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  #81  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 5:06 AM
econgrad econgrad is offline
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Originally Posted by Majin View Post
Look, I don't give a damn if this isnt NYC, SF, Tokyo, or whatever else. I am sick and tired of these developers raping our city with these parking lots and the city council needs to step up and call them out on it. You don't need 12,000 parking spaces for a damn 12 story building. In fact, those spaces need to be put in parking garages instead of a parking lot.
Maybe in Downtown or even Midtown you have an argument, no way in Natomas. There's plenty of room, cars a plenty, and the people who live in the area would rather drive than use light rail.
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  #82  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 6:45 PM
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Originally Posted by econgrad View Post
Maybe in Downtown or even Midtown you have an argument, no way in Natomas. There's plenty of room, cars a plenty, and the people who live in the area would rather drive than use light rail.
More to the point, they *can't* use light rail, even if they wanted to, because it doesn't run anywhere near them, nor to this office park. If it does someday snake up this way, and Natomas somehow gets repaired into more transit-oriented form, much of this parking lot will doubtless sprout new buildings as the market changes. A parking lot isn't eternal. Which, I think, everyone here realizes--except for Majin.

Although I do give Majin credit for finally realizing that developers *want* to build parking lots, because they're cheaper than parking structures, and they realize that in the absence of transit alternatives, the only way to sell buildings is to include sufficient parking.
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  #83  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 1:03 AM
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^ True. But some of us want a choice, if we want to use our cars, it should be convenient. If we want to use public transit, it should also be convenient. We can have transit and parking lots both, freedom and choice is always a good thing.
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  #84  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2008, 10:51 PM
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Found an interesting article in The Atlantic Monthly about the suburbs as the slums of the future (shades of "Suburbia"!) which mentions Elk Grove, as well as many other such places around the country:

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200803/subprime
Quote:
The decline of places like Windy Ridge and Franklin Reserve is usually attributed to the subprime-mortgage crisis, with its wave of foreclosures. And the crisis has indeed catalyzed or intensified social problems in many communities. But the story of vacant suburban homes and declining suburban neighborhoods did not begin with the crisis, and will not end with it. A structural change is under way in the housing market—a major shift in the way many Americans want to live and work. It has shaped the current downturn, steering some of the worst problems away from the cities and toward the suburban fringes. And its effects will be felt more strongly, and more broadly, as the years pass. Its ultimate impact on the suburbs, and the cities, will be profound.

Arthur C. Nelson, director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, has looked carefully at trends in American demographics, construction, house prices, and consumer preferences. In 2006, using recent consumer research, housing supply data, and population growth rates, he modeled future demand for various types of housing. The results were bracing: Nelson forecasts a likely surplus of 22 million large-lot homes (houses built on a sixth of an acre or more) by 2025—that’s roughly 40 percent of the large-lot homes in existence today.

For 60 years, Americans have pushed steadily into the suburbs, transforming the landscape and (until recently) leaving cities behind. But today the pendulum is swinging back toward urban living, and there are many reasons to believe this swing will continue. As it does, many low-density suburbs and McMansion subdivisions, including some that are lovely and affluent today, may become what inner cities became in the 1960s and ’70s—slums characterized by poverty, crime, and decay.
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  #85  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2008, 4:31 AM
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Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Found an interesting article in The Atlantic Monthly about the suburbs as the slums of the future (shades of "Suburbia"!) which mentions Elk Grove, as well as many other such places around the country:

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200803/subprime
Wonderful article...I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in living in the city. Great catch wburg!
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  #86  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2008, 5:01 PM
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Anyone know what the massive warehouse is going up in Rancho Cordova/Gold River? It's on the opposite side of 50 from the Marriott near Sunrise? I'd say it's about 6-7 stories tall.
Sunrise Boat & RV Storage. This building is hideous. What an atrocity!

http://www.sunriseboatandrvstorage.com/index
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  #87  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2008, 7:19 PM
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Question:

If you drive around north natomas near the empty space by the freeway, you will see a bunch of CBRE signs that say "10 story class A office building comming soon", "7 story class A office building soon" and "mixed used residential/retail comming soon."

