HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum

Since 1999, the SkyscraperPage Forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web. The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics. Welcome!

You are currently browsing as a guest. Register with the SkyscraperPage Forum and join this growing community of skyscraper enthusiasts. Registering has benefits such as fewer ads, the ability to post messages, private messaging and more.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Sacramento Area

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 4:47 PM
arod74's Avatar
arod74 arod74 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: east Sac
Posts: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by innov8 View Post
I was always under the impression that the station would move up to
the 800 block section... I like this new location
I also like the new location! The plateform is too often a hangout for truant teens screaming at each other. Now if something can be done about all the mentally ill we might be on to something..
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 5:21 PM
Fusey's Avatar
Fusey Fusey is offline
Repeat!
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 5,364
Quote:
Keith Kaplan, a representative of Westfield Corp., owners of the Downtown Plaza, said "we have significant reservations about relocating the RT platform."


You have to admit, Westfield's showing some concern about DTP is quite humorous.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 5:25 PM
ozone's Avatar
ozone ozone is offline
Top Retributor
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Golden Capitol
Posts: 1,719
Great news.

Keith Kaplan, a representative of Westfield Corp said they have "significant reservations about relocating the RT platform." Who freak'n cares? A lot more of us have significant reservations about the Westfield Corp. I just don't understand these guys at all!

'Mayor Heather Fargo said she was frustrated that the conversation about the beautification plan, which she believed was an exciting development for downtown, focused almost solely on the station relocation.' For once I agree with Mayor Fargo

Members of various 'transit rider groups' criticized the station relocation-blah.. blah. Alan Miller of the Train Riders Association of California (?) arguments were completely disingenuous because I know he doesn't care about the money. Oh my god soon people will actually have to walk a 1/2 block to the new station? How inconvenient! What a hardship!

"traffic congestion (I'm assuming they mean pedestrian) could make it unsafe and would exacerbate safety worries by putting the station closer to a liquor store and the Greyhound bus station." What nonsense. Most of the people who use the Greyhound services are good, law-abiding, if less affluent, people. Besides if these people see a problem with the Greyhound station and cheap liquor stores then they should work on getting rid of those.

RT says it needs the new station for the outgoing Gold Line. So I'm right in assuming that they'll then spilt the two lines into two separtate stations and make the station at 7th/Capitol (on the next block) exclusively for the Blue Line (Meadowview) and the 7th/L station exclusively for Gold Line..or visa versa?
__________________
The point of cities is multiplicity of choice. -Jane Jacobs

Last edited by ozone; May 30, 2007 at 5:31 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 6:04 PM
travis bickle travis bickle is offline
silly slackergeek
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 450
Amen to both of the above. Sometimes it's hard not to laugh out loud at these clowns.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 9:48 PM
sugit sugit is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: DT Sacramento
Posts: 3,076
I was listening to the K Street meeting today, and there was a speaker that really caught my attention.

His name was Jim Brennan, he the one that is renovating the Atkins Building at 10th and K in the office condos and ground floor restaurant. He said he has also acquired the Kress Building, 920, 924, 930 K Street (which are the 3 buildings on south-west most corner of 10th and K) and the most intriguing, The Crest Theater.

He said they are going to reposition The Crest into a performing art center.

He's a Juilliard School Grad that has done projects in the Gaslamp, SOMA and was the main driver behind getting Louise Davies for seed money for the Louise Davies Symphony Hall in SF, along with work on the Opera House and Ballet Building in SF.

Seeing The Crest as a performing arts center would be a pretty darn cool thing. One down side though would be I'm not sure they would still show films.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 10:41 PM
wburg's Avatar
wburg wburg is offline
Hindrance to Development
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,072
The Crest, right now, is pretty multipurpose, in that they have films there, but also concerts, conventions, and speakers--what about it isn't already a "performing arts center"?

I'd sure hate to lose the Crest as a movie theater, though...it does pretty good business in that spot, and it certainly has its niche carved out. Besides, isn't there a performing arts center going in across the street?

