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  #41  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 5:10 AM
econgrad econgrad is offline
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Some expect demand for private, career colleges to swell
State budget cuts due to faltering economy will likely decrease enrollment in public universities

Sacramento Business Journal - by Kelly Johnson Staff Writer
Dennis McCoy | Sacramento Business Journal
Western Career College president Jeff Akens visits the school’s nursing simulation lab in 2007.
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When economic times get tough, people head to college.

Jeff Akens, president of Western Career College, is still waiting for enrollment to spike. "We're not seeing it yet," said the head of the eight-campus private college system based in Sacramento.

But demand for this region's private and career colleges will swell, said Akens and other executives of local colleges. They all stand to benefit from a coupling of economic events: a possible recession and the state's $16 billion budget deficit resulting in cuts to public universities and community colleges just when more people want to enroll. Many will turn instead to private institutions.

Some schools are growing, but some administrators attribute increased enrollment so far to other factors, such as their own ramped-up marketing efforts.

The Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities has found that its member schools grew enrollment in the last two recessions, but there was a short lag. Enrollment "generally dipped slightly during the first year of each recession, followed by increases during the second year of the recession or the year after the recession," research associate Kathaleen Reed said.

There's a lag because of the initial uncertainty at public colleges. Once people realize there are fewer slots available at public institutions, they try the independents.

A tightening in the student-loan market -- following the overall credit crunch -- could, however, cloud how private colleges fare in the downturn. Without loans or with higher loan fees, some students may not be able to further their education.
Good times in bad times

Private colleges and universities with local operations said they're well-equipped to handle more students. They're nimble, can respond quickly and are used to adjusting their capacity. They'll primarily respond by offering more sessions of a course. In some cases, they also might offer online courses, new programs and larger classes.

During economic downturns, higher education lures people who have been laid off or fear they might be downsized. They want to make themselves more marketable by gaining a new skill, finishing a degree or earning an advanced degree. Some want to switch careers to an industry that's more likely to hire. If they can't find a job upon getting their bachelor's degree, they might continue on with their graduate degree.

It won't be as easy to turn to public institutions. Last month, when the deficit was still pegged at $14.5 billion, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger proposed $1.13 billion in cuts to higher education, including $524.5 million to community colleges, $331.9 million to the University of California system and $312.9 million to the California State University system. Colleges likely will respond by raising tuition, increasing class size and eliminating classes.

Most administrators were reluctant to estimate by what degree enrollment might increase. Golden Gate University, which enrolls 155 students in Roseville and 3,700 systemwide, might grow enrollment by 2 percent to 3 percent this fall, university president Dan Angel said. "Not gigantic," he added.

The Art Institute of California-Sacramento is growing as a new campus -- it opened last October and anticipates growing by 75 percent this year -- so it would be hard to isolate that growth from any economic effect, campus president Roger Gomez said.

MTI College in Sacramento is also beefing up enrollment. "We have noticed an increase. I can't say it's because of the downturn in the economy," said Ed Hardenbrook, vice president of operations of MTI. Instead, the boost is likely from new programs, including a new phlebotomy program and its Paul Mitchell cosmetology program.

WyoTech, an auto tech school in West Sacramento, expects steady growth with or without a recession, said Andy Vignone, vice president of operations for WyoTech's parent company Corinthian Colleges Inc. Students enroll because they have a passion for the work, he said, not because they're reacting to the economy.

The Career College Association had no data on enrollments during past recessions. "Our sector doesn't study itself very much," association president Harris Miller said.

Western Career College, for one, has found certain programs grow during recessions. Following the recession induced by the dot-com crash early this decade, Western Career College's medical assisting program in Sacramento saw enrollment grow by 50 percent between 2002 and 2004. Then from 2004 to 2007, as the economy rebounded, the program shrunk by 25 percent. Western's dental assisting program in Sacramento, another counter-cyclical program, experienced similar results.

Over at MTI, "In some downturns we've seen increases. Other times we haven't," Hardenbrook said. "It just depends on the training (students) want."

The general belief is that career colleges thrive in recessions. As unemployment rises, people return to school. That thinking, Miller said, is over-simplified. Yes, career colleges grow enrollment during economic downturns. But they also grow during times of low unemployment, as the last four years have demonstrated.

