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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2004, 6:05 PM
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Exclamation Long Beach Construction (Planned, Proposed, & Current)

High-Rise Projects

Golden Shore Master Plan

function: Residential (1,370 units)
location: Current site of the Union Bank building
Tower 1 - floors: 36 (420 feet)
Tower 2 - floors: 36 (420 feet)
Tower 3 - floors: 36 (420 feet)
Tower 4 - floors: Unknown
Tower 5 - floors: Unknown

completion: 2012
developer: Molina and Keesal, Young & Logan, Medak

Rendering:



Broadway & Main Towers

function: Residential (1,300 units)
location: current surface parkinglot north of World Trade Center & Long Beach Hilton
Tower 1 - floors: 55
Tower 2 - floors: 45
Tower 3 - floors: 35

completion: 2010
developer: Molasky Pacific California LLC

Rendering:


Shoreline Gateway
function: Residential (310 units)
location: northwest corner of Ocean and Alamitos
Gateway Tower - 35 Stories (417 feet)
Terrace Tower - 21 Stories (233 feet)
Courtyard Tower - 12 Stories (124 feet)

developer: Anderson Pacific LLC



Rendering:



432 Condo Tower

24 story tower (281 feet)
432 West Ocean Boulevard
Long Beach, California 90802
Developer: Ensemble Real Estate

Rendering:


Symphony Tower

24 story tower (250 feet)
Developer: Ensamble Real Estate
207 Seaside Way
Long Beach, California 90802

Rendering:


150 W. Ocean
function: Residential (216 units)
floors: 21
completion: 2007

Rendering:


Edgewater

function: Residential (155 units)
floors: 22
completion: 2007

Rendering:


West Ocean Long Beach
function: Residential (246 units)
Tower 1 - floors: 29 (341 feet)
Tower 2 - floors: 21 (257 feet)
completion: 2007

Rendering:


Press Telegram Lofts
October Five Development is proposing one 22 story tower:




Broadway Tower
Ensemble Real Estate is proposing a 180 foot 15 story condo tower with 176 condo units.
500 West Broadway
Long Beach, California 90802



Cedar Court
15-story Tower with 96 units over live/work units on the ground level 6-level underground parking

Rendering:






Mid-Rise Projects

Marriott's Residence Inn
Ensemble Real Estate is proposing a 115 foot 11 story hotel.

Rendering:


Grand Prix Place
Adaptive reuse of the former Edison Building which was also used as City Hall East for a short while:



Hotel Esterel at The Promenade

function: Hotel (12,500 square feet of retail and 39 units)
floors: 6
completion: 2008

Rendering:


AVIA Long Beach
function: Hotel (140 suites)
location: Rainbow Harbor
floors: 7
developer: Diversified Realty
completion: 2007

Rendering:



aLoft
Starwood aLoft by W Hotels
6-story Hotel building.

Rendering:


Low-Rise Projects

Pacifica

function: Mixed-use (5,196 square feet of retail and 62 units)
location: southeast corner of 1st St. & Promenade
floors: 5
completion: 2007

Rendering:



Promenade Walk - The Olson Company

function: Mixed-use (13,000 square feet of retail/shopkeeper and 97 units)
floors: 4
completion: 2006

Rendering:


Promenade Lofts - Lyon Realty Advisors

function: Mixed-use (11,200 square feet of retail and 104 units)
location: southeast corner of 3rd St. and Broadway
floors: 4
completion: 2007

Rendering:


BLU Long Beach
function: Mixed-use (30 units)
location: southeast of Long Beach and 4th
floors: 5
completion: 2008

Rendering:

Last edited by LAMetroGuy; Feb 25, 2008 at 8:42 PM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2004, 6:16 PM
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Desmond Bridge, Port of Long Beach, CA

Desmond Bridge, Port of Long Beach, CA
Photosimulation of proposed bridge allternatives

