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  #241  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2008, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sprtsluvr8 View Post
Usually when you see a photo of downtown Dallas, there is mile after mile of flat area in the foreground and you can see flat land far past the skyline. When I've visited Dallas I was amazed at how far I could see...because it was so flat. I'm sure there are areas that have hills and the wilderness photos are pretty but not representative of the city of Dallas.
You know, I noticed this about Atlanta, too. If you look south from the Westin Peachtree in DT, it looks pretty flat, but you know damn well it isn't.
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  #242  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2008, 1:23 AM
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i would believe weather plays an important part in the migration. i went to nyc one winter, and although it wasn't alot colder than atlanta at the time, the combination of the shade and the wind made me miserable. new york is a great place, but i can't stand the cold, just as others can't stand the hot.
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  #243  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2008, 3:01 AM
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Forbes Ranks Austin Number 1

http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/

Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 2:32 PM CST
Austin economy spanks the competition
Austin Business Journal

High-tech, a booming film industry and the University of Texas all helped propel Austin to the top of Forbes' 2008 list of America's Fastest Growing Metros.

The magazine ranked Austin No. 1 among the nation's 100 largest metropolitan areas. The list sorted cities by their anticipated gross domestic product growth between 2007 and 2012. Austin's GMP, or the value of goods and services produced in the area, is expected to climb 32 percent over the five-year period.

Forbes credits the local boom to high-tech employers like Dell Inc. (NASDAQ: DELL) and IBM (NYSE: IBM) as well as the University of Texas, which is producing ample engineering talent.

Other cities that ranked high on the list include Atlanta, Seattle, Orlando, Houston and San Jose, Calif. The Forbes article points out that all of those cities share several key characteristics with Austin: They are tech hubs in close proximity to universities with growing population bases.

Forbes used GMP forecasts provided by Moody's Economy.com.

The regions of the country with the fastest growing metro areas overall are the Southeast and West. Forbes credits the lower costs of living and doing business in those areas for their higher anticipated performance.


To read full artical click link...
http://www.forbes.com/business/2008/...concities.html

Best Places
America's Fastest-Growing Metros
Brian Wingfield and William Pentland 01.30.08, 2:20 PM ET






It's no secret that the Southeast and Western United States are booming. The costs of living and doing business there are often cheaper there than in big coastal cities. But where and how much those cities are thriving might surprise you.

Take Alabama. The state has some of the fastest growing metro areas in the country, including Mobile, which is projected to have the greatest change in "gross metropolitan product (GMP)," 34% between 2007-2012, according to research forecasts done for us by Moody's Economy.com.

In Pictures: America's Fastest-Growing Large And Small Metros
One boon to Alabama is ThyssenKrupp's announcement last year to build a $3.7 billion steel plant in Mobile. And Huntsville--expected GMP growth 15% by 2012--has long been a hub for defense and space research. Since the mid-1990s, Alabama has also become a manufacturing center for automakers like DaimlerChrysler (nyse: DCX - news - people ), Toyota (nyse: TM - news - people ) and Hyundai.

"The automotive industry has been Alabama's real growth industry in the last 15 years," says Brian Hilson, president and CEO of Huntsville's chamber of commerce.

Other metro areas, like Port St. Lucie and Palm Bay, are part of a growing biotech cluster in central Florida. Straddling Texas and Arkansas, Texarkana is seeing war-related development: Its Red River Army Depot is a major maintenance and storage facility for military equipment. And St. George, Utah, located about 120 miles from Las Vegas, has boomed in recent years as a destination for retirees.

All of them sit at or near the top of Forbes' list of America's fastest-growing metropolitan areas, places large and small that offer at least the promise of booming economies for years to come.

To compile our list, we looked at all of the country's 363 metropolitan areas, defined by the U.S. Census Bureau has a geographic region with a "core urban area" of at least 50,000 people. Because many small metro areas are high growth--and because we wanted to show growth in large cities as well--we split the group into two classes: the largest 100 metro areas (with at least 528,000 people) and everyone else. We use projections run for us by Moody's Economy.com to show growth in GMP between 2007-2012.