Theres about 20-30 of these signs scattered throughout north natomas, has there been any actual plans released? I've never seen any 10 story office building proposals for Natomas other than whats under construction right now.
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  #88  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2008, 7:31 PM
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Couple pages back...

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Originally Posted by reggiesquared View Post
Not sure if anyone knows about this or maybe im late to the game but this is huge! I saw a billboard go up by where I live a few weeks ago, decided to figure out what it was. Pretty impressive for being under the radar.

north natomas


http://www.loopnet.com/xNet/MainSite...tchedKeywords=
http://marketing.cbre.com/Sacramento...0-%20Email.pdf
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  #89  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2008, 8:47 PM
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Well that might cover the mixed use signs I saw, but I saw at least 5 signs saying 10 story office buidlings comming soon and at least 15 or so signs daying 7 story office buildings comming soon.
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  #90  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2008, 9:11 AM
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Friday, March 28, 2008
Developers in Rancho Cordova could get break on mitigation rules
General plan amendment would relax habitat preservation requirements
Sacramento Business Journal - by Celia Lamb Staff writer


Rancho Cordova officials might relax requirements for developers to offset the environmental impacts of new projects.

The city planning commission voted March 13 in support of amending the natural resources section of the city's general plan, a blueprint for its growth through 2050. City planning director Paul Junker said the City Council might consider approving the amendments April 21.

The new language would water down rules that protect wildlife habitat by adding the qualifier "where feasible" or "to the maximum extent feasible" to requirements for interconnected habitat, restrictions on roads through wildlife preserves and other development limitations. Economic and social factors could be considered along with environmental, legal and technological factors to determine feasibility. Channelizing creeks into concrete corridors, which previously would "not be supported," would now "be discouraged, but is not prohibited."

The proposed changes address issues raised in a lawsuit against Rancho Cordova filed by the California Native Plant Society in September 2006. The suit challenged the city's approval of an environmental impact report and entitlements for the Preserve at Sunridge, a 2,700-home development and commercial "village center" planned in the Sunrise-Douglas community.

In July, a Sacramento County Superior Court judge ruled that the plan for offsetting environmental damage from the project did not comply with the city's general plan. The mitigation plan should have identified locations and performance criteria for vernal pools, he decided.

Rancho Cordova city attorney Adam Lindgren said the judge simply misinterpreted the general plan. The city has appealed the decision.

"The lower court required a tighter fit (with the general plan) than the law requires," Lindgren said. "We want to address the legal standard for general plan consistency."

Although there is no direct connection between the lawsuit and the proposed general plan changes, "the lawsuit did show us how the general plan could be misinterpreted," Lindgren added.Junker characterized the proposed general plan alterations as minor housekeeping tasks.

"The scope of these changes is fairly narrow," he added. "We're committed to natural resource preservation, but we want to make sure the policy language is correct and really precise."

But environmental activist Carol Witham, who helped lead the CNPS lawsuit, said the proposed changes would introduce too much "wiggle room" for developers.

"That is a very troubling document," Witham said. "It completely dilutes any intent language down to essentially nothing. It was pretty good, strong language regarding natural resources initially."

She's also concerned with proposed changes that she thinks could diminish the roles of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the state Department of Fish and Game in helping the city craft requirements for mitigating environmental harm caused by new development. The proposed changes would put mitigation decisions in the hands of the city but allow for comment from the two agencies. Under the current general plan, the agencies work with the city to design mitigation plans.

The proposed changes would affect future projects, including four specific plans under review -- Westborough, Rio Del Oro, Suncreek and The Arboretum-Waegell.