"The sector has grown dramatically both in good times and bad times," Miller said.

That partly explains why some private colleges with local operations said they don't need to prepare or do anything differently. They're used to scaling up or down based on demand. They track monthly unemployment figures. They're constantly reassessing and trying to anticipate student demand. They're also used to higher education funding crises in the Golden State.

"It's not a matter of doing anything differently," said Jo Hoffmeier, Northern California and Oregon territorial vice president of University of Phoenix. The university, which has four local campuses, is ready to respond to any increase in enrollment.
More classes, not bigger classes

Heald College, which serves about 1,200 students at its campuses in Rancho Cordova and Roseville, has grown enrollment systemwide of late, president Nolan Miura said, but he wouldn't say by how much. He attributed the growth so far to Heald's increased spending on advertising and other investments in the college.

"Right now we are planning for growth," he said.

Private colleges with local operations said they're nimble and could respond to increased enrollment within two or three months.

To serve more students, Heald would open up more sections of existing courses, Miura said. The college also could increase the course load of instructors in the short term and gradually hire more faculty.

Many administrators said they wouldn't increase class size. Their model is based on small classes with personalized attention.

Some would consider developing new programs, if warranted, but regulatory hurdles can make that difficult or time consuming. Besides, no school wants to make a major investment for what might be a short-term economic downturn, Miller said.

Private colleges also will respond to increased enrollment with online classes.

In January Heald College began offering online classes to existing students. Students, especially those with jobs and family obligations, need flexibility. Eventually, the college anticipates offering online classes -- even entire degrees -- to new students, Miura said.

Golden Gate University has offered a cyber program for a decade, but "we'll hit harder now," Angel said.
Attracting unskilled workers

Certain programs are more attractive in a down economy than others, but not everyone agrees which programs benefit.

Western Career College's nursing and dental hygiene programs are always full, regardless of the economy. The college's dental assisting, medical assisting, pharmacy technology and massage therapy programs are more likely to grow during a weak economy. That's because they attract more unskilled workers -- who often are the first to be laid off when the economy tumbles.

Golden Gate's Angel figures the university's business school will pick up additional students in a down economy. The law school, on the other hand, won't, he said. Earning a law degree requires a long commitment, and isn't something that people suddenly decide to do.

Miller said rising unemployment rates usually benefit colleges that offer programs requiring less than two years and that train for blue-collar, gray-collar or service worker jobs, including heating/air conditioning and auto repair.

For its member schools, the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities, on the other hand, found that enrollments in graduate programs and professional schools such as dental and law schools actually benefit more from recessions than do enrollments in undergraduate programs.
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  #42  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 5:11 AM
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There are two separate Articles, one of them is on page2
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  #43  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 3:24 PM
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Public institutions still a bargain in California

The Community colleges and the State university system are far and beyond still a bargain compared to the rest of the nation.

Minimum wage was 2.65 when I went to a public institution in another state and my college tuition was about 2100 dollars for the year in 1983

Today minimum wage is what 9.00? and the tuition is what 3600 at Sac st? or is that even high?
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  #44  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2008, 6:39 PM
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Less than that...I think it's around $1000 a semester for undergrads. That's why the public schools fill up first: they are profoundly more affordable than private colleges. Private schools get the overflow.

I note that most of the colleges mentioned in the article are vocational colleges--auto mechanics, medical training, etcetera, and specialty postgraduate schools (law school, counseling, etc) rather than full-fledged universities. Those are certainly needed, but I'm still hoping for more traditional colleges in the region.

While I'm sure someone will comment about those kinds of schools as hotbeds of liberal humanism and useless underwater basket weaving majors, they're important for other reasons. A respected university gives a city prestige, and the "college town" atmosphere that comes with a university simply doesn't happen at vocational colleges.
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  #45  
Old Posted Mar 2, 2008, 12:57 AM
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Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Less than that...I think it's around $1000 a semester for undergrads. That's why the public schools fill up first: they are profoundly more affordable than private colleges. Private schools get the overflow.