Inclusionary housing is certainly not limited strictly to SRO residents: "low-income" in Sacramento County means anyone earning less than $36,000 a year, which is three times what folks on SSI make. This means that low-income and very-low income housing (the next category down, about $24K a year) is intended for people like service workers, office techs, restaurant employees, etcetera--the exact sort of people you want living close to their jobs downtown. It's kind of a weird irony when someone making $100K a year can live in a condo walking distance from their downtown office, but the guy shlepping lattes on the ground floor has to commute in from Orangevale because he can't pay downtown rents working minimum wage.

As to the SROs themselves, it's really easy to say they should go "somewhere else" but a lot harder to determine where that "somewhere else" should be, and what the current residents of "somewhere else" might have to say about it. There are plenty of examples of SRO-type housing, properly managed, that works well in existing urban neighborhoods: in San Francisco, the Tenderloin's SROs are very close to Union Square, and it doesn't seem to deter that neighborhood from being pretty active, day or night.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 11:28 PM
BrianSac's Avatar
BrianSac BrianSac is offline
CHACUN SON GOÛT
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,642
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
There are plenty of examples of SRO-type housing, properly managed, that works well in existing urban neighborhoods: in San Francisco, the Tenderloin's SROs are very close to Union Square, and it doesn't seem to deter that neighborhood from being pretty active, day or night.
I'm sorry, but I just cant stand "handouts".

I have a cousin who lives in SRO-type housing in a tenderlion apartment.

He pays pennys for the place because of handouts. He lives in an excellent location in a very nice apartment and contributes absolutely nothing to the SF economy and surrounding neighborhood. He just feeds off the system and has been doing it for years.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 11:39 PM
sugit sugit is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: DT Sacramento
Posts: 3,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
The Crest, right now, is pretty multipurpose, in that they have films there, but also concerts, conventions, and speakers--what about it isn't already a "performing arts center"?

I'd sure hate to lose the Crest as a movie theater, though...it does pretty good business in that spot, and it certainly has its niche carved out. Besides, isn't there a performing arts center going in across the street?
That's the part I don't know about. They didn't mention what type of performing arts center it would be. It would be nice it they could keep what they are currently doing and maybe renovate the main auditorium into a space that could hold accommodate bigger performances or concerts.

There is a new place going up across the street, but it's going to be a cabaret theater. I would imagine that they have something else in mind for The Crest, but there was no mention of what.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 11:47 PM
wburg's Avatar
wburg wburg is offline
Hindrance to Development
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugit View Post
That's the part I don't know about. They didn't mention what type of performing arts center it would be. It would be nice it they could keep what they are currently doing and maybe renovate the main auditorium into a space that could hold accommodate bigger performances or concerts.

There is a new place going up across the street, but it's going to be a cabaret theater. I would imagine that they have something else in mind for The Crest, but there was no mention of what.
"Renovation" to make the theater larger would mean demolishing the existing building and making it bigger, thus losing the last of K Street's original theaters (although it was itself a latecomer--the Crest was built to replace the burned-out Hippodrome.) Plus the place isn't exactly small as it is. The building was restored only a decade ago. If there are larger performances to be held, it seems like there are a few other options nearby: the community center, music circus, memorial auditorium.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 11:57 PM
sugit sugit is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: DT Sacramento
Posts: 3,076
When I say renovate, I don't mean demo. I highly doubt any changes to The Crest would involve any major demo. Improvements can be made without tearing things down and apart.

There are other options in the area, but there is major need for more mid size venues in this city. The ones you mentioned are too big for most users. The Crest main auditorium would be a middle ground size wise between the theatres you mentioned and smaller ones like the new one at 10th and K, Thistle Dew, or The Geery

As I said, there was no mention of what they are thinking or planning, but I am very interested to hear what it is.

