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  #61  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2008, 2:19 AM
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Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Has anyone been following the Greenbriar annexation? Apparently AK Tsakopoulis owns 500 or so acres north of North Natomas, and wants to build a new greenfield suburb on it. It's in the zone that just got de-certified from 100 year flood status, so nothing could be built until after the levees get fixed. RT is backing it because they think it could be a "transit-oriented village" stop on the DNA Light Rail line to the airport, although how and when they'll get Light Rail there through Natomas is still anybody's guess. Normally building the subdivision before the transit guarantees that the transit will never arrive (see North Natomas, which was also supposed to be a "transit-oriented village built without the benefit of transit.)

Methinks "transit-oriented village" is the new word for "suburb." There are other issues to consider--such as the fact that these suburbs, whoops, I mean "transit-oriented villages", are creeping closer and closer to the airport, and whether the folks who move there might suddenly realize that not only do they live in a flood zone and the promised Light Rail line may not arrive until they're ready to move to the retirement home, but that they're on the southern end of an airport runway.
KEY word Developer.....maybe he gets more money if its in the city vs in the county? what is the difference(metro air part is ready for development right next door now...all utilities and streets are in....nothing seems to be being built)
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  #62  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2008, 5:21 PM
travis bickle travis bickle is offline
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Originally Posted by urban_encounter View Post
Why do they call it "The Bee"???
To differentiate it

Last edited by travis bickle; Nov 17, 2008 at 11:04 PM.
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  #63  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2008, 7:00 PM
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Kobra starts work on hotel, stalls on center City, developer disagree over who would pay for convention center
By Mark Anderson of The Sacramento Business Journal

Friday, January 25, 2008

Alizadeh got an extension from the city of Roseville for permits for the conference center project, which is to be built next to the 279-room Embassy Suites.

The city has long sought a conference center, and it worked out a deal with Alizadeh's Kobra Properties LLC in July 2005 to subsidize the construction of a $13 million conference center as part of a development that would eventually include two hotels.

Almost from the time the project was approved, construction costs escalated dramatically. The conference center that originally was to cost about $10 million ballooned to almost $28 million. In addition to increased labor costs, raw materials costs for everything from concrete to wood to steel rose steadily. That cost spike has been an obstacle in negotiations ever since.

Alizadeh said his position is simple: "We're waiting for the city on the conference center. The city pays for the conference center."

The city's contract from 2005 has a not-to-exceed amount of $10 million for the conference center.

"We have an existing contract. And as long as that is an existing contract, there's not a lot I can say about it," said Craig Robinson, Roseville city manager.

The existing contract has the city subsidizing the center and eventually transferring ownership to Kobra. Roseville doesn't want to own the center.

And Alizadeh doesn't want to pay for the center. His hotel will do fine without a center, he said, noting the center is the city's idea.

Conference centers are difficult to finance because despite being expensive to build, they carry almost no value. They do, however, come with ongoing expenses to operate.

"It's been a difficult issue," Robinson said. "We're scratching our head on that. We think he should be building the center, too, but if we do get an Embassy Suites, that would be great."

Until the rain started this month, Alizadeh had crews starting construction on the hotel's underground work for sewer and water.

The permits for the conference center were about to expire, and they would have expired if no work was done on it, Robinson said.

"We were asked for an extension, and we granted one. It is a request that is often sought by developers, and it is something we often grant," he added.

"There is no question that a convention and conference center is needed," said Greg Van Dusen, executive director of Placer Valley Tourism, the marketing bureau for the cities of Roseville, Lincoln and Rocklin.

"I hope they can find some middle ground and get something started."

A conference center would help attract visitors to area hotels.

The area's room taxes are low -- a 6 percent transient-occupancy tax in Roseville, 8 percent in Rocklin and 10 percent in Lincoln.

The room taxes in the city and county of Sacramento are 12 percent, and the tax revenue is used to market the area, support arts groups and pay off bonding on the Sacramento Convention Center, Memorial Auditorium and Sacramento Community Center Theater.

There have been several attempts to increase Roseville's room taxes in the past couple of decades, but those taxes must be approved by a two-thirds majority, and residents of Roseville haven't approved a tax increase.

