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  #1  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2011, 9:16 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | Essex Crossing (SPURA)

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Future of the LES Includes 25-Story Towers, Chain Stores
Friday, March 4, 2011, by Joey Arak

There's still a good two years before SPURA, the largest city-owned swath of undeveloped parking lots this side of the Mississippi, has a final plan in place. But after 40 years of class warfare, Lower East Siders finally agreed to some guidelines. Surely that's something to get excited about, and the architecture firm hired by the city to study the site (mostly along Delancey Street near the Williamsburg Bridge) is giving the neighborhood something to chew on. At a community board meeting this week, Beyer Blinder Belle's Neil Kittredge gave a presentation about the firm's preliminary thoughts about this new mini-neighborhood within the LES. The Villager has a summary:

Kittredge said building heights on all 10 parcels would vary from six to 25 stories. The urban designer said there would be a mix of mid-rise buildings and high-rises, an underground parking garage to enhance the pedestrian experience and a design that would “maximize light and air.” He added that the current city-operated indoor parking facility on Essex St. near Delancey St. would not be affected.
In his slide show presentation, the urban designer outlined his vision of the new community. It showed sketches of streets filled with outdoor cafes and stores. He said smaller shops would be located on side streets, while Delancey and Essex Sts. would house stores run by larger retailers and chains. He said there would also be some second-story retail stores along Delancey and Essex.
http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...ain_stores.php

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  #2  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2011, 2:31 PM
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This is one of the oldest devlopments currently going.
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Old Posted Nov 7, 2012, 1:00 AM
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http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2012...ld-for-decades

City Council OKs Massive LES Redevelopment Plan On Hold for Decades





October 11, 2012
By Serena Solomon


Quote:
In a landmark moment, the City Council unanimously voted Thursday to give final approval to a huge development plan for the Lower East Side that has been delayed for almost half a century. The Seward Park Urban Renewal Area plan, or SPURA, will see 1.65 million square feet of housing, park and retail space built as well as potential for school on a group of underused blocks near Delancey Street.

The idea for the development has been on the table since tenement buildings were pulled down in 1967 to make way for a highway and other developments that never materialized. This current SPURA proposal has been meandering through the city's review process known as ULURP for the last few months, receiving approval from Community Board 3, the City Planning Commission and now the City Council with a vote of 48 in favor and zero against. Mayor Michael Bloomberg will now be given a five-day window to veto the plan, but he is unlikely to do so.


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Old Posted Nov 7, 2012, 1:45 AM
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I always wondered if it was just a matter of time before LES (being so close to the two most important CBD's in the country) would see more expensive housing.
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  #5  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2012, 1:55 AM
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^

There's also a new luxury apartment building that'll soon go up across the street to the north of that site. Can't find the link, but only 8-15 stories I'd imagine.
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  #6  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2013, 3:51 PM
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http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...TATE/130219931

Biggest developers eyeing massive LES project
Interest in building a six-acre, mixed-use project just south of the Williamsburg Bridge that is 40 years in the making draws 300 to a meeting with the city. Top architects are also queuing up.






By Matt Chaban
February 15, 2013

Quote:
More than 300 people showed up Monday for an information session on the project hosted by the city's Economic Development Corp. and the Department of Housing Preservation and Development. According to a copy of the attendance sheet obtained by Crain's, a number of the city's top developers, builders and designers were in the audience, along with local civic groups and cultural institutions.

Among the developers who sent representatives were such heavy hitters as Forest City Ratner, The Related Cos., the Lefrak Organization and Douglaston Development. Avalon Bay, the Arlington, Va.-based company that recently developed two large complexes on the Bowery, sent someone, as did Edward J. Minskoff Equities, which is developing a new office tower on Astor Place. There were a few high-profile upstarts at the presentation, including Ziel Feldman's HFZ Capital and DDG Partners, a developer of a number of downtown boutique condo projects. Affordable housing builders also made a strong showing, with Jonathan Rose Cos. and L+M Development among them.