"This won't affect projects already approved," Junker said. So, it won't help settle the lawsuit over the Preserve at Sunridge.

clamb@bizjournals.com | 916-558-7866
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  #91  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2008, 10:06 PM
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Wow! I had totally forgotten all about this. A 23-story hotel in Lincoln? Will this be the tallest building outside of downtown in the metro area? I remember the insane chaos when Thunder Valley first opened (was working in Rocklin at the time).



Source: www.sacbee.com/101/story/922065.html




Groundbreaking marks start of Thunder Valley expansion
By Art Campos - acampos@sacbee.com
Last Updated 2:09 pm PDT Tuesday, July 15, 2008

The United Auburn Indian Community will break ground Wednesday at Thunder Valley Casino near Lincoln on an expansion project that will include construction of a 23-story hotel atop the current gaming facility.

Besides the planned five-star, 650-room hotel, the facility will include a convention center, ballrooms, more gaming space, restaurants, a spa, a lounge, a 3,000-seat performing arts center and a parking structure.

The ceremony will begin at 11 a.m. at the south-entrance parking lot at the casino, 1212 Athens Ave.

Doug Elmets, a spokesman for the Indian tribe, which owns the casino, said in a news release that the expansion project will create about 1,000 construction jobs and 1,200 permanent jobs. Completion is set for July 2010, he said.

Analysts have estimated cost of the expansion to be $1 billion.

When completed, the project will generate $10.2 million in property tax, $900,000 in food and beverage taxes and $1 million in occupancy tax annually for Placer County.
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  #92  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2008, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by SacTownAndy View Post
Wow! I had totally forgotten all about this. A 23-story hotel in Lincoln? Will this be the tallest building outside of downtown in the metro area? I remember the insane chaos when Thunder Valley first opened (was working in Rocklin at the time).



Source: www.sacbee.com/101/story/922065.html




Groundbreaking marks start of Thunder Valley expansion
By Art Campos - acampos@sacbee.com
Last Updated 2:09 pm PDT Tuesday, July 15, 2008

The United Auburn Indian Community will break ground Wednesday at Thunder Valley Casino near Lincoln on an expansion project that will include construction of a 23-story hotel atop the current gaming facility.

Besides the planned five-star, 650-room hotel, the facility will include a convention center, ballrooms, more gaming space, restaurants, a spa, a lounge, a 3,000-seat performing arts center and a parking structure.

The ceremony will begin at 11 a.m. at the south-entrance parking lot at the casino, 1212 Athens Ave.

Doug Elmets, a spokesman for the Indian tribe, which owns the casino, said in a news release that the expansion project will create about 1,000 construction jobs and 1,200 permanent jobs. Completion is set for July 2010, he said.

Analysts have estimated cost of the expansion to be $1 billion.

When completed, the project will generate $10.2 million in property tax, $900,000 in food and beverage taxes and $1 million in occupancy tax annually for Placer County.


That's pretty cool. Wasn't Roseville planning a 8-10 story hotel, possibly Embassy Suites.
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  #93  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2008, 12:27 AM
econgrad econgrad is offline
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Roseville moves ahead with projects

Guest commentary: Roseville moves ahead with projects
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Published 12:00 am PDT Thursday, August 7, 2008

Last week, I outlined the city's budget for fiscal year 2008-09 and how we're adjusting to the housing slowdown, sales and property tax revenue decreases, rising fuel costs and the effect of the state's budget crisis on cities.

Taking these factors into account explains why the 2008-09 city budget is one of many contrasts. For while the economy slows, long-term fiscal planning combined with funding that was in place before the slowdown allow the city to move forward with several key projects.

Revitalizing downtown

The city continues to invest significantly in downtown Roseville with a $65 million, multiyear revitalization effort, funded through redevelopment bonds and specific funds for transportation, traffic mitigation, water and sewer rehabilitation and tree mitigation.

The first phase – historic Old Town – was completed in the spring, and we encourage community members to share their vision this fall as we meet to develop the specific plan for all of downtown Roseville.