Last edited by sugit; May 31, 2007 at 12:08 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 12:12 AM
ozone's Avatar
ozone ozone is offline
Top Retributor
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Golden Capitol
Posts: 1,719
I was walking past the First Northern Bank (7th and J street) and saw renderings of a proposed remodel of the ugly annex. It looked pretty cool. Of major importance here is the rear section on Merchant Alley across from St. Rose Park. Right now it's a blank ugly wall but the plans call a new facade and opening it up and I believe putting in a cafe or something like that. I hope it's still in the works. I'll try to get more info.
__________________
The point of cities is multiplicity of choice. -Jane Jacobs
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 12:19 AM
travis bickle travis bickle is offline
silly slackergeek
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 450
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugit View Post
I was listening to the K Street meeting today, and there was a speaker that really caught my attention.

His name was Jim Brennan, he the one that is renovating the Atkins Building at 10th and K in the office condos and ground floor restaurant. He said he has also acquired the Kress Building, 920, 924, 930 K Street (which are the 3 buildings on south-west most corner of 10th and K) and the most intriguing, The Crest Theater.

He said they are going to reposition The Crest into a performing art center.

He's a Juilliard School Grad that has done projects in the Gaslamp, SOMA and was the main driver behind getting Louise Davies for seed money for the Louise Davies Symphony Hall in SF, along with work on the Opera House and Ballet Building in SF.

Seeing The Crest as a performing arts center would be a pretty darn cool thing. One down side though would be I'm not sure they would still show films.
This sounds like the same Jim Brennan that has done a lot of work in San Diego (I see you mentioned Gaslamp). If true, Sacramento should be delighted with what he'll bring to town. His Stingaree (old name for San Diego's Gaslamp) is perhaps the number one club downtown. His group spared no expense. He is an ethical, diligent, and visionary proponent of downtowns and having him on board along K Street is an outstanding sign. I'd be shocked if he wanted to change the Crest in any structural way as he has shown great sensitivity to preservationist's concerns.

He wouldn't know me from Adam, but I'm familiar with some of his work downtown and his reputation. He will be an incredible asset for a K Street renaissance.

This is good news in an otherwise dreary week.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 1:31 AM
ozone's Avatar
ozone ozone is offline
Top Retributor
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Golden Capitol
Posts: 1,719
sugit that's great news. Repositioning the Crest into a performing art center will bring a whole never level to the mall. The Crest might be "multipurpose" already but I've never seen a play there.

wburg I hope you're not going to be my nemesis. It'll be ironic cuz I'm really big on historical preservation. However, I don't see the value in 'living in the past'. I'm convinced that Sacramento had a vibrant downtown in the past. And I pretty much understand what happen. Alas Time marches on and nothing we say or do will turn back the clock. My 98 grandmother used to say to me that the "good old days" were not all that good. There were some 'bad old days" too but people chose not to remember those. There were big slum areas and 'hobo' camps but nobody talks about those.

Inclusionary housing may not be limited strictly to SRO residents but they come under that policy and that's what we were talking about. I'm not saying that SROs should go "somewhere else" but I think the old approach of housing the gov. subsized poor all together in sub-standard facilities is a big mistake and that they should be opened to mixture of lower incomes and the rent-controlled so that guy shlepping lattes will be able to afford a place downtown.

While SRO's elsewhere may not be a detriment to their neighborhood that is certianly not the case in downtown Sacramento. Even in San Diego where the cost of rents is much greater and has been lucky to have enlightened developers is now putting on the brakes on SROs.
__________________
The point of cities is multiplicity of choice. -Jane Jacobs
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 2:24 AM
sugit sugit is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: DT Sacramento
Posts: 3,076
Very good to hear travis ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by travis bickle View Post
I'd be shocked if he wanted to change the Crest in any structural way as he has shown great sensitivity to preservationist's concerns.
I got the same vibe from him as well. He seemed to be someone who enjoys taking great old buildings and turning them in to art centers, I think I even hear him say he has done it in Pennsylvania as well

I'm really interested to hear what he has planned.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 5:59 AM
wburg's Avatar
wburg wburg is offline
Hindrance to Development
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,072
ozone: It's not about living in the past--I've studied too much of it to romanticize about the "good old days" but making use of the existing built environment, and recognizing the value of existing building stock. Right now, with current prices for materials and labor, it is impossible to build housing for people in those income ranges without government subsidy. The advantage of currently existing buildings is that they can be cheaper, because they're already built. (Jane Jacobs' chapter on old buildings in Death and Life... addresses this--it also applies to things like local businesses and cultural uses like small theaters and used bookstores.) I don't want to live in the past--but I do want to learn from it. A lot of ideas we now consider "cutting-edge" like mixed-use buildings, transit-oriented development and walkable neighborhoods are just revisiting the way we used to build cities before the automobile.

