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  #61  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2008, 7:05 PM
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^ ^ ^

Boy, by looking at one of those quotes you used, some people really must not like innovative and ambitious ideas or theories. People like that are because they think it is uneconomical, stupid, or a waste of time; but in a world can't advance without theories.

Last edited by JDRCRASH; Jan 8, 2008 at 7:18 PM.
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  #62  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2008, 12:25 AM
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DowntownCharlieBrown DowntownCharlieBrown is offline
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Thanks Friday for the info on Hobart and Harvard. I’ll keep them off the front page for now.


From Curbed LA:

Quote:
Last time we stopped by 801 N. Fairfax, an under-construction 93-unit apartment building with 15,600square feet of retail, construction was just getting going. Also, it was sunny. Progress continues, as does the tagging--though the tagging is nothing compared to what's happening in the nearby alleyways off this project. Taggers are going to town back there! Move along 801 N. Fairfax, this area needs a bit of brightness.





Btw, I am not adding developments 5 stories and under to the first page. There are too many of them to track. If the majority feels differently, let me know.
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  #63  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 7:29 PM
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I love the building on Sunset and Vine. I think Hollywood is becoming more and more urban all of the time. It is already somewhat walkable and could be easily developed into an urban paradise, since its one of the only areas of LA with a metro running through it.
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  #64  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 7:38 PM
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I heard on the news that in Century City, 2 40+ story towers are approved.
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  #65  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 8:21 PM
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DowntownCharlieBrown DowntownCharlieBrown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDRCRASH View Post
I heard on the news that in Century City, 2 40+ story towers are approved.
Yes, and as soon as someone can provide a rendering, I will post it on the front page.
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  #66  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 8:29 PM
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Sweet! So, um.....does anybody have any pictures?
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  #67  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 8:39 PM
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Those 2 towers were discussed earlier here:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...5&postcount=23
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  #68  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 10:07 PM
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Don't hold your breath re the two 47 story towers. I work in CC and there has been no activity whatsoever on the property since the demo of the Century Club. The lot is fenced off, that's it. It will probably sit like that for quite awhile.

Meanwhile, the Century looks to be pouring floor no. 8 this week, Yay!
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  #69  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2008, 11:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circuitfiend View Post

Meanwhile, the Century looks to be pouring floor no. 8 this week, Yay!
Floor # 8 and we have no pictures of it out of the ground??? Same with the Carlyle.

First person to post pictures of these two buildings wins a prize!
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  #70  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2008, 6:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circuitfiend View Post
Don't hold your breath re the two 47 story towers. I work in CC and there has been no activity whatsoever on the property since the demo of the Century Club. The lot is fenced off, that's it. It will probably sit like that for quite awhile.

Meanwhile, the Century looks to be pouring floor no. 8 this week, Yay!
the reason there was no action is because they were settling the money issues with the homeowners groups. i think if someone is shelling out 7 million to appease homeowner groups, they are serious developers. i bet these go up.
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  #71  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2008, 6:44 PM
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I hope so. Another Tallest building in Century City is needed.
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  #72  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2008, 11:47 PM
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interesting...

Condos, rentals and retail, with some high-rises, are planned for the sprawling site of the 1930s Wyvernwood apartments.
By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
January 11, 2008
In the Depression-era Wyvernwood Garden Apartments in the heart of East Los Angeles, the electricity often goes off if you try to run a toaster and a coffeepot at the same time. No cable TV, no high-speed Internet, no air conditioning.

The orange stucco buildings in Boyle Heights, home to about 6,000 residents, are showing their age. The neighborhood has been troubled by crime and gang activity for more than a decade. And what was once "America's largest privately owned community of rental homes" is ready for another giant step.

Complete redevelopment
Complete redevelopment
click to enlarge

Generations
Generations
click to enlarge

Wyvernwood Garden Apartments
Graphic
Wyvernwood Garden Apartments
click to enlarge

Thursday the residents got word about dramatic changes ahead, as urban redevelopment -- already remaking Hollywood, Echo Park and downtown -- appears ready to leap across the Los Angeles River. And with it comes excitement and angst about how gentrification will change the old neighborhood.