CURRENT DESMOND BRIDGE


Cable-Stayed Concrete with Twin Pilon Towers


Cable-Stayed Steel Composite with Diamond Towers


Cable-Stayed Steel Composite with Single Pilon Towers


Steel Tied Arch


Cable-Stayed Concrete with Single Pilon Towers
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2004, 7:10 PM
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Re: Long Beach Construction (Planned, Proposed, & Current)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LAMetroGuy
Ocean Villas
Long Beach, California
Ocean Villas is a twin high-rise multifamily project in the redevelopment area of Long Beach, California. The project consists of two 19-story above ground towers, each with 3-story subterranean levels of parking. The project will encompass a total of 576 units and 630,000 square feet. The entire project will feature very high, upgraded finishes throughout.
There has been a change with these.

Yesterday I read in the Long Beach Business Journal that Ocean Villas has changed its name to Aqua. Since there is such a demand for condos in downtown LB, the developer decided to sale them as condominiums. The article goes on to say more detail will be in the next issue in about two weeks.
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2004, 7:25 PM
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LIGHTBRIDGE

LIGHTBRIDGE - A LIGHT SCULPTURE FOR PASSPORT CENTER
Six 33 feet tall tech-deco pylons line Pine Avenue in pairs of two on either side of the street in a symmetrical pattern between Ocean Boulevard and First Street in Long Beach, CA. The layout defines Passport Center - a transit node for buses. During the day, the pylons act as placemakers defining the transit site; at night, the pylons glow with everchanging digitally created and controlled LED light patterns that ebb and flow to crescendos at 6:45 PM and 9:45 PM. Each night the abstract light phenomena changes according to season, holiday, and major events determined by the City of Long Beach and Long Beach Transit. A green laser component is added to the pylons in addition to the digitally controlled LED lights, creating a lightbridge above Pine Avenue. Laser lights weave a geometric pattern from pylon to pylon defining a light canopy above the street. Public artist Joe C. Nicholson created Lightbridge, the Long Beach community's collective symbolic memory in space and time. Joe C. Nicholson has been Professor of Design at NewSchool since 1984.




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Old Posted Apr 1, 2004, 11:06 PM
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PINE AVENUE RETAIL

Clashing visions of street's development
By Don Jergler
Staff writer


LONG BEACH - Growth is painful. Just ask business owners along downtown's Pine Avenue, a street that was once envisioned as Long Beach's version of Santa Monica's popular Third Street Promenade.

Instead of new upscale retailers and restaurants paired with thousands of new upper-middle income residents to elevate the demographics of downtown, Pine Avenue has a new discount shoe store, possibly a 7-Eleven and a growing homeless population.

But it's not all bad, and some would even say it looks like the street could turn the corner and begin fulfilling the promise of a becoming a destination where Southland residents come to eat, shop and play.

A swanky concert and dining venue and a trendy Spanish tapas bar are among a handful of new businesses that have signed leases for Pine storefronts.

With that in mind, one could say the continuing Pine Avenue saga has got it all the good, the bad and the ugly.

Taking it to task

No one seems to knows if Pine will finally become the heart of downtown's ongoing renaissance.

So business and property owners, who have complained that the city has focused too much attention on other "pet projects' and ignored Pine, have banded together to create a report card to keep track of elements of the street's development namely security concerns, homeless panhandlers, storefront vacancies and efforts to market Pine.

The Pine Avenue Coalition Task Force, a group of business and property owners with vested interest on Pine headed by Jeff King, owner of King's Fish House on Pine, have been meeting monthly to help steer progress along the street.

The task force has been formed at a time when restaurants on Pine are beginning to recoup customers that were lost for a period after a string of national restaurant chains opened at the Pike at Rainbow Harbor.

At least three new businesses have signed to go into Pine Square, which houses AMC Theatres. Two of those businesses will be fast-food restaurants to fill out the food court.

Leonardo's, an on-again, off- again nightclub in a landmark building, was recently sold for $3.8 million to a company that plans to turn the building into an upscale club similar to the House of Blues. It's tentatively being called The Vault.