With the exception of a couple of places, the existing SRO housing stock is not limited to those with low income. You can march right down to the Berry or the Marshall right now, plunk down your cash, and if they have a vacancy you can get a room. And, believe it or not, not everyone who lives in an SRO is on public assistance. Some of those folks work, they just don't get paid very well.

The problem is that most of the SROs are in miserably bad condition, indifferently maintained, physically dangerous, for the most part not air-conditioned, and generally pretty miserable places to live. Most feature shared bathrooms on each floor, and only a couple have any sort of cooking facilities. The people who live there do so because for the most part they literally can't afford to live anyplace else, or have bad credit histories and can't rent anyplace that does a background check.

In fact, most of the SROs aren't part of Sacramento's inclusionary housing program at all. They're cheap because they are run by slumlords, not because they are government-subsidized (once again, with a couple of exceptions.) Building substitute housing for SRO residents will probably require massive government subsidy, simply because housing is so expensive to build, and you quite literally can't build SRO-style housing (with shared bathrooms, no kitchens, etc.) legally anymore. Retrofitting and repair of the existing buildings, but maintaining the building's purpose, and introducing management slightly less indifferent to the population's well-being would solve many of the SRO hotels' perception problems.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 3:15 PM
innov8's Avatar
innov8 innov8 is offline
Kodachrome
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: livinginurbansac.blogspot
Posts: 4,865
Double Post
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 3:16 PM
innov8's Avatar
innov8 innov8 is offline
Kodachrome
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: livinginurbansac.blogspot
Posts: 4,865
There is now no way Zeiden will wait around for this mess to be clean up now.


Unhappy K Street developer says he's ready for court fight
City is suing to try to force completion of a land swap seen as crucial to the future of troubled downtown area.
By Terri Hardy - Bee Staff Writer
Thursday, May 31, 2007

Moe Mohanna says he is a patient man.

The city is suing Mohanna, a downtown landowner, and his development team to force them to move forward with a land swap that will allow the transformation of K Street's most blighted blocks.

Mohanna isn't happy with the deal and said this week he is willing to battle the city for years in court and spend "up to $3 million" to get justice.

Hanging in the balance: one of downtown's most crucial redevelopment projects in an area Mayor Heather Fargo calls Sacramento's "ground zero."

City officials once had hoped that Joe Zeiden, the developer chosen to renovate the 700 block of K Street with thriving shops, would be finished by the holiday shopping season.

Mohanna is part of a development partnership tasked with bringing condos and retail to the 800 block of K Street. Under the deal, Zeiden would swap properties on the 800 block for Mohanna's properties on the 700 block. That way, Zeiden would control the 700 block of K Street, and Mohanna would control most of the 800 block.

Previously, Mohanna has said that banks have been unwilling to transfer $4 million in loans he has on property in the 700 block to the 800 block. Several buildings in the 800 block were demolished after a fire in November. Mohanna asked for more financial help, but no deal was reached, city officials said.

Mohanna said the effort is in limbo and all negotiations with the city have stopped.

"Now it's two or three years in court, of course," Mohanna said. "After 29 years of waiting and hard work, I'm entitled to the fruits of my labors. I can wait a little more."

John Dangberg, an assistant city manager, said talks with Mohanna's development team are ongoing and positive, including one meeting Wednesday.

Still, Dangberg acknowledged that much relies on a successful outcome. He said Zeiden still is committed, but also is concerned.

"Certainly he is frustrated, but he understands the circumstances we are in," Dangberg said. "When we come out of this whole process, I hope he will be there to partner with us."

