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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 4:01 AM
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Exclamation Hollywood Projects

Peterson Building

7001 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, CA



The Petersen building is a two-story historic commercial building located at the northwest corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Orange Avenue. It is owned by the CIM Group. The property owner proposes to add nine floors to the building and create an eleven-story hotel with 300 rooms. Agency staff has reviewed the design concept but the project description has not been finalized. Agency staff will assist CIM in the environmental analysis process, obtaining entitlements and identifying parking. Total projected expenditures in the next five years are $100,000 including Agency labor costs.

Hollywood & Vine








Currently under development, the Hollywood & Vine community calls for an exciting, mixed-use project offering 262 luxury apartments, a 300-room hotel (with 96 luxury condominiums to be operated by W Hotels) and over 60,000 square feet of street level retail space. Supporting these diverse uses will be two to three levels of subterranean parking.

Two, 12-story buildings facing Hollywood Boulevard will house the hotel and condominiums. The base of these buildings will be devoted to retail stores, restaurants and an MTA station. These steel frame, high-rise buildings will total approximately 297,000 square feet.

A third, five-story building ? fronting on Vine Street, Selma Avenue and Argyle Avenue ? will provide 262 luxury apartments situated above 55,000 square feet of retail space.

Hollywood & Vine, which will be available for leasing in 2007, is being developed by Legacy Partners and Gatehouse Capital.

The Broadway Building



The Broadway Hollywood building was originally constructed in 1927 as the Broadway Department Store. It is a 10 story concrete and steel structure that was designed in the Classical Revival Style. In 1939 Donald Parkinson designed a 8 story addition to the west of the original structure. Interestingly, this addition was not designed to match the original building, but has it?s own identity as a Streamline Moderne structure. Over the years the building has been converted into office space for a variety of tenants.

The proposed renovation and reuse of this property, coverts the existing buildings into luxury residential condominiums with parking on the basement and mezzanine levels and retail/restaurant uses on the street level. The residential portion of the project includes a historically sensitive addition on the 1940?s building which will bring it?s height in line with that of the original structure. The units will range from 850 square feet to 2000 square feet; the majority will be one level with some rising up to three levels. The design concept within the units is one of open and flexible space. There are bedroom locations highlighted on the plans, but dividing walls will not be constructed in order to allow the future owners the utmost flexibility of lifestyle. The roof area will be developed with an exercise room, Jacuzzi, swimming pool and cabanas. The layout will highlight the spectacular views of the Hollywood Sign and Hollywood Boulevard to the west. The construction on this project is anticipated to begin Spring of 2005.

Major Mixed-Use Project Planned for Pantages Area



After turning away developers for more than two decades, the family that owns the Pantages Theatre is planning a $300 million entertainment-themed development that would surround the Hollywood facility.
A deal with an unnamed New York developer could be reached within weeks for a mixed-use project that would contain entertainment, housing and subterranean parking, among other possible features, said Neil Papiano, an attorney representing Nederlander Producing Co. of America Inc.

It would dovetail with other large housing, retail and hospitality developments already under way in the area surrounding the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street.

James M. Nederlander, who runs the family company that owns the Pantages and several acres of surface parking lots along Hollywood Boulevard, wants to redevelop the stretch east of Vine Street as an entertainment and theater destination, said Papiano, a partner at Iverson Yoakum Papiano & Hatch.

Until now, no developer’s proposal has measured up to his vision. But nearby projects have taken root, and changed the outlook for the type of project Nederlander has in mind.

Adjacent to the site, Dallas-based Gatehouse Capital Corp. and Foster City-based Legacy Partners Inc. are seeking final approvals to develop a $325 million complex of housing and retail anchored by a nearly 300-room W Hotel. Condo conversions at the Equitable Building and the Hollywood & Vine Plaza are also under way.

In April, Nederlander hired the New York-based real estate investment firm Holiday Fenoglio Fowler LP to recruit developers, and the proposal from the New York developer has emerged as a frontrunner. A contract could be in place within six to eight weeks, Papiano said.

The developer’s proposal calls for a $300 million mixed-use project with shops, restaurants, housing and an expansive underground parking garage, according to attorney Benjamin Reznik, a partner with Jeffer Mangels Butler & Marmaro LLP, who is representing the New York developer.