Also set to open on Pine is Cafe Sevilla, a semi-swanky Spanish style restaurant that serves tapas (appetizers), with a bar setting and flamenco dancer. It's other locations are in Riverside, Carlsbad and San Diego.

When some people heard by word-of-mouth that a tapas bar was opening on Pine, it raised some eyebrows.

"Some people, they hear the word and they think its a topless bar,' said Melanie Fallon, executive director of community development.

Part of that worry stems from John Morris's announcement earlier this year that he planned to close Mum's and sell the establishment to a businessman who owned strip clubs in other parts of the city. Morris, considered a pioneer of Pine, has since decided to stay.

Gulp, discount shoes?

Some businesses that are opening Pine are raising more than eyebrows; they're raising the ire of more than a few.

Coming to Pine at Third Street is a $9.99 Shoes, a discount retailer that some believe does not fit the "high-end' retailer profile that should be opening there.

Retail recruiters hired by the city had convinced Blockbuster Video to lease the spot for one of their stores, but the owner of the property, Bernard Rosenson, declined the lease offer and opted to bring in his own tenant. He's within his legal rights to do so.

"The property owners have a right to lease to who they want,' Fallon said. "We had Blockbuster for there, and he didn't want them there. He didn't want a national credited tenant.'

Rosenson's decision has frustrated those working to improve the image of Pine.

"There was outreach to Mr. Rosenson in hopes of him embracing the strategy that we have endorsed,' said Kraig Kojian, president and chief executive officer of the Downtown Long Beach Associates (DLBA). "The property owner really does have the final say with what to do with his own property.'

Rosenson, who also owns the Sky Room on Locust Avenue, could not be reached for comment.

Then there's the proposed 7-Eleven going in place of the now-defunct Leader Drugs at Pine and Broadway.

When the pending lease agreement was made known to business and property owners along the street, the finger-pointing began, and blame was affixed on the city, on the owner of the property for failing to live up to a better image.

Still, the city has hopes that the 7-Eleven can serve the dual purpose of catering to a growing downtown residential population and sporting a look appropriate with the vision for Pine.

The 7-Eleven, which is being called an "urban walk-up store,' one of a handful in the 5,800- unit chain. The store will have a modern look, and serve low-carbohydrate, Atkins-type foods as well as sushi, and signature Big Gulps, too.

The chain has gone through several design steps with the city to ensure it's got the look, said Rob Zur Schmiede of the city's Redevelopment Agency.

The firm has been in a design review process with the city over the last several months and "we feel comfortable with the appearance,' he said, adding that 7-Eleven could be issued a permit to begin building in as few as four to six weeks.

Home(less) on Pine

One of the biggest hurdles to getting upscale tenants to Pine, say those trying to market the street is the homeless population.

Panhandling and the image of Pine as a hangout for the impoverished has dissuaded some companies from coming here, and is hurting night-time foot traffic, some say.

The blame for growth in the area's homeless population is being placed on nearby Lincoln Park, next to City Hall. The park has become a gathering spot for homeless, who come there to be fed by people. Cars and vans with loads of food can be seen pulling up to the park at lunch hour, some are college students, others are from churches.

While many of the homeless population at Lincoln are not criminals, others there have generated more calls to authorities for violence, drug dealing and possession and panhandling, Long Beach Police officer say.

"I'm not anti-homeless,' Sgt. Ernie Kohagura, who patrols the area on bike, recently told business owners, "but we have created our own major crime factory down here.'

The amount of crime being generated by the park's homeless population is drawing too much on police resources, and there's no way for police to remove the homeless from the park, Kohagura said.

"The police are basically hamstrung,' he said. "If you stop the feeding at Lincoln Park, you'd reduce the homeless population by 50 percent.'

Kohagura cited the need for a temporary shelter, "even a tent,' any way to find another place for homeless to be fed.

One idea being tossed out is to more strictly enforce health codes. Feeding people en masse requires a health permit. And that is not being enforced at Lincoln Park.

Councilwoman Bonnie Lowenthal, whose district includes Pine Avenue north of Third Street, believes that requiring health permits for homeless feedings will work toward addressing concerns of Pine businesses and ensure that the food given to homeless is safe.