The growing rancor between Mohanna and the city, along with a downtown business group, has only been exacerbated by the city's controversial push to move a light-rail station from the 700 block of K Street around the corner to Seventh Street, between J and K streets. Mohanna has been one of the chief critics of the action, claiming it is unnecessary.

Mohanna said the city made the proposal to appease retailer Zeiden, who owns the Z Gallerie furniture retail chain.

"The city needs to treat both developers the same -- one is no better than the other," Mohanna said Tuesday, after a City Council meeting. "I've been here for 30 years and the other (Zeiden) is a newcomer."

Zeiden supported the station move. In a May 22 letter to Fargo, Zeiden said "relocation is crucial to my ability to tenant the 700 block of K Street with high-end destination retail."

Zeiden said the station platform blocks the view line down K Street, including his buildings.

At Tuesday's council meeting, Fargo said that station relocation, along with other planned beautification projects for K Street, was approved to spur economic development in the area. Although a beautification plan will be designed for the entire K Street Mall, there's only enough money to make improvements on the 700 block.

"This is not about helping or harming one developer or another," Fargo said.

City officials said the relocation of the light-rail station would open up St. Rose of Lima, allowing patio seating and public events, as well as eliminating blight and increasing safety. They said that area has a problem with people loitering, particularly transients.

Because the area is a public gathering spot, city officials said, it's nearly impossible for police to cite anyone for loitering. Moving the station to Seventh Street, between K and L streets, will allow better police monitoring, said police Capt. Darrell Fong.

Fong and city leaders also dismissed concerns raised by the plan's critics that it would be problematic for the station to be closer to the Greyhound bus station and across the street from a liquor store, saying that both the station and the store eventually would be moved.

RT executive Beverly Scott said the new station location would allow RT to add a stop for outgoing riders on the Gold Line. Scott told the council that despite some rumors, it was a decision made willingly by her agency.

"RT is not being pressured," she said.

Transit rider groups and other critics spoke against the station move Tuesday, calling it a waste of taxpayer money.

Mohanna, a board member of the Downtown Sacramento Partnership, was upset by the organization's support of the light-rail move.

He hired an attorney, accused the organization of violating the state's open meeting laws when its executive board voted to support the station relocation, and asked it to change its position, said Michael Ault, executive director of the partnership.

Ault said the group followed all laws and provided information requested by Mohanna, but didn't change its position.

"We had to retain legal counsel to deal with this. It's very unfortunate," Ault said.

Ault said of even more concern is the lack of progress on the 700 and 800 blocks of K Street. Redevelopment of that area is pivotal to downtown revitalization, he said.

"We need success there, no question," Ault said. "Stalling, delaying and lengthy litigation means a big loss for this community."

http://www.sacbee.com/101/story/200390.html



dugsboat at 4:13 AM PST Thursday, May 31, 2007 wrote:

Downtown "revitalization"

Over 30 yrs ago Mo came to town and I was one of his bankers. This is a man that is a sraightshooter and honest. Unfortunately he has placed alll his nuts in one basket, and it looks the city is willing to bust his nuts. The city is being silly as every delay is just costing more and more development money. Settle with Mo and get on with the project. I have worked in downtown Sacramento for years as a banker and a stockbroker. It is a city that rolls up its sidewalks at night. Putting more citizens with higher incomes in the area is exactly the cure.

7 out of 9 people found this comment helpful.
Was this comment helpful? Yes | No


PatThePI at 7:12 AM PST Thursday, May 31, 2007 wrote:

Thank you, Dougsboat

When I read these stories of "A" vs "B", and there is no background on either of them, it's hard to get a feeling for what the correct outcome should be. I find it helpful if folks with personal knowledge, step up and add their observations and opinions. It kinda helps to know who to root for, if you know what I mean. This problem on K St has plagued our city for long enough. I would like to see both blocks improved and it would not bother me in the least if the two primary landowners became fabulously wealthy from the process. Their success would only reflect the improvement to life and business in downtown Sacramento. In my opinion, the City is difficult to do business with and that is one reason I moved my business out of the city and into the county. Good luck to all, in this effort.