"If you look at the top destinations around the country, they tend to have the highest occupancy taxes. They are able to invest that into attractions and marketing," Van Dusen said.

The city of Roseville for 20 years has wanted a conference center for up to 1,000 people. It has gotten to exclusive negotiations for such a project five times, the most recent with Kobra in 2005.

The center should be opening this summer, according to the contract between the city and Kobra.

One bright spot for any eventual center is that the Embassy Suites rooms have a 6 percent fee added to them, which is to go to funding the center.
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  #64  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2008, 4:49 AM
econgrad econgrad is offline
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Friday, February 1, 2008
Sunrise Mall buy simplifies Citrus Heights revitalization
Steadfast owns multiple malls, plans to invest millions, buy more
Sacramento Business Journal - by Kelly Johnson Staff writer


The new owners of Sunrise Mall plan to pump in "millions and millions of dollars" to improve the property, but this week's sale also could open the door to a major redevelopment that takes in the huge Citrus Heights shopping center and the commercial district around it.

Steadfast Cos. closed the deal Tuesday to buy the 1.1 million-square-foot mall and much of the land underneath it for an undisclosed price, estimated by industry sources at more than $100 million.

Executives with the new landlord say they will pump cash into efforts to boost sales, attract strong new tenants and add to the dining and entertainment options at the regional shopping mall. They're also looking to do some more shopping of their own, scouting for other retail acquisitions in Greater Sacramento.

Steadfast -- a Newport Beach-based owner and operator of malls, industrial space, offices, apartments and resorts -- and its equity investors didn't just acquire most of the region's largest shopping center this week in the long-rumored deal. They also removed many of the complex ownership structures that were the single greatest obstacle to reinvesting in the property, said Jim Yoder, Steadfast's senior vice president of commercial properties.

The old ownership structure was knotty and still has some complications:

* Cordano Associates and a group of local investors called Sunrise Mall Associates each owned 50 percent of the mall building leases, except for those covering a few anchor-store spots.
* American General Life and Accident Insurance Co. owned the land under the mall.
* Macy's women's store and Sears own their buildings and the land beneath them. JCPenney owns its building and leases the land from a family of investors. Macy's men's store owns its building and leases the land; Steadfast is now the landlord.

Yoder would not disclose exactly how many square feet of buildings and acres Steadfast picked up in the deal. In addition to the mall itself, the transaction included some satellite, or "pad," buildings around the mall.

Steadfast and its partners bought the mall with cash equity and a loan from AXA Equitable Life Insurance Co.

This purchase of a regional mall during an economic downturn speaks to the strength of Sunrise Mall, the surrounding suburbs and the Sacramento region, Citrus Heights Mayor Steve Miller said.
The vision thing

Steadfast definitely has deep enough pockets, Yoder said, to fulfill whatever redevelopment vision for the area that landowners, city leaders and the Sunrise MarketPlace business improvement district ultimately agree upon.

Sunrise MarketPlace, with more than 500 businesses, is the city's economic engine, with the mall alone producing $200 million a year in sales -- and the sales tax that produces. The players in the business district have been cooking up redevelopment plans to keep the area viable for decades to come.

The ideas in play include pedestrian bridges linking the mall to Marketplace at Birdcage across Sunrise Boulevard; multi-level parking garages; more retail along the streets instead of a sea of parking; and more intensive development with a mix of shopping, homes, offices, entertainment and civic uses. The City Council is scheduled to hear a consultant's final report in mid-March on the vision for the district.

"We'd love to 'densify' the project in a way that would make sense for everybody" so customers would spend more time shopping, dining, watching movies or otherwise entertaining themselves at the mall and the surrounding area, Yoder said. "It could include mixed uses at some point."

Steadfast has followed the planning effort, Yoder said, but Steadfast still needs to understand the district's and city's goals and determine what aspects fit with its own goals. Before the deal closed Tuesday, Steadfast was limited by confidentiality agreements from talking with business-district representatives or neighboring landowners. Yoder is scheduled to meet today with Sunrise MarketPlace executive director Kathilynn Carpenter.