The permit requirement "needs to apply across the board to all people,' said Lowenthal. "For a number of years the city has hoped to reclaim Lincoln Park for general use ...The issue here is there are competing public policy concerns.'

In fact, a plan to reduce downtown's homeless population has already been formed. Late last year the International Downtown Association sent a group of homeless experts to Long Beach to study the problem.

A resulting report cited several challenges, namely the absence of a year-round emergency shelter in the city.

The New Image Emergency Shelter, the area's only shelter, is open just during winter months. Operators of the shelter, which was temporarily located in a warehouse on the westside near Pacific Coast Highway, say they've had trouble finding locations because of restrictions placed on them.

Other challenges identified include land-use laws that prevent development of low-income housing, lack of funds to build shelters and insufficient resources to inform the homeless of available services.

The last challenge is beginning to be met by the Downtown Guides, paid bicycle-riding security officers who patrol the area for the DLBA.

Traffic wanted

One reason the homeless problem may be drawing attention is that there aren't as many people in downtown Long Beach as there are in other urban downtowns.

"I'm pretty sure you'd find more homeless on Third Street Promenade,' said Todd Cutts, DLBA's economic development manager. "The difference is the number of consumers walking up and down Third Street."

And that transformation is just what Cutts believes will happen when people begin to move in to the more than 3,000 housing units under construction or recently completed downtown.

As people begin moving into downtown, storefront vacancies will start being filled, Cutts said.

The city does not track square footage available for lease along Pine, but an unscientific survey of Pine from Ocean to Sixth by the DLBA not including CityPlace frontage, which is being filled with the likes of Contours and Quiznos shows there is roughly 63,000 square feet of ground floor space for lease.

Nearly half of that space is under negotiation for lease, Cutts said.

Until now, a problem with filling vacancies on Pine is that there hasn't been much interest from the commercial real estate community. But that's starting to change.

"Retail brokers, they're starting to get more involved as they're seeing these demographics moving into the area translate into dollar figures for them,' Cutts said.

A new retail tenant is about to sign up for Pine and First's Portofino, which closed in January, said Dave Co, with the Grubb & Ellis offices in Long Beach.

"The deal's pretty close to happening,' said Co, who tracks commercial real estate deals in the area.

Another spot on Pine that is getting new retail tenants is the Walker Building, on Pine between Fourth and Fifth streets.

The building, which has pricey condominiums on its upper floors, is getting a furniture store and a day spa, according to sources familiar with the pending deals.

"We are currently meeting with tenants for the street; there are a couple of key retailers that we are trying to make fall into place,' Cutts said. "If we do work it out and we do bring them into downtown, we feel like the dominoes will fall and they will come.'

Foot loose

Some have ideas to make those dominoes fall even faster.

"Closing down Pine Avenue for foot traffic only,' is an idea being thrown out by Becky Blair, owner of Blair Commercial Real Estate, which is leasing several properties on Pine, including Pine Square.

Her idea is to close Pine between First and Fourth streets on weekends, and placing kiosks along the street, or holding art fairs.

The closure, which Blair argues would generate greater foot traffic and make the street more of a destination spot, could eventually be made permanent.

More foot traffic will attract high-end retailers, who so far avoided Pine, she said.

"The clothiers aren't coming in, they're afraid to come in,' Blair said. "It's an island out there. We're trying to find something higher-end, but we end up with the 7-Elevens of the world and we end up with this $9.99 Shoe store.'

Twist of bitter, sweet

Pine has already had success, to a degree. On Fridays and Saturdays, lines of people can be seen waiting to get into bars like Club Cohiba, Mariposa, Alegria and New York Bryan's.

But that success has been bittersweet for Pine, as it has attracted crowds that sometimes get a little too rowdy, and are threatening to keep patrons out of other nearby establishments, such as King's, Mum's, L'Opera Ristorante and the Madison, those owners say.

To keep the peace, police have had to place extra patrol cars on Pine during bar closing times on Fridays and Saturdays.