Nederlander, whose company owns 26 theaters worldwide, is also interested in a boutique hotel and possibly a second live theater for plays. Papiano said Nederlander recognizes that putting all those pieces together into one development may not be feasible yet.

Reznik said neither the hotel nor the live theater is in the developer’s current proposal but he said each could still be added. “Right now everything is conceptual to make sure everything is economically viable,” he said.

Both attorneys said their clients believe a deal could be reached between the Nederlanders and the developer within weeks. “I personally believe we could have an agreement by the end of the year,” Papiano said. “That being said, (Nederlander) has waited this long so I don’t think we’re in any sort of rush either.”

Nederlander, who runs the company with his son, is not interested in selling any of his property and, because he wants to retain control over the development of the site, he will only consider entering into long term land leases. He did not respond to a request for an interview.

Beyond the surface parking lots, the Nederlanders own a patchwork of properties extending east along Hollywood Boulevard from the Pantages that includes the Henry Fonda Music Box Theatre and the Hollywood Palladium.

The family also owns the Wilshire Theatre in Beverly Hills and has a long-term lease with the city of Los Angeles to operate and manage the Greek Theatre in Griffith Park. Though the company is mostly based in New York, it is co-headquartered in Hollywood, the site of its concert promotion division.

Over the past six years, Nederlander has had about five serious offers to develop its Hollywood Boulevard parcels. Two years ago, a developer proposed building a Hard Rock hotel. Last year another developer wanted to blanket the lots with condominiums and apartments.

But Nederlander feels housing should be off Hollywood Boulevard, Papiano said, toward the rear of any proposed development. Anything on the boulevard “should all be entertainment-related or commercial-related.”

Until now, this agenda may have been economically unfeasible. But with the large number of apartments and condominiums under development nearby, an active restaurant and club scene, and the W Hotel going up across the street, that situation has changed, Papiano said.

“I get the feeling people out there looking at this feel more confident of what he has in mind than they did previously,” he said. “The kinds of proposals we get now are much closer to his original vision.”

Because so many developers had unsuccessfully courted the Nederlanders, builders and civic leaders said they had written off any construction for decades. For that reason, officials at the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency were surprised when Joseph Morningstar, a senior managing director at Holiday Fenoglio Fowler, notified them Nederlander had retained the firm. So were officials in the office of Councilman Eric Garcetti, whose 13th District includes the site.

“It’s more than they have ever done before,” said Josh Kamensky, Garcetti’s press deputy. “No one has been courted by more convinced suitors than the Nederlanders. Now, however, they are the ones pitching the idea of developing those parcels so there’s a sense it’s more serious than it has ever been before.”

Helmi Hisserich, deputy administrator for the CRA’s Hollywood region, said Nederlander had always wanted to develop the area to build more parking for the Pantages and give theatergoers more activities once shows let out.

Hisserich said construction on the Hollywood & Vine project that features the W Hotel could begin in 2006 and take two years to complete. She said it was feasible Nederlander could begin construction on a project by that time as well.

“It’s doable, totally doable,” she said. “We’ve always anticipated there would be higher density development at Hollywood and Vine.”

Still, Papiano said Nederlander hasn’t signed an agreement and could still decide to hold off on developing the land. “He takes the long view,” Papiano said. “He didn’t buy all this land to develop it and make some quick money. He’s in it for the long haul.”

Hollywood & Orange Building


From The Blvd.


East to West


Rooftop


Upper Deck


North to South Grand Passage

A design collaboration by JAG and Roto Architects, the proposed Hollywood Orange is an ambitious retail center development, sited at the corner of Hollywood Blvd. and Orange, on the west side of the famed Grauman's Chinese Theatre

The program includes multi-level retail, and a rooftop dining terrace with a view of street activity below. The contemporary design of glass and steel has a transparent facade and an open court, promoting fluid interactivity with the street.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 4:47 AM
KarLarRec1 KarLarRec1 is offline
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God I hope they change the designs for Hollywood/Orange.

And we really need to get the Peterson Building up and renovated soon! It is a key building in expanding the revitalization of the boulevard.