Last year, the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area was rezoned by the city after more than 40 years spent trying to decide what to do with a handful of parking lots at the eastern end of Delancey Street. The eight-block area was cleared in the 1960s as part of urban renewal efforts, but they were never rebuilt and have languished for years as the city and locals fought over the fate of the plots.

The Bloomberg administration has made it a priority of getting this mega-development—along with a handful of others from Hudson Yards on the West Side to the Kingsbridge Armory in the Bronx—underway before the mayor's term expires this year. On Jan. 9, the EDC and the city's Department of Housing Preservation and Development released a request for proposals for the parcels, with plans for 1.65 million square feet of new development.

This will include 1,000 apartments, 50% of which will be set aside as permanent affordable housing. EDC wants a 60/40 mix between housing and commercial development, with a mix of shops, community and cultural spaces and public open space, including a redesigned Essex Street Market. Bids are due May 6.


In addition to the city's top developers, many well-known design and construction names turned out for the meeting, including architects Robert A.M. Stern, SOM, Rafael Viñoly, Ishmael Leyva and Aquitectonica; engineers ARUP, Consentini Associates and Stantec; contractors Lend Lease and Cooper Robertson; and brokers Cassidy Turley and CBRE Group Inc. A number of community groups were also in attendance, including the Settlement Housing Fund, the Grand Street Settlement and Asian Americans for Equality, as well as cultural startups the Museum of Food & Drink and the Lowline, which wants to turn a neighboring trolley depot into an underground park.

This strong interest from some of the city's top firms only underscores how no corner of Manhattan remains untapped for development. Whereas top developers would have ignored, or even feared, the Lower East Side of yore, now it has become one of the last remaining frontiers for upscale development. As evidence, look no further than Extell's recent interest in developing a site near the Manhattan Bridge.
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  #7  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 2:56 PM
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http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...less_spura.php

Before Redevelopment, A Brief History of the LES's SPURA





February 27, 2013
by Sara Polsky

Quote:
Everybody's finally talking about the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area—SPURA for short—the largest spread of undeveloped Manhattan land the city owns south of 96th Street. Developer proposals for the site are due May 6, and all the major names are circling. And some not-so-major names, probably, since the request for proposals has been downloaded from the city's website 750 times. The level of interest is one SPURA hasn't seen in its half-century (but feels longer) history of waiting for redevelopment. But there were, as the Times reminds us, a few failed redevelopment schemes during that period.

The buildings on the site were originally razed with the goal of urban renewal, but the financing fell through shortly thereafter. The second major attempt to revamp SPURA came from the LeFrak Organization in the 1980s, but that attempt, too, collapsed. Most recently, in 2003, the city and opponents went head-to-head on plans to put lower- and middle-income housing on the SPURA lots, and the opponents won.

Affordable housing is still an issue now, even though development appears more likely to proceed. Several developers tell the Times they are hesitant to bid because of the amount of affordable housing (half of the 1,000 planned residential units) included in the SPURA plan; others wonder why the affordable housing has to be in a neighborhood where they could otherwise make some real money. But given the amount of interest so far, there will surely still be enough developers who want to play.



http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/27/re...agewanted=all&

After Years of Delay, a Lower East Side Gap Is Ready to Be Filled





By RONDA KAYSEN
February 26, 2013


Quote:
Nearly half a century after a neighborhood of tenements on the Lower East Side was razed in the name of urban renewal, the area — which happens to be the largest undeveloped swath of city-owned land in Manhattan south of 96th Street — is finally poised for redevelopment. Last month, the city released a request for proposals from developers, ending a bitter chapter in New York City’s development history.

The nine sites, including several parking lots along the south side of Delancey Street from Essex Street to the Williamsburg Bridge, make up 1.65 million square feet of space for development. The city’s proposal is a hard-fought compromise for a six-acre slice of Manhattan that has been a trigger point since nearly 2,000 residents were displaced and most of their homes bulldozed in 1967.

