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  #101  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2007, 8:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJD View Post
From Metro's Draft 2035 Plan:

-Construct Streetcar from NW Lovejoy to NE Oregon St. $147,000,000
-Construct Streetcar from NE Oregon to SE Water $19,000,000
-Construct Streetcar from NW 23rd via Burnside/Couch to E 14th $118,500,000
-Extend Streetcar from E 14th to Hollywood District $70,000,000

http://www.metro-region.org/library_...35rtpdraft.pdf
$354.5 Million....The summation tallied from above. This is the equivalent of building a new sports stadium. I say, lets build the the Streetcar Lines!
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  #102  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2007, 2:51 PM
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Streetcar plan takes spin

The first of three open houses for a citywide plan for future streetcar lines will be held Monday at Parkrose High School.

The meeting will introduce residents to a 10-month process expected to prepare a Streetcar System Plan. It will take place from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the community room at the school, 12003 N.E. Shaver St.

Among other things, the open houses will display a “Primary Transit Network” map and study showing ridership as well as land development goals compiled by the Portland Office of Transportation.

The other two meetings are Nov. 13 at Lincoln High School and Nov. 15 at Grant High School.

For information, contact Patrick Sweeney, 503-823-5611, or patrick.sweeney@pdxtrans.org.

http://www.portlandtribune.com/news/...09171625092900
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  #103  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2007, 6:33 PM
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Sacramento officials visit to study streetcar system
Portland Business Journal - by Michael Shaw Business Journal News Service

Portland's streetcars have helped fuel redevelopment, but Sacramento area officials who recently visited the city say financing streetcars in their city might be problematic.

Along the Willamette River, three high-rise towers have sprouted in the past year and a fourth is in mid-climb in the South Waterfront.

Portland officials told their Sacramento counterparts that South Waterfront is booming due in no small part to the city's streetcar system, which opened a new loop past the residential towers in August.

Apologies to San Francisco and its quaint cable cars, but Portland is the streetcar king. The system, once derided by TriMet as a "donkey trolley," has become the model for at least 20 other metro areas across the country, including Sacramento and West Sacramento, which are jointly studying a streetcar proposal.

Sacramento officials here want to know whether streetcars will work as well in Sacramento as they have in Portland.

A junket of Sacramento and West Sacramento officials toured Portland two weeks ago via mass transit, using all-day passes to segue easily from the airport light-rail line to the 7.2-mile streetcar loop, hopping on and off at points of interest. They found brownfields that bear striking resemblance to areas of Sacramento but are experiencing radical transformation through redevelopment.

They also noted significant challenges they would face in emulating Portland's success.

Streetcars are credited not with aiding development in downtown Portland, but with creating it -- foot-traffic studies showed an increase from three pedestrians per hour in one section of town to 938, attributable to the system.

"Is it a better connecting alternative to more light rail and how does it really work?" asked David Spaur, Sacramento's economic development director, as he waited to board the next car. "It looks like it works better than light rail for short distances."

Charlie Hales is a former Portland city commissioner in charge of transportation, an architect of the Portland system and now the manager of the Sacramento-West Sacramento project as a vice president for engineering firm HDR Inc.

Hales says Portland's streetcars were launched without a solid plan for funding while facing opposition from Portland's transit agency, which thought they threatened the existing light-rail system.

"It wasn't our only strategy, but it was the keystone of a set of strategies to bring the type of development we wanted," Hales said while showing a group the massive developments -- grocers, bookstores, five-story underground parking complexes -- that have sprouted since the streetcar system opened in 2001. "We didn't know it would work this well."

A key misunderstanding, Hales said, is how differently the streetcars function from light rail. Unlike light rail, the system isn't designed to move commuters in and out of downtown, but to circulate traffic within. The cost is $25 million to $30 million a mile, about half that of light rail, Hales said.

There are tantalizing parallels between Portland and Sacramento that officials say bode well for a streetcar system in the northern California city.

There's the South Waterfront itself, for one, a brownfield site that a few years ago was reminiscent of West Sacramento's "Triangle" district, where developers want to build high-density housing, offices and shops. Then there is the Pearl District.

A decade ago, it was a railyard like the one in downtown Sacramento. Today, it's a vibrant mixed-use neighborhood with restaurants, mid-rise residential buildings and character, whose success is chalked up to the streetcars running through the heart of the district.