Thanks for the compilation!
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 6:39 AM
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Agreed about the Hollywood & Orange Building. That does not seem like appropriate design for the area.
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 6:52 AM
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Ditto. It makes Hollywood and Highland look like Rockefeller Center.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 10:27 AM
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Thanks for the list. cant wait to see all these under construction. The Hollywood/Vine + Sunset/Vine area is going to be off the hook in a few years.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 6:29 PM
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^ Don't forget

Hollywood/Vine + Sunset/Vine + Hollywood Blvd down to Hollywood/Highland filled with shops and things to do!
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 6:47 PM
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As for the Hollywood & Orange building... I kinda like the dramatic affect this building would add to Hollywood.

I was also glad to read about the addition of 9 floors to the Peterson Building, an eleven story hotel on that corner would rock!

Its great that developers are looking up to the sky!
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 7:03 PM
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Anyone have timelines for these projects, like the Orange and Peerson? I know the orange porject has been mentioned a few times in the past as well but i have never sen anything anywhere else.

LAB, that would be the ultimate goal, to have the whole street be poppin and developed with bars, clubs, resaurants, housing, etc
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 7:34 PM
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IMO, the best thing about Hollywood's resurgence is the residential component, because it will act as insurance for the area during tough economic times and slow tourist seasons. Mid- to high-rise residential will also bring higher standards for the look and feel for the street.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2005, 11:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongBeachUrbanist
IMO, the best thing about Hollywood's resurgence is the residential component, because it will act as insurance for the area during tough economic times and slow tourist seasons.
What I like is that much of the new development is not geared strictly for tourists in the way the Hollywood & Highland complex was originally. The only way to truly revitalize areas like Downtown and Hollywood is by first creating an environment that is attractive to the locals. Once that happens the tourists will follow.
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Old Posted Apr 11, 2005, 6:57 AM
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It looks like they've dusted off the plans for that tinkertoy Hollywood & Orange Complex once again. The first time the owners of that parking lot tried pushing that idea, it was met with fierce and vocal opposition from local preservationists. It may have its place, but not next to Graumman's Chinese.
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Old Posted Apr 11, 2005, 8:04 AM
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yeah, that thing should not be next to the Chinese theater. It looks too out of place.
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Old Posted May 1, 2005, 6:42 PM
KarLarRec1 KarLarRec1 is offline
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I wasn't sure which thread to resurrect...

BIG CHANGES AT HOLLYWOOD & HIGHLAND

I was at their website just looking for some news. They'd set up a page giving some details about the improvement projects.

http://www.hollywoodandhighland.com/bigchanges.html

* For one thing, it seems they are now branding themselves as "Hollywood & Highland Center."

* Virgin Megastore (with a stage for live performances)

* Escalator from street to Central Courtyard

* Escalators from Central Courtyard to 3rd and 4th floors. (DUH!!! should have been done originally)

* Improved storefronts (not sure why or where)

* Improved signage (to curb confusion through the maze that is H&H)

* Recent new stories: Lucky, American Eagle, BCBG.

* New stores in the future: Neighborhoodies, Quizno's, Virgin Megastore.
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Old Posted May 1, 2005, 7:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarLarRec1
I wasn't sure which thread to resurrect...

BIG CHANGES AT HOLLYWOOD & HIGHLAND

I was at their website just looking for some news. They'd set up a page giving some details about the improvement projects.

http://www.hollywoodandhighland.com/bigchanges.html

* For one thing, it seems they are now branding themselves as "Hollywood & Highland Center."

* Virgin Megastore (with a stage for live performances)

* Escalator from street to Central Courtyard

* Escalators from Central Courtyard to 3rd and 4th floors. (DUH!!! should have been done originally)

* Improved storefronts (not sure why or where)

* Improved signage (to curb confusion through the maze that is H&H)

* Recent new stories: Lucky, American Eagle, BCBG.

* New stores in the future: Neighborhoodies, Quizno's, Virgin Megastore.
It needs it. Poor H+H was poorly designed by Trizec...instead of open and inviting, it's cold and confusing. Such great potential too!