The Miami investment firm that has owned Wyvernwood since 1998 announced plans for a $2-billion redevelopment that would nearly quadruple its size by 2020. By then, all 1,187 existing units would be replaced with 4,400 environmentally sensitive condominiums and apartments, plus retail space.

If finished as planned, the complex would include some 24-story high-rises and rival in scope Park La Brea in the Fairfax district of Los Angeles, one of the largest housing projects in the West. Wyvernwood would have more than 20,000 residents served by new stores and offices.

Owners said they hoped to be leaders in a revival of Boyle Heights that would bring large-scale residential and commercial investment to some of the city's oldest districts. Developers are jockeying to buy another neighborhood landmark, the historic Sears tower and warehouse on Olympic Boulevard, a few blocks away.

"It's an exciting time for Boyle Heights," said City Councilman Jose Huizar, who has lived in the Latino neighborhood most of his life. He supports plans for Wyvernwood but also put the owners on notice that the tenants must be a priority.

He vowed that the city approval process would include substantial public comment.

"I want to ensure that existing tenants have the first opportunity to live in new homes and that tenants are treated with respect and taken care of," he said.

The developer's executive vice president, Steven Fink, sought to put tenants at ease in a low-key meeting Thursday night for about 200 residents. The development would take at least two years to get city approvals and 10 years more for the stage-by-stage transformation of Wyvernwood, he said.

"No one will be asked to move for any reason associated with this plan until absolutely necessary. . . . We are years away from beginning construction," Fink said.

Residents offered a variety of comments, including concerns about expected rent hikes, increased density and crime protection. The landlord assured tenants they would be eligible for relocation payments if forced to move.

Barbara McNeely has lived in Wyvernwood, which opened in 1939, for 60 years. When she moved in as a youngster, she recalls, the complex had mostly white residents and had a waiting list, and most tenants were college educated.

"They sent you flowers when you moved in," she said. "It was quite beautiful and a very good place to raise kids."

She said she would like to see the comeback of downtown Los Angeles spread into her neighborhood and bring more people with money to spend. Like the popular home-improvement television show, she said, "We need an extreme makeover."

Things have changed since the 70-acre complex was hailed by the builders as "unusually practical and thoroughly comfortable and convenient." The 153 mostly two-story buildings in a park-like setting were considered the nation's largest housing development, so big the builders had to set up a sawmill there to cut enough lumber.

After World War II, the character of the neighborhood began to change; many of its more prosperous residents moved to the suburbs as "white flight" swept Southern California. By the late 1980s, Wyvernwood had a reputation as a haven for gangs

Things have generally gotten better at Wyvernwood in recent years, said Juan Flores, 76, who with his wife, Andrea, moved into the apartments 30 years ago. In the 1980s, he said, drug dealers trolled the neighborhood, drunks stumbled about and young gang members shot it out. One of his sons was assaulted once and his car was shot up one day.

But in the 1990s, security guards were hired to work at the apartments, and things improved, he said.

Today, units at Wyvernwood that range from one to three bedrooms now rent for $1,225 to $1,540 a month.

The new apartments would rent for substantially more, but no estimates of rents or condo prices have been given. Owner Fifteen Group Land & Development plans to make 15% of the units affordable under city guidelines based on income and family size. Existing tenants would have priority.

The owner of the Sears tower and warehouse building wants to sell it for an enormous residential and retail development. Popular Los Angeles boxer Oscar De La Hoya and Fifteen Group are among those interested.

"People totally underestimate the economy of Boyle Heights," said Mark Weinstein, owner of the Sears building.

The $900-million Gold Line light rail under construction in the area is causing hardships for local merchants now but is expected to attract millions of dollars' worth of investment from real estate developers who want to build housing and shops around its stations.

Wyvernwood is about a mile south of the new rail line, but the developers propose adding streets to the complex that would improve connections to public transit and make it easier for police and other emergency responders to get around. Some of the streets would restore thoroughfares that were closed in the late 1930s when Wyvernwood was built.