I note that most of the colleges mentioned in the article are vocational colleges--auto mechanics, medical training, etcetera, and specialty postgraduate schools (law school, counseling, etc) rather than full-fledged universities. Those are certainly needed, but I'm still hoping for more traditional colleges in the region.

While I'm sure someone will comment about those kinds of schools as hotbeds of liberal humanism and useless underwater basket weaving majors, they're important for other reasons. A respected university gives a city prestige, and the "college town" atmosphere that comes with a university simply doesn't happen at vocational colleges.
I agree with everything you have said, except one: That Private Schools get the overflow. Private schools are usually the first choice of most college bound students because of their "prestige". Here is a quote from one of the following articles:

Demand for private universities has surged even as student interest in public institutions has fallen, and is expected to jump higher this year as private fee-paying students become eligible for government loans.

And here is some articles backing up my statement:

http://www.smh.com.au/news/National/...832243859.html

http://cshe.berkeley.edu/publication...rt.Nov2007.pdf

http://repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/vi...9&context=cshe

IMHO: Bring more and more public and private higher education institutions to the area. Sacramento needs this. Yes, I am talking about the liberal Education Wburg is talking about (which has nothing to do with liberal politics...).
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  #46  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2008, 7:05 PM
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University Of Sacramento Extension Courses In Chico, California

UNIVERSITY OF SACRAMENTO
ANNOUNCES
EXTENSION COURSES IN CHICO, CALIFORNIA



The University of Sacramento is proud to announce the formation of an extension course of its College of Education in Chico, California.

Instructors include: Fr. Blaise Berg, STD; Deacon Ray Helgeson, MA; and Joseph Hollcraft, MA.

Classes are located at Newman Center in Chico.

After beginning classes last September, the classes will be offered again in the fall, 2008 semester. Outreach again covers Chico, but will also include the surrounding communities of Oroville, Paradise, Orland and Corning.

Other courses are also being considered for the spring, 2009.

These extension courses are a product of the University’s long-range plan to reach as many students as possible in the Northern California Region.

With ground breaking for the undergraduate campus aimed at 2010, the University is pursuing outreach programs that will provide needed certificates and degrees in a meaningful and convenient manner.

For further information, please call the University at 916-443-4760
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  #47  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2008, 1:08 AM
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I hadn't even heard of "UC Sacramento"?


UC Sacramento Center gains permanent status
by David Goll East Bay Business Times

The University of California's Sacramento Center, a pilot academic program, will be upgraded to permanent status next month.

Founded in late 2003, the UC Center Sacramento offers classes focused on state public policy issues that have been available to students from all 10 UC campuses. To date, 420 students have participated in public-policy research and analysis through seminars, research papers and internships. The center also houses an internship program for public affairs journalism.

"The pilot program has been a great success, and we are very excited about the Sacramento Center becoming permanent as it will only enhance learning opportunities for students and UC's contributions to the state," Wyatt R. (Rory) Hume, a university provost, said in a statement.

Hume will join Gary Dymski, the center's director, along with state officials, alumni and current students at an event celebrating the center's new status from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. May 6 at UC Center Sacramento, 1130 K St., Suite LL 22.

Along with the classes for students, the center has held seminars and panel discussions for UC faculty and others on such issues as international trade, the economics of global warming, wildfire containment and prevention, state revenue and the new economy, affordable housing, environmental justice, and many other issues facing the state.

The center's journalism program -- a joint effort of the Committee of Concerned Journalists, New America Media and the UC-Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism -- focuses on improving reporting in the media on the issues of education, health care and the environment.
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  #48  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2008, 1:37 AM
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I've never heard of that either.

CADA working with the UC system to build housing @ P and 12/13th for students. I wonder if the housing is for this program....

Last edited by sugit; Apr 30, 2008 at 5:22 AM.
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  #49  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2008, 5:21 AM
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Not exactly a UC Sacramento, but a satellite campus where students from various schools in the UC system (primarily UCLA and Berkeley) can come to study public policy in California's government center. Apparently it is modeled after USC's public policy administration program--USC's satellite campus is located on I and 18th across from Ace Hardware. They offer a Master's in Public Administration program, all the classes can be taken right there although students can also truck down to USC's campus and take classes there.
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  #50  
Old Posted Apr 30, 2008, 9:34 PM
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  #51  
Old Posted May 15, 2008, 10:24 PM
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Sacramento County board revives plan for housing, college campus
By Ed Fletcher - efletcher@sacbee.com

Published 12:00 am PDT Thursday, May 15, 2008

Sacramento County supervisors, on a 4-1 vote Wednesday, gave new life to a controversial plan to build a four-year college and housing on more than 2,000 acres of undeveloped land east of Rancho Cordova.