It'll always have its place due to the prime location, but think of what it COULD have been....sigh.
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Old Posted May 1, 2005, 8:08 PM
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OMG!!! Neighborhoodies??? I love that brand!
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Old Posted May 1, 2005, 8:56 PM
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Bernd: the only way they were able to make H+H a reality in Hollywood at that time was to design exactly such a *stand-alone* complex...

funny how times change in new Hollywood--
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Old Posted May 1, 2005, 9:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarLarRec1
* New stores in the future: Neighborhoodies, Quizno's, Virgin Megastore.
According to the website, the Neighborhoodies store at H+H is already open.
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Old Posted May 1, 2005, 9:23 PM
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Cool, thanks! Looks like it's in that alley of shops leading to the Kodak.
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Old Posted Jun 1, 2005, 7:44 PM
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June 01, 2005

Background: Christopher A. Joseph & Associates prepared the environmental documentation for the Hollywood and Vine Project.

Lead Agency: City of Los Angeles
Project Applicant: Legacy Partners and City of Los Angeles

Daily News
June 1, 2005


Looking to add to the glitz and glamour of the restored Hollywood area, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a $325 million public-private partnership to build a 296-room W Hotel as well as condominiums, apartments and retail space.

In its 13-0 vote, the council agreed to put $4.8 million of public funds into the project -- mostly for land acquisition costs in the Hollywood and Vine area. It is in addition to some $40 million already spent on various projects in Hollywood.

"People ask me, why we're doing this, what is the value to the city when we are already seeing good development," said Councilman Eric Garcetti, who represents the area.

"Well, the answer is that for a $40 million investment we have leveraged $1 billion in economic development. And that's more tax dollars into our coffers to hire police, to build parks, to provide services."

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority controls about 75 percent of the land needed to accommodate the project -- the MTA has a Red Line subway station at the intersection -- and the total public investment would be about $4.8 million, mostly for land acquisition, according to the city's Community Redevelopment Agency.

Legacy Partners would develop 350 apartments, including 74 units reserved for low-income renters.

Gatehouse Capital and its equity partner, HEI Hospitality Fund Acquisition, would build the W Hotel, a boutique chain owned by Starwood Hotel & Resorts Worldwide.

The only other W Hotel in the Los Angeles area is in Westwood. The brand is known for chic, modern rooms and amenities such as spas and personal trainers.

The city's past investments in Hollywood have had mixed success, with its biggest failure at the Hollywood and Highland Development, with the original developers selling out for a fraction of the initial cost, and the city losing money on its investment in a parking structure.

Garcetti said the city has learned from its mistakes and has done well overall with its participation in Hollywood.

Still, some owners of small businesses oppose the project, which would abut a $300 million mixed-used project planned by The Nederlander Organization.

Robert B. Blue, whose family trust owns the vintage 1929 Herman Building at 1642 N. Vine Street, said the development would kill his business, Bernard Luggage, at the same location since 1950.

"It is very hard for a business to stay in business after moving from a long-term, established location," he told the council.

"The developers for this project are big boys and girls and can perform the project on a smaller scale, or on the same scale, without taxpayer handouts and government assistance. Just follow the leads of the neighbor across the street, the Nederlander family."

Leron Gubler, head of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, defended the project.

"We believe this is a real win-win project for Hollywood and Los Angeles, a tremendous public-private opportunity," he said. "We're having a $325 million project with relatively low public investment. It will be the catalytic project for the Hollywood and Vine area."


(Excerpt copyright 2005 Daily News)
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Old Posted Jun 1, 2005, 8:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAMetroGuy
Robert B. Blue, whose family trust owns the vintage 1929 Herman Building at 1642 N. Vine Street, said the development would kill his business, Bernard Luggage, at the same location since 1950.

How come owners of really nice businesses often are the first to abandon ship, or go bust after a short while, while the owners of no BFD stores end up as hangers-on or nuisances? Blue's store may not be as bad as the bail bond businesses that have become common sights in Little Tokyo over the past few yrs, which some ppl in that hood have complained about, but he's prob not much better either.

Only problem I have with this proj is now that I've heard it has reached a final stage of planning, I grow even more impatient to see it finally under actual construction. I can put up with only so many Ralphs type delays, & I remember several months ago thinking the owners of H & V already had started work on the site near Hollywood & Vine.
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