The chief hurdle in Sacramento is paying for the proposed first leg, a $50 million, 2.2-mile line from West Sacramento City Hall to the Sacramento Convention Center. There are hopes for an expanded system that would drive redevelopment throughout the metropolitan area.

"That's what's really going to be the thing -- how do you pay for this?" West Sacramento City Councilman Mark Johannessen said.

Portland initially funded its system through increased parking fees, a tax increment finance district and an assessment district covering businesses within the streetcar zone. There's been so much development that assessments now play a much greater role in funding the system, Hales said. Portland also funds its streetcar through advertising.

In Sacramento, a large burden would fall to developers.

Hales dismisses federal funding as a likely initial source, calling it time-consuming and uncertain because transportation funds are generally awarded to light-rail systems that reduce driving miles more than streetcars do.

Financing aside, Portland's success isn't viewed as a guarantee for Sacramento.

Spaur asked: "Are you coming to the right city to compare with Sacramento?"

Michael Shaw is a staff writer with affiliated publication Sacramento Business Journal. Contact portland@bizjournals.com.
http://portland.bizjournals.com/port...ml?t=printable
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...399901&page=22
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  #104  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2007, 2:24 AM
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Lol!

Quote:
once derided by TriMet as a "donkey trolley,"

travel.webshots.com
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  #105  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2007, 3:05 PM
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Clang, clang -- a trolley may be in your future
Portland Streetcar - Planners want to know which neighborhoods will welcome new lines
Monday, October 29, 2007
DYLAN RIVERA
The Oregonian

The next big thing for your neighborhood: How about the Portland Streetcar?

Emboldened by the success of the downtown streetcar line, city leaders want to expand service into a network that would crisscross the city.

Unlike bus service, city planners say, a streetcar could generate business and political momentum for clusters of midrise housing and commercial centers that could spread the walkable feel of popular urban neighborhoods.

About 140 miles of the city's busiest streets show potential for new streetcar routes, said Patrick Sweeney, project manager for the Portland Office of Transportation. Those streets have dense enough housing, employment and shopping -- and are zoned for more.

In the next six months, the transportation office will rank potential routes based on neighborhood and business support. Technical details, such as relatively flat terrain and wide intersections for railcar turns, also will be evaluated.

The toughest nut to crack might be finding a combination of neighborhood support and property ripe for redevelopment that could help raise millions of dollars in private money for each extension.

At three open houses starting today, residents will have a chance to plead for or against a line in their neighborhoods.

"A community that has a corridor and advocates for their own corridor is so important to us," Sweeney said. "If they don't support it, we're not going to pick a fight with a neighborhood."

Streetcars could make more neighborhoods resemble the popular retail corridor along Southeast Belmont, built originally along a streetcar line in the early 20th century. Likely routes could include Northeast Sandy Boulevard, lined now with car dealerships, vacant lots and low-slung buildings.

Streetcar routes could help determine how the city grows and absorbs its share of the 1 million new people expected to move to the metro area by 2040, said city Commissioner Sam Adams, who oversees the transportation office.

"It's a tough but important goal to try to accommodate the next 300,000 Portlanders within a quarter-mile of transit," Adams said. "In doing so, that protects the single-family neighborhoods that we have. If we do it right, it stands to strengthen our main streets and town centers."

At the earliest, a handful of the strongest potential lines might be built from 2010 to 2020, Sweeney said. Much of the money would come from a new federal program known as Small Starts, designed to help pay for streetcars.

Portland's plan might be among the most ambitious in the nation, said Gloria Ohland, a spokeswoman for Reconnecting America, a nonprofit transit group based in Oakland, Calif. "Portland is certainly leading the way in this effort, and other cities are really looking to Portland for guidance."

But many questions remain.

If a streetcar would bring denser development, does it stand a chance in a city where neighborhood associations sometimes criticize even modest proposals for multistory buildings?

If a streetcar depends on financial contributions from developers, are there enough along each route who agree?

Initial indications say yes.

The City Council has given preliminary approval to a new line along Burnside and Couch streets downtown. Planners have tentatively placed a spur from East Burnside up Northeast Sandy to the Hollywood neighborhood on a regional transportation plan. That's a first step in seeking federal money.

Dozens of neighborhoods from all corners of Portland expressed desire for a streetcar line at an open house last summer, Adams said.