Steadfast's more immediate plans for Sunrise Mall are to focus on leasing and promotions, increasing the quality and perhaps the number of retail kiosks, and increasing "cross-shopping" between the department stores and shops inside the mall. The mall could use a modern theater with more screens; more clothing stores, especially those serving Generation X and Y shoppers; and more restaurants, furniture stores and a maternity store, Yoder said. He'd like to attract some of the best national, regional and local retailers that would pull in customers from a greater distance. Steadfast also wants to fill the former Albertsons grocery store that adjoins the mall.

With its purchase, Steadfast kept all 28 mall staffers, including longtime mall general manager Doyle Phelan.
Reaching out, looking around

The new owners have been using consultants to survey area residents about their shopping patterns and desires for the mall, an unusual move in the industry, and will incorporate that feedback into plans for Sunrise.

Yoder hopes to expand shop sales by 25 percent, from $360 per square foot to $450, and said Steadfast will invest "millions and millions of dollars" into the mall interior over the next two to three years.

Physically the mall is in great shape, he said, and the recent addition of a food court is a plus. Sunrise Mall has a "very strong foundation" and does not require the "major heavy lifting" of Steadfast's previous mall acquisitions.

Steadfast is enamored with the Sacramento area, Yoder said. The company has watched the metro's growth since buying the Yuba Sutter Mall in Yuba City in 2004, and "definitely" wants to buy more retail projects in Sacramento.

And elsewhere, he added. "We really have a problem saying 'no.' "

But it was the owners of Sunrise Mall who came knocking on Steadfast's door a year ago, Yoder said.

"It was never really officially on the market or listed for sale," said Doug Elmets, a spokesman for the Cordano family. Many of the mall partners, he said, felt it was time to sell "to pursue other long-term goals."

A spokesman for American General did not immediately have information about its sale of the mall land.

It's becoming less common for anyone to own huge shopping centers except real estate investment trusts or big companies with multiple regional malls.

"Owning a mall -- it's not a private endeavor anymore," said Matt Holmes, principal of brokerage Retail West Inc.

"Massive" organizations are needed to manage and operate malls these days, said Scott Reynolds, director of retail leasing in Northern California for Panattoni Development Co. Inc.

"Smaller families just don't want to play in that league. It's too risky," Holmes said.

It's also unusual that some of the original developers, the Cordano family, held onto the mall all these decades.
Multi-mall clout

Landowners, city and business-district officials, department store managers and retail industry players all expressed optimism over Steadfast's move. In addition to simplifying the mall ownership, Steadfast brings financial backing, along with the clout and relationships with national retailers that come from owning multiple malls. It has a track record of investing in renovations, thinking creatively and boosting sales.

"They have tenant relationships," said Carpenter, the business district executive. "There's just a little more leverage when you own more than one mall." She's impressed with Steadfast's decision to add a 45,000-square-foot LA Fitness sports club as an nontraditional anchor to its Everett, Wash., mall.

"They bring a fresh outlook and probably some good ideas, too," said Miller, the mayor.

"I think Sunrise Mall will be in very good hands," said John Pentz, president of Pentz & Partners Inc., a Newport Beach developer, broker and property manager. "They're energetic and creative."

JCPenney store manager Debi Arnold said she's pleased the mall will have a "new set of eyes" and hopes the new owners will increase marketing.

Macy's manager Karen Hamilton, who serves on the Sunrise MarketPlace board, hopes Steadfast can take the long view to help make the mall viable for the next 30 years. "What can we do to keep it current for the type of customer who shops now?" she said.

Getting all landowners to sign onto whatever redevelopment plan is crafted for Sunrise MarketPlace won't be easy. Just because the wish list might include a convention center or some other feature at a particular site doesn't mean the owners of that site will want to tear down whatever they have there. But "start with the mall," said Steve Patterson, who owns shopping centers in the district and around Greater Sacramento, and "you'll get a ripple effect."