Of course, if one looks at economic growth in the country's largest 100 metros, the usual suspects jump to the top of the list. With an estimated 32% GMP growth from 2007-2012, Austin, Texas, is the winner for big metros. Atlanta, Seattle, Orlando, Houston and San Jose, Calif., also appear high on the list. What do they all have in common? They're tech hubs with proximity to universities and a healthy increase in population. Austin's population, for example, is expected to increase by nearly 15% by 2012, according to Moody's Economy.com forecasts
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  #244  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2008, 6:08 AM
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The drought isn't slowing it down? Impressive.
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  #245  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2008, 9:22 AM
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Originally Posted by JDRCRASH View Post
The drought isn't slowing it down? Impressive.
There's plenty of water around. The thing keeping Atlanta back is the politics of it with the rest of Georgia and neighboring states. That's being worked out as we speak.
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  #246  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2008, 5:32 PM
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What's sad is that there are people out there that are willing to save some sort of fish instead of feeding millions of people the water they need and deserve.
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  #247  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 3:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDRCRASH View Post
What's sad is that there are people out there that are willing to save some sort of fish instead of feeding millions of people the water they need and deserve.
Wow, i was thinking the same thing. Atlanta is only in a drought if you count the water we have to sacrifice everyday to sustain the oyster population at the base of the Chatahoochie river. There is no drought without these nutso enviro's who think the oysters need millions of fresh clean water everyday, because I'm sure we all know that they (oysters) evolved due to the development of treated human waste into what we call "fresh water". i realize the environmental issues, however if you want fresh water for these oysters, then produce it yourself-Florida/Alabama!
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  #248  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 3:58 PM
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It's not just an environmental issue. It's a economic issue for the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast. We're talking the collapse of a whole ecosystem, just because Atlanta couldn't think ahead.
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  #249  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 4:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brickell View Post
It's not just an environmental issue. It's a economic issue for the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast. We're talking the collapse of a whole ecosystem, just because Atlanta couldn't think ahead.
Why is it Atlanta that didn't think ahead? I think the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast should think ahead and come up with some new water resources...maybe some that don't originate in Georgia. It works both ways, smart guy...
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  #250  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2008, 5:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brickell View Post
It's not just an environmental issue. It's a economic issue for the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast. We're talking the collapse of a whole ecosystem, just because Atlanta couldn't think ahead.
Well apparently you guys in the sunshine state got spared because Georgia took the hit for you; as you all are using the water they could be getting right now.
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  #251  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 2:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLksuGUY View Post
nutso enviro's
i just so happen to be a proud "nutso enviro", but the thing 'those people' don't/didn't understand is that you may be saving the oysters now with all that water, but when we run out of water, the oysters will too. why put the both of us through that?
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  #252  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 5:38 PM
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Is it economically reasonable to make such a sacrifice?

How big is the Oyster fishing industry?
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  #253  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2008, 4:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcathens View Post
Ice storms are more common in the piedmont region than most other regions in the country.
We may not always have accumulating snow, but snow falls from the sky every year.
I think the reason why Atlanta usually sees one (usually never more than one though) Ice storm a year is because the temps stay too warm for it to actually snow. Most of these ice storms are actually freezing rain. Snow or sleet falls from the sky then melts before reaching the ground. The temps may be just above or right at freezing but on impact the rain turns into ice, creating a big mess, especially for tree limbs and powerlines. Most of the snow I have seen is when temps are below freezing BUT not always.

Of course that is not to say that it never snows in Atlanta or gets below freezing....it definately does. Look at the weather map when we are getting a big weather system on the east coast. Middle and South Georgia are getting rain, Atlanta and northward getting freezing rain and ice and Tennesee and northward its usually snow.
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