The Sullivan's Gulch neighborhood of Northeast Portland strongly supports an extension from the Lloyd District east along Northeast Broadway, said Peyton Snead, neighborhood association co-chairman. The streetcar could take traffic off Broadway, make pedestrian crossings safer and bring other amenities, he said.

Others are more skeptical.

Developer Joe Weston, who said his large piece of the Pearl District benefited greatly from the city's first streetcar line, questions whether eastside lines will prompt much redevelopment and business investment.

Weston, who owns about 20 blocks along Northeast Sandy, said the city should wait for the extension along Martin Luther King Boulevard and Grand Avenue to open in about four years to see whether investment follows.

But streetcars have become so popular that the city needs the plan it's about to embark on, said John Fregonese, a regional planner whose firm lost a bid to create the streetcar plan. "A plan allows you to examine these things in a logical way, and you can decide not to do it and you've only spent enough money for the plan."

Dylan Rivera: 503-221-8532; dylanrivera@news.oregonian.com For environment news, go to http://blog.oregonlive.com/pdxgreen
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/orego...580.xml&coll=7
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  #106  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2007, 3:51 AM
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I think a line going up Lombard to St. Johns and back possibly starting and terminating at interstate would be useful. A line down Powell would also be great.
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  #107  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2007, 3:53 AM
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They had a pretty comprehensive map of the possible routes on the oregonlive website today. I doubt all of them could be built but even a few would be nice.
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  #108  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2007, 3:35 PM
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  #109  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2007, 5:33 PM
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^^^Thank you njd
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  #110  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2007, 11:12 PM
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That looks suspiciously like a map of current bus routes - the frequent services routes (or some of them) specifically. And it does not include the current streetcar line nor the planned route along the eastbank.
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  #111  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2007, 3:24 PM
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Quote:
That looks suspiciously like a map of current bus routes - the frequent services routes (or some of them) specifically. And it does not include the current streetcar line nor the planned route along the eastbank.
and looks surprisingly similar to the 1912 streetcar map minus the fact that Swan Island is an island and the Guild Lake area is a lake...
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  #112  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2007, 5:05 AM
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I found this map on PDOT's website (see this link for the Streetcar System Plan - the map is under "Draft Primary Transit Index Exhibit").



I think that's probably where the Oregonian got the map shown in NJD's post above. This one doesn't say that these are potential streetcar routes, but just that they (the red lines) are "1st Level PTI." PTI = Primary Transit Index, which apparently is just a high demand transit corridor. Some of these could end up with streetcar lines, but I doubt the city is anticipating all of them. But we probably knew that. Sorry if this map or the link has been posted before.
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  #113  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2007, 5:49 PM
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From the Oregonian...
Quote:
Study of Lake Oswego rail link OK'd
Options - The effects of a streetcar or enhanced bus service will be examined
Friday, December 14, 2007
YUXING ZHENG
The Oregonian

Though years away, a streetcar linking South Waterfront to Lake Oswego took another step closer to reality Thursday when Metro councilors approved an environmental impact study.

The study will examine the effects of two transportation options: a streetcar ending at Johns Landing or Lake Oswego or enhanced bus service along Southwest Macadam Avenue and Oregon 43.

The move eliminates the bus rapid transit option creating bus-only lanes at about eight intersections between Portland and Lake Oswego, which drew limited interest in study groups and low ridership estimates.

"This is a quality project," said Councilor Carlotta Collette, who supports a streetcar extension to Lake Oswego, which sits in her district. "It'll be an important link in the regional system."

The study would begin in January 2009 and take 12 to 18 months to complete, said Karen Withrow, a Metro spokeswoman. A combination of federal grants and money from local governments would pay for the $5.5 million study.

Ten officials and residents testified Thursday in support of a streetcar, though they disagreed if it should end in Johns Landing or Lake Oswego.
Roger Martin, executive director of the Oregon Transit Association and a Lake Oswego resident, said a streetcar to Lake Oswego would best meet regional need despite opposition from property owners in Dunthorpe and Johns Landing.

"They have no desire to solve transportation problems in Lake Oswego or West Linn," he said.

A streetcar would extend from its current end in South Waterfront to three possible sites: temporarily or permanently at Nevada Street in Johns Landing, or in Lake Oswego at either the Albertsons on State Street or the Safeway on Boones Ferry Road. If the streetcar ends in Johns Landing, TriMet would probably offer expanded bus service connecting to Lake Oswego.