Police records show that in one reporting district on Pine a nine-block area bordered by Fourth Street on the north, Broadway on the south, Long Beach Boulevard on the east and Pacific Avenue on the west there were 21 crimes reported in December.

Those crimes included two aggravated assaults, three commercial burglaries, one auto burglary, two grand thefts and one auto theft.

Things came to a head on a recent Saturday night and Sunday morning when three fights erupted almost simultaneously on the street one fight was reportedly near New York Bryan's, another near Club Cohiba and the third in the rear of Mariposa.

Officers who patrol the area have been told by their commanders they need to start preparing for summertime, "when more people will be out drinking and causing trouble,' a police source said.

Evolution

Others see Pine's evolution as more slow and painful than necessary.

"It is an evolution, one caused by the bad planning by the city,' said Morris, who was the first to put a restaurant on Pine Avenue when he opened Mum's 16 years ago. "It's unfortunate that were having to do things backwards.'

He added, "About three to five years from now, there'll be another evolution on Pine Avenue. It won't likely be an entertainment-driven street, because that's what it's become. Issues like noise and too many people will be resolved big time when you have residents.

"Residents vote and council people seem to react differently than when they're dealing with business owners.'
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Old Posted Apr 1, 2004, 11:39 PM
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I took my family around pine on a SUnday morning last summer and it was utterly dissapointing, although the blue line trips weren't. It was dead. But I recently went to hooters down thereand it was much more lively, lets hope they succeed in making it a better place to visit. BTW, blueline access should be emphasized big time.
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Old Posted Apr 2, 2004, 1:07 AM
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those developments are an exellent start and hopefully can get the ball rollin on creating a very vibrant sea side community there.
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Old Posted Apr 2, 2004, 1:47 AM
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I agree, the area has so much potential that I am surprised this hasn't already happened. Plus, the new restaurants being built on Pine Peer should be interesting also. I've been to the PF Cheng's (spelling?) and it looked really nice!

Regarding Pine Ave, I think that they will have a difficult time brining in high-end retail due to the Wal-Mart and $9.99 shoe store nearby. We'll see, but with places like The Vault and Cafe Sevilla coming into place... things may turn for the better!

Anyone know of any other development projects in LB? I was pretty surprised by the Embassy Suites project, an 11 story building will look great at that location. Right now its just a parking lot between the planned loft development (Insuranceexchangelofts.com) and Pine Street.
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Old Posted Apr 2, 2004, 7:31 AM
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Broadway Lofts:


The Promenade project:


Model of downtown at City Hall. I have one of the front which shows some of the new projects...if I can find it!


I must say that I am surprised that someone made a LB projects thread...I stopped doing them a few months ago due to lack of interest. Good to see people care
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Old Posted Apr 2, 2004, 6:11 PM
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Re: Re: Long Beach Construction (Planned, Proposed, & Current)

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisla
There has been a change with these.

Yesterday I read in the Long Beach Business Journal that Ocean Villas has changed its name to Aqua. Since there is such a demand for condos in downtown LB, the developer decided to sale them as condominiums. The article goes on to say more detail will be in the next issue in about two weeks.
Wow, that is great news! I had no idea, do you know how much they will go for? I would love to live there, esp with an ocean view!!!

Can you post the LBBJ article???

Here is a cool picture:


Last edited by LAMetroGuy; Apr 2, 2004 at 6:23 PM.
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Old Posted Apr 3, 2004, 12:04 AM
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Courtyard Lofts

New lofts on Pine Avenue!
Designed by Interstices.
These lofts will range in size from 750 –1,750 square feet.
The lofts will face an interior courtyard, some units will have bow truss ceilings and all will have private garages. These very cool lofts are all sold. If you would like to be put on our interest list for this project email us. You will be the first to know the latest infomation.