While the rest of the Lower East Side grew into a hip neighborhood of fashionable restaurants, chic hotels and glassy condos, the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area stood out as a dreary reminder of the failings of urban planning. But three years ago, the city gingerly revived discussions with vying neighborhood factions.

“Forty-five years is a very long time to look at those lots everyday, and that wasn’t something that we wanted to continue for another 40 years,” said Gigi Li, the chairwoman of Community Board 3. “I think this time when all the stakeholders were called, we were really hoping that this would be the time that everything would move along.”

For decades, advocates of affordable housing sparred with residents of the powerful Grand Street co-ops, who preferred more market-rate housing and commercial uses for the site. The new agreement splits the difference, calling for 1,000 new units of housing, half of which will be permanently affordable. The 500 affordable units will be a mix of housing for seniors, and low- to moderate-income housing for families earning from 60 to 165 percent of the area’s median income.

The remaining 40 percent of the development area will be reserved for commercial uses, with up to 600,000 square feet of commercial space that will include street level retailing, and a hotel or office space. The plan also calls for 15,000 square feet of open public space and a new public school.
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  #8  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 11:07 AM
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Seward Park Developer To Be Announced Tomorrow
Ed Litvak
September 17, 2013


Tomorrow is a big day for the Lower East Side. The city is poised to announce the development team it has chosen for the Seward Park site.




Since this past May, when proposals were due, city planners have been working on selecting a developer for the nine parcels near the Williamsburg Bridge — a site that languished since 1967. Yesterday word began to spread throughout the neighborhood that the process had come to an end. Both successful and unsuccessful bidders received phone calls from city officials.

A community task force, sworn to secrecy, has been advising city agencies in charge of the project. Last night, at a Community Board 3 hearing, task force member David McWater, co-chair of CB3′s land use committee, said he had just returned from the offices of the NYC Economic Development Corp., where a Seward Park meeting had taken place. He did not specify the purpose of the meeting but there is little doubt today why task force members had been called together. Our information comes from multiple sources, but not from task force members.

The Seward Park plan calls for 1000 units of housing (50% of it affordable), a large amount of commercial space and a new Essex Street Market. The site is the most valuable city-owned development parcel in Manhattan. City officials were intent on selecting a developer before Mayor Bloomberg leaves office at the end of the year.


Can't wait to see what they've come up with! They have had about half a century of prep-time after all....
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  #9  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 4:59 PM
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NEW YORK | Spura | Multiple buildings | 25fl, 20+fl, 13 fl

Hi,

new development on LES's Essex and Delancey street in New York City
This is from ny.curbed.com:


this image is from the mayor's flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nycmayo...ce/9800514414/
You can find many more images there.
Now to the curbed article:
Quote:
After about a half-century of attempts and failures to remake the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, or SPURA, the city has finally made some decisions about the fate of Manhattan's largest swath of undeveloped land south of 96th Street. The news broke last night that developers L&M Development Partners, BFC Partners, Taconic Investment Partners, and Grand Street Settlement won their bid for the site, and the resulting project, called Essex Crossing, will be designed by SHoP and Beyer Blinder Belle...
and:

Quote:
The site will include retail, restaurants, a movie theater, parks, office space, and an Andy Warhol Museum. ....In addition, the project, to be called Essex Crossing, includes a 15,000-square-foot open space, a new and expanded Essex Street Market, a dual-generation school operated by the Educational Alliance, a community center run by Grand Street Settlement, a rooftop urban farm, the Andy Warhol Museum, 250,000 square feet of office space and a diverse mix of retail space. Seward Park will also become a hub of small-business incubation, with micro-retail spaces and creative and tech co-working and incubator space....
No mention of height yet.