Improving traffic circulation

Traffic circulation is another emphasis for the city and the community. While we expand commuter and alternative transportation options, our highest priority is continuing to support the state Department of Transportation and the Placer County Transportation Planning Agency in their efforts to improve Interstate 80. The completion of Phase 1 of the I-80 project has already provided a significant improvement in traffic flow in the eastbound direction.

Phase 2 is planned to start this month with additional high occupancy vehicle and auxiliary lanes both east and westbound from the Placer County line to Eureka Road. Funding comes primarily from state and federal sources.

Other high-visibility improvements will be made to the interchange at Pleasant Grove Boulevard and Highway 65, the Riverside Avenue streetscape and the Cirby Way corridor (Foothills Boulevard to Riverside Avenue), with funding coming from sources such as impact fees paid by new development, gas tax funds and redevelopment agency funds, not the city's general fund.

Enhancing programs

The quality of life we enjoy in Roseville is enhanced by our parks, libraries and recreation programs.

In addition to opening our 58th park this summer, and a new library and Utility Exploration Center earlier this year, the city has contributed $1 million worth of parkland and park development funds to set a foundation for the fundraising effort to create "universally accessible playgrounds" where children and parents of all abilities can play side-by-side.

Along with the new universally accessible playground envisioned for Mahany Park, plans call for the city's other regional parks – Royer and Maidu – also to be transformed into barrier-free, sensory-rich areas.

The city recently broke ground on the Central Park Aquatics Center with two indoor pools and solar panels providing year-round climate control. Construction is funded by developer fees, and operations will be self-funded by user charges, with anticipated completion in late 2009.

In addition, state and federal grants have made it possible to begin work on a permanent facility and new exhibits for the Maidu Interpretive Center.

These are just some of the projects happening in Roseville. To keep up with city news, visit our Web site at www.roseville.ca.us or get a copy of our semi-monthly newsletter, Reflections. It's available for download and as an e-subscription.

Looking ahead

While we tackle today's challenges, we remain committed to ensuring the long-term sustainability of our city. Our quality of life was recognized in the August issue of Money magazine when Roseville ranked 90th in the top 100 best places to live in the nation. What makes this city a great place to live is how our community comes together to dream big and to get things done.

We have tough choices to make now, but we will make them wisely and with citizens' interests foremost in mind.
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  #94  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2008, 3:59 PM
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Rose-ville has a downtown AND a historic Old Town? I seriously doubt it.
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  #95  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2008, 6:38 PM
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They do...Vernon Street is nominally downtown, as it is/was the main strip and business district. Vernon Street was part of historic Highway 40. There are still some pretty nice old buildings along the route, mostly 20th century, like the old post office and city hall, their Tower Theater, some nice Art Deco department stores and a few railroad hotels. South of Vernon Street there are some nice residential neighborhoods with late 19th and early 20th century bungalows and cottages--imagine a mini Midtown.

On the other side of the tracks, physically cut off from Vernon Street and the business district, is a small district of a few square blocks that are "old town" Roseville, right next to the old Southern Pacific/Amtrak station. There isn't a whole lot there, a few restaurants and a bar or two and a few offices, but for the most part it's pretty quiet. They have a historic bridge (a pedestrian and auto bridge that goes over the train tracks, the only way to get safely across the tracks before the underpass was built) and a nice little Carnegie library. Most are 19th century brick buildings, some I think dating back to when the town was still called Union.
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  #96  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2008, 8:22 PM
econgrad econgrad is offline
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^ There are 7 bars/clubs in Old Roseville.... with many "duesh bags in Roseville bars" as well (If you haven't heard that song yet, get with it). A new addition of some nicer bars and some that were upgraded. People "walk" from bar to bar just like in Old Folsom or Old Sacramento. Except there isn't the strong gang element that's in Old Sac.
Check it out sometime Ozone!