3 out of 3 people found this comment helpful.
Was this comment helpful? Yes | No


jlspencer at 7:26 AM PST Thursday, May 31, 2007 wrote:

Root for Mo

Like dugsboat, I have met with Mo and he is a good, honest businessman. But let's look at the picture here. A person wants to swap a block of existing, leaseable buildings with a block of burned down and unsafe, shuttered buildings. Just on the surface, this is not a fair trade.

If they want to consider getting rid of blight on K Street, the City better look down the street more than just the 700 and 800 blocks. It goes all the way to 12th Street. Shifting the transients and hooligans one or two blocks down will not get rid of the blight.

3 out of 4 people found this comment helpful.
Was this comment helpful? Yes | No


stevor at 7:29 AM PST Thursday, May 31, 2007 wrote:

Contributions rule?

I have to wonder if who Fargo is giving preferential treatment to is also the one who donated the most to the city council peoples' reelection.

0 out of 1 people found this comment helpful.
Was this comment helpful? Yes | No


williaminsd at 7:39 AM PST Thursday, May 31, 2007 wrote:

Well dugsboat...

In the 30 years Mo has owned that section of K Street it has become among the most blighted, disgusting properties in all of downtown. He has had numerous opportunities to redevelop his prime real estate and, for a variety of reasons - some pretty dubious - he has chosen to remain what some might call a slum lord.

Who is holding whom hostage here? The city hasn't been perfect, but Mo has been a difficult to say the least. And judging by this article, being difficult is hard habit for him to break.

So here we are in 2007 with a real opportunity , some might say the best opportunity - at last - to make K Street a truly regional destination with the kind of retail everyone has dreamed of and what's hold us up? Just one person: Your "straight shooter," Moe Mohanna.

So while Moe throws his latest tantrum, his part of K Street remains a scar on Sacramento. Nice work!

5 out of 5 people found this comment helpful.
Was this comment helpful? Yes | No
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 3:31 PM
wburg's Avatar
wburg wburg is offline
Hindrance to Development
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 2,072
Mohanna wants to build big skyscrapers, and is perfectly willing to let his properties decay and fall into ruin for as long as it takes for that to happen--even if they are buildings that could still be utilized just by opening the doors and making some repairs. Zeiden sees the worth in the historic buildings (if not in their previous tenants) but to Mohanna they're just useless piles of brick.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 4:11 PM
innov8's Avatar
innov8 innov8 is offline
Kodachrome
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: livinginurbansac.blogspot
Posts: 4,865
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Mohanna wants to build big skyscrapers, and isperfectly willing to let his properties decay and fall into ruin for as long as ittakes for that to happen--even if they are buildings that could still beutilized just by opening the doors and making some repairs. Zeiden sees theworth in the historic buildings (if not in their previous tenants) but toMohanna they're just useless piles of brick.
No... the problem is that Mo doe's not want to build anything, or at lease
follow thru on building anything. I believe Mo should get extra compensation
in the trade of the two blocks on K Street. When the land swap was
happening both blocks had buildings on them that could be used and rented,
now the 800 block has no buildings to rent because of the fire so no income
can come in on a monthly basis. The 700 block is still funtional
even in all it's decay.

With any luck, all this will be sorted out right after the next building boom
peaks in Sacramento and K Street will miss the boat again
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted May 31, 2007, 4:21 PM
sugit sugit is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: DT Sacramento
Posts: 3,076
Mo is and forever will be a slumlord. While the city hasn't done itself any favors by not acting tougher sooner, he is still the biggest factors as to why K Street has become how it has.

The only thing he wants is his big payday. He will never actually build anything. While I don't know actually what he wants, I just assume the city give him the 4M (if that is what he wants) and get moving. Problem is, once that happens, then you have to deal with him on the 800 block.

I still think he had something to do with those buildings burning down. Too damn convienent those building burnt down just as he was supposed to transfer them per the signed agreement.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
   
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Sacramento Area
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 6:54 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.