As a major landowner, Steadfast "can really serve as a catalyst to the whole MarketPlace," Miller said.
Sunrise Mall

Opened: 1972

Size: 1.1 million square feet on 96 acres

Stores: Four department store buildings and 120 stores

Anchors: Macy's, Macy's Men & Home, JCPenney, Sears

Occupancy: 95 percent

Renovations: $10 million interior upgrade, 1999; food court added, 2007

Sales: About $200 million

Shop sales per square foot (excluding anchors): $360

Annual visitors: 9 million

Average customer visit frequency: Every 12 days

Total employment: 2,000

Mall employees: 28 plus about 20 outside contractors
Sellers

Land: American General Life and Accident Insurance Co.

Building leases: Cordano Associates and Sunrise Mall Associates

kjohnson@bizjournals.com | 916-558-7860

All contents of this site © American City Business Journals Inc. All rights reserved.
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  #65  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 2:15 PM
econgrad econgrad is offline
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Rancho Cordova to Buy, Raze "Problem" Apartments
Written for the web by George Warren, Reporter


Police were called to the Grandee Apartments 252 times in a single year

The city of Rancho Cordova will spend $1.3 million to buy a 22-unit apartment complex on Folsom Boulevard -- and then tear it down.

It's the first time the four-year-old city will purchase a problem property in the name of redevelopment.

"The focus is to bring Folsom Boulevard up to a level that Rancho Cordova can be proud of," said Economic Development Director Micah Runner.

According to a city staff report, Rancho Cordova police were called to the Grandee Apartments 252 times in a single year.

A neighboring merchant called the demolition plan "a blessing."

"It just draws a bad crowd," said Craig Roy, whose family has owned or managed an auto parts store for decades. "It's been horrible for business."

The owners of the apartment complex agreed to the sale, which should close in January. There are no immediate plans for the soon-to-be-vacant lot.

The city has allocated up to $160,000 to move the existing tenants to other affordable housing.

Created: 12/28/2007 5:42:32 PM

Updated: 12/28/2007 6:36:29 PM
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  #66  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2008, 9:31 PM
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Roseville Galleria announces new stores, 'indulge yourself' shops
By Jennifer K. Morita - jmorita@sacbee.com
Last Updated 1:14 pm PST Wednesday, February 20, 2008



Westfield officials have announced five new retailers that will be part of the $240 million Galleria at Roseville mall expansion, including a yoga-inspired athletic apparel company and a cosmetics store that makes beauty products using fresh, organic fruits and vegetables.

The newly named retailers are: Sephora cosmetics, Oakley Sunglasses, BCBG clothing, Lush cosmetics and lululemon athletic wear.

Larry Green, Westfield's senior vice president for the West Coast, announced the new retailers and revealed models of the ongoing expansion that will add variety to dining and group some stores for easier access by their targeted customers.

In addition to an outdoor dining terrace overlooking the mall's promenade area, Green said the food court will be revamped with an indoor fireplace and offer more sophisticated restaurants.

The children's play area will be moved, along with the indoor carousel, close to Sears, where stores selling children's goods will be grouped on the first floor and retailers catering to teens will be on the second level.

The "indulge yourself court" will feature high-end, luxury stores such as Burberry, Green said.

Cheesecake Factory will be the first retailer to open in May or June, followed by Crate&Barrel in its new mall location in either late summer or early fall. The first phase of the expansion is scheduled to be completed by November, Green said.

Other retailers announced earlier include Burberry, Kate Spade, Juicy Couture, Lacoste and Apple.
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  #67  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2008, 12:19 AM
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anybody know whats going on at UC Davis? They seem to be building something else next to the Mundavi center (not the new wine building)
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  #68  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2008, 1:25 AM
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anybody know whats going on at UC Davis? They seem to be building something else next to the Mundavi center (not the new wine building)
I think you may be referring to the new UC Davis Graduate School of Management and conference center:

http://www.gsm.ucdavis.edu/ExploreOu...388&m3=4&m1=94

The site will also include a 75 room Hyatt hotel to be built later. This is part of the new "front door" of UC Davis, which also includes the Mondavi center and the nearly complete complex for the Viticulture and Enology departments (which will also feature a vineyard). Lookin' good
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  #69  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2008, 5:45 AM
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Originally Posted by econgrad View Post
Friday, February 1, 2008
Sunrise Mall buy simplifies Citrus Heights revitalization
Steadfast owns multiple malls, plans to invest millions, buy more
Sacramento Business Journal - by Kelly Johnson Staff writer


The new owners of Sunrise Mall plan to pump in "millions and millions of dollars" to improve the property, but this week's sale also could open the door to a major redevelopment that takes in the huge Citrus Heights shopping center and the commercial district around it.