The vote on the Cordova Hills project overturned an earlier planning department decision. Planners had asked the supervisors to uphold their rejection of the project based on its location outside the urban policy area.

Despite the supervisors' vote, developers are a long way from turning thousands of rolling acres of eastern Sacramento County into housing and the new home of the University of Sacramento, run by the Legionaries of Christ.

"All that we did today is allow an application to be filed," said Paul Hahn, who heads the county's municipal service agency.

The project faces further hurdles once specific building plans and environmental studies are completed.

Nonetheless, local environmentalists considered Wednesday's action significant.

"The land for which Cordova Hills has been proposed is at the heart of the remaining irreplaceable vernal pools and grasslands within Sac County," the Environmental Council of Sacramento wrote to supporters. "This area contains numerous threatened and endangered species."

A majority of the supervisors, however, decided that the prospect of a University of Sacramento would be too great an asset to rule out at this stage.

They voted to accept the application calling for a change to the general plan. Supervisor Roger Dickinson voted to reject the application.

The project site – east of Rancho Cordova's city limits and north of Jackson Road – is within the county's urban services boundary. But it is outside the area slated for urban development in the near future.

The project would include a 7,000-student campus and 1,000- plus acres of housing. It calls for several hundred acres of mixed-use development and retail outlets. The property's primary owner is Conway LLC., and the development is being led by Ron Alvarado.

The Legionaries of Christ have been holding college classes in a downtown office building since January 2005. Sacramento County officials had tried to get the school to relocate to Mather Field. But the school announced last year that it preferred the Cordova Hills site.

Supervisor Roberta MacGlashan said Wednesday's decision just clears the way for more planning.

"The Cordova Hills proposal offers a unique opportunity to bring another four-year university to the Sacramento region," MacGlashan wrote in an e-mail to The Bee.

"The Board's action today just allows them to make an application, which must still go through a rigorous land-use planning process, environmental review and public hearings."

But Dickinson said the project shouldn't jump ahead of other potential growth sites just because the developers promise to include a college.

"Allowing this proposal to move ahead at this time completely undercuts the general plan update process," Dickinson said.

"It would allow a potentially major expansion of the urban area, far beyond the requirements of the university, which is cited as the justification."
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  #52  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2008, 11:09 AM
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Sacramento Bee, by Bob Shallit
Quote:
Breathing fire: Looking to open a campus in Placer County, Philadelphia's Drexel University has sent its president out here on visits. Ditto for some of the university's board members.

Now add Mario the Dragon to the list of visiting dignitaries.

The school's blue-and-gold mascot – who stands about 6-foot-4, not including his tail – made a local appearance Tuesday, in connection with the launch of US Airways' first nonstop flights between Sacramento and Philly.
General Facts
• Drexel University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational university founded in 1891 by financier and philanthropist Anthony J. Drexel.
• Member of the NCAA Division I, Colonial Athletic Association
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  #53  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2008, 12:19 AM
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Folsom Lake College offers new classes

Folsom Lake College offers new classes
By Walter Yost - wyost@sacbee.com
Published 12:00 am PDT Thursday, August 7, 2008

One of the advantages of attending a growing school like Folsom Lake Community College is the wealth of new classes offered each semester.

This fall, that includes courses as varied as cartooning, dance, viticulture and public management.

Many of the new courses are considered experimental offerings, college spokesman Scott Crow said.

Instructors can try out a new class before it becomes permanent and see if students like it, he explained.

One new course that appears to have passed that test is cartooning. Crow said last week that the three-unit art class is already full.

In preparation for the fall semester, which starts Aug. 23, a list of all classes is available on the college's Web site at www.losrios.edu/flc/fall.