"We want to connect Portland and Lake Oswego without having to force people to transfer," said Dave Unsworth, TriMet's project development manager. "I think we're supportive of looking at this. Generally, we think it should go further south."

If the streetcar extends to Lake Oswego, it would run along Macadam Avenue or the Willamette Shore Trolley line, which is in public ownership.
The Willamette right of way is valued at $75 million and could be used to leverage up to $112.5 million in federal money.

The enhanced bus service option would mean more frequent service, and the addition of bus shelters, benches and lighting along stops on Oregon 43. But because enhanced bus service would not use the right of way, it would not qualify for federal funds.

Constructing the streetcar extension could cost between $200 million and $216 million with annual maintenance of $2.2 million, according to estimates from Metro. Those figures include the cost of a pedestrian and bicycle path that officials and residents have strongly supported. Construction on a streetcar would begin in 2013 at the earliest.

A steering committee in September recommended the streetcar as the preferred option for further study. The streetcar is estimated to have the highest ridership of all the alternatives by 2025 and the shortest travel time -- 24 minutes from Lake Oswego to Portland, compared to 42 minutes with bus rapid transit.

Lake Oswego Mayor Judie Hammerstad, said Metro is wasting time and money to study anything other than a streetcar to Lake Oswego. Buses along Oregon 43 will not meet ridership numbers, take advantage of federal funds or fulfill the goal of providing a high-capacity route linking Lake Oswego to Portland, she said.

"The need is to take the congestion off 43," she said. "It will be a parking lot in 2025."
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/orego...100.xml&coll=7
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  #114  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2007, 6:03 PM
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I have a serious inquiry, here:

Does anyone have enough access to Sam Adams to ask him why in all the world Sandy is a higher priority route for the streetcar to him than Hawthorne?

Is it because it would be easier to extend the east loop? Or what is it? I'm a bit miffed over this whole thing, and I have been since he started talking it up last year.
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  #115  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2007, 6:25 PM
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^probably has to do something with the fact that a large developer has bought a ton of property in the lower Sandy area and Sam can squeeze him for necessary property levy to get the line built. Lower Sandy can build more dense housing than Hawthorne, the prime Hollywood district also can get higher densities through the neighborhood association than anything on Hawthorne.
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  #116  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2007, 6:34 PM
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Originally Posted by MarkDaMan View Post
^probably has to do something with the fact that a large developer has bought a ton of property in the lower Sandy area and Sam can squeeze him for necessary property levy to get the line built. Lower Sandy can build more dense housing than Hawthorne, the prime Hollywood district also can get higher densities through the neighborhood association than anything on Hawthorne.
Ah, funding before convenience.

A hawthorne streetcar would be incredibly successful, no doubt, but from what you said I figure we should see the viability of putting the streetcar through older pre-developed areas before going into the fickle hawthorne area.
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  #117  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2007, 8:38 PM
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The only way Hawthorne is getting a streetcar, in the current society, is to develop Foster to Lents at the same time because Hawthorne is pretty well developed and high priced (I should know, I lease my business space here). Which, if you look at it, is roughly 6 miles or $200-250+ million. Sam wants to push for his Burnside couplet/streetcar idea (Metro est. $118.5 mil), and an extension from the newly forming eastside entertainment district to the booming Hollywood district (Metro est. $70 mil) would greatly help develop the very underutilized and low density Sandy Blvd.

Westin, who recently purchased a large swath of Sandy was orginally cold to the idea of a streetcar there... but, he seams to be opening up to the plan...
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  #118  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2007, 10:21 PM
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Westin...I could picture the guy but couldn't come up with his name. I knew it wasn't Benson, that is his tower...I guess Mr. America would work, considering his obsession with the flag...
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  #119  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2007, 12:17 AM
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I think it is spelled Weston.......
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  #120  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2007, 2:40 AM
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Originally Posted by MarkDaMan View Post
^probably has to do something with the fact that a large developer has bought a ton of property in the lower Sandy area and Sam can squeeze him for necessary property levy to get the line built. Lower Sandy can build more dense housing than Hawthorne, the prime Hollywood district also can get higher densities through the neighborhood association than anything on Hawthorne.
mark, is that speculation or something concrete?
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