Steadfast Cos. closed the deal Tuesday to buy the 1.1 million-square-foot mall and much of the land underneath it for an undisclosed price, estimated by industry sources at more than $100 million.

Executives with the new landlord say they will pump cash into efforts to boost sales, attract strong new tenants and add to the dining and entertainment options at the regional shopping mall. They're also looking to do some more shopping of their own, scouting for other retail acquisitions in Greater Sacramento.

Steadfast -- a Newport Beach-based owner and operator of malls, industrial space, offices, apartments and resorts -- and its equity investors didn't just acquire most of the region's largest shopping center this week in the long-rumored deal. They also removed many of the complex ownership structures that were the single greatest obstacle to reinvesting in the property, said Jim Yoder, Steadfast's senior vice president of commercial properties.


I just caught Steadfast's presentation to the Citurs Heights City Council and it sounds like they're planning a major remodel and expansion of the mall; which was one of the reasons they worked to remove any possible obstacles to their expansion plans (as noted above and during the presentation).
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  #70  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2008, 5:36 PM
reggiesquared reggiesquared is offline
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±2.3 Million SF of Mid to High-Rise Office Buildings

Not sure if anyone knows about this or maybe im late to the game but this is huge! I saw a billboard go up by where I live a few weeks ago, decided to figure out what it was. Pretty impressive for being under the radar.

north natomas


http://www.loopnet.com/xNet/MainSite...tchedKeywords=
http://marketing.cbre.com/Sacramento...0-%20Email.pdf
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  #71  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2008, 7:22 PM
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Wow. For being in Natomas, that's a pretty sweet looking project. Too bad more of Natomas didn't shape up like this around its business centers...with light rail going straight into it. At least it looks like this plan has a station right at the front door.
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  #72  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2008, 7:47 PM
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On second look, there sure are a lot of surface lots. That rendering looks like is only one section of the whole plan.
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  #73  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2008, 9:40 PM
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The COMMERCE STATION submitted a draft EIR in September of last year and
not much has happen since. Here's a map of most everything going on north
of Sacramento as well as a link to all the reference numbers. Natomas PIPELINE

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  #74  
Old Posted Feb 29, 2008, 5:50 PM
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Anyone know what the massive warehouse is going up in Rancho Cordova/Gold River? It's on the opposite side of 50 from the Marriott near Sunrise? I'd say it's about 6-7 stories tall.
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  #75  
Old Posted Feb 29, 2008, 8:37 PM
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To me it looks like its going to be a public storage building. I think there is one right next to it and it could be expansion.
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  #76  
Old Posted Feb 29, 2008, 10:47 PM
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From downtown I can see a crane has risen for the Natomas Gateway tower.
The crane looks like the kind that would help assemble a tower crane, but it could
be the main construction crane for the project since the towers only 12 stories.
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  #77  
Old Posted Feb 29, 2008, 11:54 PM
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That parking lot still makes me sick to my stomach.
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  #78  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 12:56 AM
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That parking lot still makes me sick to my stomach.
The idea of building a "green" building in a sea of parking lots floors me too.
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  #79  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 2:06 AM
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I have no problem with the parking. There's a difference between living in an ideal world and a realistic world. This is Natomas area we are talking about, not NYC or SF. Green building or not, what company would want to lease that building if there was little or no parking?
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  #80  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 3:05 AM
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Originally Posted by otnemarcaS View Post
I have no problem with the parking. There's a difference between living in an ideal world and a realistic world. This is Natomas area we are talking about, not NYC or SF. Green building or not, what company would want to lease that building if there was little or no parking?
Look, I don't give a damn if this isnt NYC, SF, Tokyo, or whatever else. I am sick and tired of these developers raping our city with these parking lots and the city council needs to step up and call them out on it. You don't need 12,000 parking spaces for a damn 12 story building. In fact, those spaces need to be put in parking garages instead of a parking lot.
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