Classes will be held at the main campus in Folsom, the El Dorado Center in Placerville, the Rancho Cordova Center and community locations.

Other new class offerings this semester include two courses in public management – "Introduction to Public Management," taught by Omid Ghamami and "Introduction to Public Financial Administration," taught by Candy Smith.

Ghamami, an adjunct professor of business and an Intel business operations manager, said the classes are part of a new certificate program at the college, the only one available in the Los Rios Community College District.

"They're for anyone working for or with government and nonprofit entities," Ghamami said of the three-unit evening classes.

Also this semester, Debi Davis Worth will be teaching "Dance Composition & Production: How to Choreograph," and "Dance Composition & Production: Art of Creating Dance."

Worth, a professor of dance, said the experimental courses are part of an associate of arts degree in dance studies being developed at the college. The degree program will be the only one of its kind in the district.

"There's a lot of interest among students. El Dorado County and the Sacramento region have a lot of artistically motivated kids," she said.

Worth, who is also director of the El Dorado Dance Academy, said the classes fulfill the college's one-unit physical education requirement

Students enrolling in any of the fall classes can register online at www.flc.losrios.edu or in person at the Folsom Lake College admissions and records office on the main campus, 10 College Parkway; the El Dorado Center at 6699 Campus Drive, Placerville; or the Rancho Cordova Center at 10378 Rockingham Drive.
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  #54  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2008, 10:17 AM
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CSUS expects steady enrollment, Gonzalez says

CSUS expects steady enrollment, Gonzalez says
By Bill Lindelof - blindelof@sacbee.com
Published 12:00 am PDT Friday, August 29, 2008

Despite a shortened enrollment period – designed to save money by decreasing students – Sacramento State is expecting the same number of students as last year, President Alexander Gonzalez said Thursday.

Enrollment is "pretty much right on target," he told 675 faculty, staff and students during his annual fall address.

The CSU system announced in January that it would shorten the application period for high school seniors and other first-time freshmen by about six months – from mid-August to Feb. 1 in anticipation of cuts in higher education funding.

California State University, Sacramento, and six other under-enrolled campuses had an extra month to accept applications – until March 1.

The university's enrollment last fall was 28,845. Final enrollment figures for this year won't be available until after classes begin on Tuesday.

During his Thursday address, Gonzalez updated staff on several campus building projects.

Worried about attracting and holding onto talented faculty and staff members in a pricey real estate market, Sacramento State announced plans in 2005 to build affordable housing for professors and university employees.

The university purchased 25 acres near the campus for a "university village" that could offer up to 500 housing units.

Gonzalez said the project is in the demolition stage, but because of a faltering economy, development has slowed considerably.

Work began this summer on a student Recreation and Wellness Center that's set to open in 2010.

And a tram system that will run through campus and out to the 65th Street light-rail station is on schedule.

Such developments are part of increased collaboration between the university and the city of Sacramento. As a commitment to furthering that collaboration – particularly on planning and growth – Gonzales signed a memorandum of understanding Thursday with several city officials.

For too long, Mayor Heather Fargo said, there has been too much of a separation between the city and the campus.

"This is an unprecedented, strategic collaboration that will transform the City and the University," Gonzalez said in a statement issued before the signing. "In these challenging economic times, we've created a way to pull our resources together and utilize the University's faculty expertise, student intellect and energy to serve the City."
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  #55  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2008, 9:13 PM
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Gonzalez states that Sacramento State is expecting the same number of students as last year. However, American River College is expecting almost 40,000 students this fall. Up almost a few thousand from last semester.
Anyways, the following is something to vote for or against come November.

Los Rios college district puts bond measure on November ballot
By Bill Lindelof - blindelof@sacbee.com
Published 12:00 am PDT Tuesday, August 12, 2008
Story appeared in OUR REGION section, Page B3



Between a rock and hard times, the Los Rios Community College District has placed a $475 million bond measure on the November ballot.

"Enrollment is growing far faster than any of us could have imagined it would," said Brice Harris, chancellor of the Los Rios system.

Faced with rocketing growth, the community college district – which spans Sacramento, Yolo and El Dorado counties, as well as parts of Placer – is asking taxpayers for money to build and remodel campus buildings.


