic output a million bpd..., but it would not be that hard to save a million bpd."

Evans noted that with the U.S. gasoline demand averaging around 9.5 million bpd, "if we were to knock that down by million, that would be a 10.5 percent improvement. And if you have a sports utility vehicle that currently gets 15 miles per gallon, you would need an increase only to 16.6 mpg in order to make that 10.5 percent."

"We could basically do that with our eyes closed," said Evans. "Just when you see the ad for the Hummer, turn the page. But that's not something U.S. refiners would like to see, and is not something automakers want to see because their product and profit mix are more based on the truck type vehicles."



Copyright © 2005 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters. Reuters shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.
__________________
"Statistics are used much like a drunk uses a lamp post: for support, not illumination." -Vin Scully
The Opposite of PRO is CON, that fact is clearly seen.
If Progress means moves forward, then what does Congress mean?
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 6:11 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.