Sister Jennie Lechtenberg, who has served in Boyle Heights for 45 years, said she was in favor "of giving people a better place to live and supporting them with things that make life convenient."

Such development could help address problems at Wyvernwood, she said.

"When people live so closely together and they don't have all the things they need, it breeds problems -- gang problems, family and economic problems."

Neighborhoods east of the Los Angeles River "have a lot of potential for infill development over time," said former city Planning Director Con Howe, who now manages a fund that provides money for low-cost housing. "It's definitely a strengthening neighborhood."

Howe said he was skeptical about whether there would be enough economic growth in the area to support high-rise condos. But developer Fink said that such towers were years away and that he expected the market to pick up in the meantime.

The word Wyvernwood has mythical origins -- a wyvern is a winged dragon in ancient lore. How the name came to East Los Angeles is unknown, but Wyvernwood was the first of a handful of "garden city" projects built in Los Angeles in the middle of the last century, said Linda Dishman of the Los Angeles Conservancy.

Other examples included Lincoln Place in Venice, which is being turned into a condominium complex. Chase Knolls in Sherman Oaks was threatened with demolition in 2000 but was declared a cultural monument by the city and continues to operate as apartments.

"These complexes have been somewhat under attack," Dishman said, but the conservancy hasn't decided whether to make an issue of Wyvernwood's historic status. "We'll wait to see the plans."

Resident Juan Flores said he was not too worried about the changes coming for the Wyvernwood. He'd like to stay, but he's philosophical about it all.

"I don't think we have the force to make the owner do otherwise," Flores said. "He's going to do what he wants. If I can stay here anyway, I'll stay."
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  #73  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2008, 11:52 PM
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^ Thank you Gold Line!
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  #74  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2008, 7:33 PM
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Views from Hollywood

Saw Kathy Griffin at the “Kodak Shopping Mall”, as she referred to it in her show and stayed a night at the Renaissance Hotel. Saturday was a gorgeous day and the hotel had some spectacular views.


Pulling into Hollywood with view of cranes from The W at Hollywood and Vine



Cool lighting on exterior of Geisha House Restaurant



Scene from the Hollywood and Highland complex



Views from the Hotel

Century City and Westwood to the West



Downtown to the East



View toward Sunset and Vine




View across Hollywood with Korea town upper right and DT upper left

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  #75  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2008, 3:35 AM
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Awesome pics DowntownCharlieBrown!
That last one showed how ripe that skyline is ready for growth.

The revitalization appears to be penatrating all across the County.
Ex.
Baldwin Park Revitalization
San Fernando Valley Mega-mall
Santa Anita Mega Mall

I know it sounds silly, but when you think about it, Los Angeles IS booming!
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  #76  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2008, 7:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DowntownCharlieBrown View Post
Floor # 8 and we have no pictures of it out of the ground??? Same with the Carlyle.

First person to post pictures of these two buildings wins a prize!
Photos of the Century can be found here:
http://www.webcor.com/current.html?proj_id=239

and has its own thread here:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=130790
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  #77  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2008, 3:54 AM
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The Century

Thanks Steve for posting the website.

Here is the update on The Century from the website:


Quote:
January 2008

The tower structure has reached level 8 with a 6-day-per-floor cycle. The MEP rough-in is progressing through level 3 and the top track has begun on level 3 and 4. The exterior skin of precast for the high-rise and exterior stone for the low-rise is set to begin this month.
All pictures from Webcor









Still looking for pictures of the Carlyle.
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  #78  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2008, 4:36 AM
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That overhead shot is cool. It shows the dual core structure.
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  #79  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2008, 6:48 AM
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Ooh,The Century reminds me of something minor out of Dubai.
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  #80  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2008, 5:22 PM
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I've been hoping someone would post photos of the site of the Tussand's wax museum next to Grauman's Chinese Theater, which broke ground several months ago. But this video of work on it is even better:


Nothing better than seeing another gap or deadzone being sent to the great beyond!

The former parking lot directly next to Grauman's has been one of the major gaps on Hollywood Blvd, & in the hood overall. So to know it's finally being replaced deserves a round of:



A vid of the same site at the beginning of work.
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