The question is whether voters, facing an uncertain job market and rising prices for food, gas and other staples, will be receptive to the proposal, called Measure M. The measure requires a 55 percent approval rate for passage. If approved, it requires property owners in the district to pay $9.10 per $100,000 of assessed valuation.

Earlier this year, San Juan Unified School District officials decided not to pursue a bond measure, citing the rough economic conditions.

A recently released report added to the gloomy outlook: The Sacramento Regional Research Institute said job losses in the region quickened in June, resulting in a steeper decline than the state and national average.

Harris said Monday that Los Rios leaders understand times are tough. In fact, pocketbook issues are a prime reason community college enrollment is up, as young and old seek job training — and retraining.

"We have a commanding need and we would not be doing our job if we did not present this to the voters," said Harris.

This fall, about 88,000 students will enroll in the Los Rios college system, which includes American River, Cosumnes River, Folsom Lake and Sacramento City colleges. That's 4,000 more students than enrolled last fall, a 5 percent rise – and part of a steady increase. Last fall's enrollment was 9 percent higher than fall 2006; and fall 2006 enrollment was up 8 percent over 2005.

Los Rios estimates that one out of every 12 adults in the Sacramento region is enrolled at a community college.

Cost is also a factor in the burgeoning enrollment. The per unit fee at community colleges has remained steady at $20, while California State University and University of California fees have risen.

The Los Rios district last passed a bond measure in 2002, when voters approved a $265 million package. During that bond campaign, Los Rios leaders told voters that they expected 100,000 students by 2015. The state now projects 120,000 by 2016.
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  #56  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2008, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by econgrad View Post
And a tram system that will run through campus and out to the 65th Street light-rail station is on schedule.
they better hurry up, it gets annoying walking a mile with only 9 minutes to get to class from the station, and the crappy times that the buses run to the stop at the front of the school make it just as crappy.
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  #57  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2008, 11:48 PM
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boohoo... why would a devout anti-urbanist be taking a bus anyway? Jump in your hummer yo.
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  #58  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2008, 5:13 AM
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Before I had my bike I would ride my longboard from the 65th st station so it was usually quick, but on rainy days the walk is something you have to account for. I hate the placement of the underpass and the fact you can't get into campus with walking down to the parking garage. I have all my classes in the Amador building (last year of studying planning) and it's kind of a roundabout way of getting there. They really need to put a walkway in between the baseball field and the football and track field. But now I ride my bike from downtown to campus via H st. Oh a little off topic but the underpass on H is now one lane each way with a dedicated bike lane on each side!!!!! (that was the most dangerous part of my ride) They just finished painting the lines today and they repaved each side of the underpass.
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  #59  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2008, 4:51 PM
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I normally take the bus rather than light rail to Sac State, mostly because the transfer from 65th to the buses is not real convenient and the walk over via the Bee Bridge requires that big dog-leg through the parking structure. It's easier to just catch a 30 bus on J Street, at least from downtown.

A campus shuttle would work best as an orbiting shuttle that goes around the whole campus, rather than just connecting the 65th Street station to a nearby point on campus. That way, it would be useful for people getting around campus instead of just being a way to get to and from campus. For a big campus like Sac State it would help for, say, getting from Lassen to the bookstore in a hurry. Using the existing belt road around campus would work, although a shuttle bus would get stuck in traffic during peak periods just like a car. A streetcar or BRT on a dedicated right-of-way wouldn't have that problem.
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Old Posted Sep 4, 2008, 11:09 PM
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boohoo... why would a devout anti-urbanist be taking a bus anyway? Jump in your hummer yo.
I agree with some urbanist things like transit, since I have used it the entire time I have lived in Sacramento. I also used the base transit when I was in the Army, and the local shuttle in Dixon. Shouldn't you be forcing people to use it anyway?

Wburg I live in Greenhaven so its kinda tough to find a direct bus with the correct times. I take 81 though on the way back home, if it's there. Most of the buses just don't have the times I need and make it too inconvenient but I have found a good route. I take the 6 bus thats right outside of my apartment, to the 16th street lightrail and I catch the train to the unv stop. If I get there before 8:30 I can avoid walking and take the 87 bus to the front of the school.
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