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Old Posted Apr 3, 2004, 4:48 PM
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Great finds.
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  #13  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2004, 10:38 PM
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2004, 10:42 PM
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1400 East Ocean

This project is to be built on 47,480 square foot unimproved parcel between the Ocean Club and 1500 East Ocean. The building plans call for 173 units, in a 16 story high-rise configuration. It is estimated that the average unit size will be about 1,500 square feet. The developer characterizes the product as "high end" and will price accordingly when the project is constructed. The marketing strategy is described by the developer as a pioneering approach. The sale effort will be focused in Taipei, Taiwan, and Tokyo, Japan. If the overseas market does not prove to be as good as expected, the domestic market will be exploited as a fall back position. The experience of the Ocean Club project is reported to demonstrate that the product will be acceptable to the Southern California market, but the overseas market is clearly primary. There is currently no time frame for this project.

Ocean Promenade Tower

The plans call for a 250-unit condominium project with 18,000 square feet of ground floor retail on the former site of the historic Jergins Trust Building at the southeast corner of Ocean Boulevard and Pine Avenue. The developer acquired the 21,100 square foot site in June 1990 for $7,200,000. This proposed 34-story high-rise, designed by the Landau Partnership, would be the tallest in the city. The proposal calls for a unit mix of 62% two bedrooms, 28% one bedrooms (7 with den), and 10% three bedrooms. There is currently no time frame for this project.

Mendik Development

This is a large scale Downtown Redevelopment project which has been in pre-development for over 10 years. The redevelopment Agency assisted in the assembly of the site which is about 2.2 Acres. It is located above the Convention and Entertainment Center on the south side of Ocean Boulevard at Linden Avenue. Proposed and entitled are two towers containing 556 units, to be built in two phases. There are no plans to proceed with the site development in the foreseeable future.
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2004, 7:33 AM
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Wow, if all of these projects (Mendik Development, Ocean Promenade Tower, 1400 East Ocean, and 1000 East Ocean blvd) are realized, this would make for a very interesting skyline. I am surprised about the 34 story Ocean Promenade Tower, that would be very nice!

Great find!
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Old Posted Apr 6, 2004, 7:10 AM
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Downtown Condo Project
Gets More Time



Plans to start building condominiums downtown got approved, for a second time, by the Planning Commission this week.

The property south of Ocean Boulevard and just west of Chestnut Place originally was part of the Camden development, but sold to Intracorp. Plans for 246 condo units on the land was approved last year.

This week, Intracorp was back before the commission asking for some changes to its project. While the overall density did not change, Intracorp wants to build the larger building first and the smaller one second, the opposite of the original plan.

The rest of the project — dealing with Victory Park, parking and other site details — remained the same. Work on Victory Park, which will include a renovation to put in green space there that can be used as a park, must be done as part of the first phase.

The commission approved Intracorp’s new plan unanimously.

What has been built so far at Camden’s Park at Harbour View, and through much of the rest of downtown, are apartments. City officials have pushed to have parts of these projects become condominiums, hoping that more home ownership will be a key to long-term success of the renovated downtown.

Intracorp’s project was designed as the second phase of Camden’s development. In the master plan for the Camden development, there were to be three towers on this site, one an office tower with about 100,000 square feet of office space. However, Intracorp decided the office tower would not work financially and scrapped it. The area where the office tower was to be will now be a parking structure, according to the plans, which will be used by tenants of the California Bank and Trust building as well as condominium tenants.

As they had at the previous meeting, commissioners said they were generally pleased with the design. Most of their questions focused around parking and traffic flow in the high density area.
_________________________________________________

I'm pretty sure that the larger tower is over 22 storys, though I really don't know.
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Old Posted Apr 6, 2004, 7:22 AM
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Pink is the two Intracorp towers, Blue is the Pine and Ocean (Jergen's Trust site) building.
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Old Posted Apr 6, 2004, 3:18 PM
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Hey LBn, where's that model located?
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  #19  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2004, 4:47 PM
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LAMetroGuy LAMetroGuy is offline
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I believe it is inside city hall.
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  #20  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2004, 5:42 PM
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SaF9 SaF9 is offline
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Oh crazy, I'll have to hit that up sometime.
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