Both quotes are fromt eh same article on curbed.com "The Future of the Lower East Side's SPURA Revealed!
Wednesday, September 18, 2013, by Sara Polsky
http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...ealed.php#more

Last edited by LordYu; Sep 18, 2013 at 5:56 PM.
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  #10  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 5:15 PM
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First post

OMG i screwed up my first post. Can't believe I forgot to write which city it is in . Now its only displayed as Spura instead of NEW YORK | SPURA.
how do i change that?
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  #11  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 6:56 PM
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wow, sort of sucks that they'll be redeveloping the essex market, it's pretty awesome as it is, definitely something out of the old lower east.

hopefully, as part of the redevelopment, there's something done about the tree canopy along delancey, it's hellish out there in the sun. could use trees spaced every 10 feet AND a nice solid green meridian down the center of the street from the bridge. such a minor investment would do so much.
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  #12  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 6:59 PM
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Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 7:02 PM
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So underwhelming but not SHoP's fault; this is a major disappointment and an underutilization of space.
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  #14  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 7:17 PM
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It's better than the parking lots that are there now. And also, it blocks out the view of the public housing high rises, so that's a benefit.
What do you mean by its not SHoP's fault?
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  #15  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 7:33 PM
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Development

Btw these are the blocks that are under development.


images at ny.curbed.com in an article by Sara Polsky "Developers, Architects Chosen, At Long Last, for SPURA": http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0..._for_spura.php
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  #16  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 7:40 PM
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Here you go...



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  #17  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2013, 9:09 PM
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This is a great looking project that will liven up the area that seemed quite dead IMO.
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  #18  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2013, 2:35 AM
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Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post
So underwhelming but not SHoP's fault; this is a major disappointment and an underutilization of space.
Agreed. Crazy that they could only put in 1000 units on that many huge blocks. It wouldn't even begin to put a dent in the crazy affordable housing shortage in the area. To put that into perspective, there's over 1300 units in the Silver towers alone and there's no subway stop there like there is one here.

This is what happens when the "community" has a say in what and how big something gets built. Yes it is better than vacant lots but this is a huge lost opportunity.
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  #19  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2013, 7:02 PM
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/artinf...tm_hp_ref=arts

Quote:
The Andy Warhol Museum, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, along with the other collaborators of this potential gallery space/annex in the Essex Crossing development, are excited about the possibilities and opportunities it could bring for us and to Manhattan's Lower East Side. Our hopes for this collaborative gallery, which would feature Warhol's work, is to further energize this exciting urban development project in Warhol's beloved New York.

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Old Posted Feb 14, 2014, 10:40 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | 60 Norfolk St



Lower East Side synagogue threatened by development
Angela Hunt February 14, 2014 03:55PM


From left: Synagogue at 60 Norfolk Street, Essex Crossing rendering

Quote:
The rabbi at a landmarked synagogue on the Lower East Side that has fallen into disrepair is pushing to preserve it in the face of a massive residential and retail development in the area.

L+M Development Partners is the developer of Essex Crossing, the 1.9-million-square-foot development that is part of the Seward Park urban-renewal project going up on the Lower East Side — an area where the synagogue, Beth Hamedrash Hagodol, has existed for 164 years. Now, experts say the so-called SPURA project will likely raise prices and endanger the house of worship.

Rabbi Mendel Greenbaum, who leads the congregation, once tried to have the 60 Norfolk Street’s landmark status revoked to sell to developers, but ditched that plan to avoid community outcry. The interior of the building is beyond rescue, according to the New York Landmarks Conservancy, but the outside is remarkably intact, the Wall Street Journal reports. The best course of action now, community stakeholders told the Journal, is to preserve the exterior and convert the interior for another use.

Ideally, L+M will be able to reach a compromise — air rights in exchange for money to restore and maintain the house of worship.
...

I think it would be more beneficial if the site was sold off for redevelopment-- it's not like people bothered to keep the place in good shape.
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