Last edited by econgrad; Aug 19, 2008 at 7:42 PM.
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  #97  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2008, 5:05 PM
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Friday, August 15, 2008
Region’s rich reside in Roseville, Elk Grove; Sacramento lags
Elk Grove beat Roseville in median income and home values, but fewer earn more than $200K

Sacramento Business Journal

Hefty paychecks and higher-valued homes helped Roseville and Elk Grove become two of the nation’s 50 wealthiest communities with at least 100,000 residents, at least before the free fall of the real estate market.

Sacramento — which boasts deep pockets in areas such as East Sacramento, the Fabulous 40s and Land Park — finished at No. 88, between Inglewood and Reno, Nev.

Of course, California’s once-booming housing market created some of the wealth factor, with five of the Top 10 cities and 17 of the Top 20, according to a just-released Bizjournals report based on 2006 data, the latest available.

Roseville, with median household income of $71,450 and a median home value of $473,600, finished at No. 37, the highest rating in the four-county region. Almost 5 percent — or one of every 20 — households earned at least $200,000.

Elk Grove, the nation’s fastest-growing city a few years ago and now better known as one of the hardest-hit foreclosure markets, finished at No. 43, just a few spots below cross-region rival Roseville. Elk Grove actually had higher median household income and median home values — $77,064 and $477,700, respectively — but fewer households that earned $200,000 or more per year, about 4.5 percent. Roseville’s per-capita income also outpaced Elk Grove, $33,916 vs. $28,379.

Sacramento ranked much lower, with median household income of about $46,000 and the median home value at $365,000.

While Roseville can enjoy some bragging rights, the city pales compared to others nationwide — and even a few less than 100 miles away.

Bizjournals identified 10 wealth centers — communities that manage to blend substantial size (populations above 100,000) with considerable affluence.

America’s top-rated wealth center, according to the study, is Arlington, Va., a densely settled suburb directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. Its population is 199,800.

Arlington residents are highly educated, with one-third of local adults holding graduate degrees. They have their pick of government, law or lobbying positions in Washington or high-tech research jobs in northern Virginia.

The result was a 2006 per-capita income of $53,543 in Arlington, the highest figure among the 261 U.S. communities with populations in excess of 100,000. That’s more than twice the national average of $25,267. Bizjournals ranked 261 communities. You can see the rankings at bizjournals.com/edit_special/69.html.

Bizjournals created a six-part formula to analyze the relative affluence of all cities, incorporated towns and unincorporated urban areas above the 100,000-person cutoff. The strongest scores went to places with high income levels and large inventories of expensive homes.

The study’s raw data come from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2006 American Community Survey, the most recent source for federal statistics at the local level. All figures are for specific municipalities, not for the broader metropolitan areas to which they belong.

Arlington leads the pack because of its consistently strong performance in all six categories. It ranks first in the study group for personal capital income, second for the percentage of households with incomes of $200,000 or more, third for its upper 20 percent income threshold (the dollar figure that surpasses 80 percent of local earnings), and fourth in median household income.

Wealthiest cities
1. Arlington, Va.
2. Thousand Oaks
3. Naperville, Ill.
4. Alexandria, Va.
5. Stamford, Conn.
6. Irvine
7. San Francisco
8. Scottsdale, Ariz.
9. Huntington Beach
10. Sunnyvale
37. Roseville
43. Elk Grove
88. Sacramento

Show me the money
• The collective per-capita income for the Top 10 communities is $43,782, which is 73 percent more than the national average.
• Almost 11 percent of all households within the designated wealth centers draw annual incomes higher than $200,000. The corresponding figure for the whole country is 3.4 percent.
• Median home values range from $416,400 to $806,700 in the 10 places atop Bizjournals’ rankings. The national median is $185,200.
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  #98  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2008, 6:50 PM
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Yet Roseville and Elk Grove both look like ass.
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  #99  
Old Posted Aug 19, 2008, 12:07 AM
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Yet Roseville and Elk Grove both look like ass.
So jealous....
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  #100  
Old Posted Aug 19, 2008, 7:45 AM
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Originally Posted by econgrad View Post
So jealous....
Jealous of what?
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