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Old Posted Dec 11, 2007, 4:59 AM
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San Francisco Of The Past In Black & White

Another photograph thread of San Francisco with the majority of the photographs found here, http://content.cdlib.org/view;jsessi...tems&brand=oac
and a few more that can be found here, http://content.cdlib.org/view?docId=...tems&brand=oac
All from the Online Archive of California, Bancroft Library.


^Grand Stand in front of the City Hall on the Polk St. side. Sept. 10/23. N.S.G. [Native Sone of the Golden] West Parade

^St. John's Church. Old church at the cor. 15th and Julian Ave. at the time of the fire of April 18th, 1906.

Opening of the Ball Season at San Francisco 1924. Chief of Police W. J. O'Brien.

Oct. 25/24. Inspection S.F.P. [San Francisco Police] Dept.

Civic Center construction

Union Square from Stockton St. bet. Post & Geary Sts. in 1880

Masonic Temple, N.W. cor. Montgomery & Post Sts. in 1879

North from Geary St. bet. Stockton & Powell Sts. 1905

West from Market, Fulton & Leavenworth Sts. Jany. 1929.

North on 3rd St. from Howard St. Feb. 1929.

The U.S. Mint, N.W. cor. 5th & Mission St. in 1889

North on Mission St. from Army St. July 31/31

On May 23/32, later destroyed. U.S.S. Akron over San Francisco showing bay and ocean. Piggott Photo, S.F.

Jany 1932. California Street, San Francisco. Piggott, S.F.

Jany 1932. Looking down on California Street, San Francisco. Piggott Photo.

Sky line, San Francisco. Standard Oil Bldg. Shell Oil Bldg. Piggott Photo

Birds Eye View, Nob Hill. San Francisco, Cal. Piggott Photo.

Financial District, San Francisco, Cal. Piggott Photo.

Union Square, 1934. Cathedral Monument, Knight Templar Conclave, July, 7-13-1934. San Francisco, Calif.

N.W. from top of the Examiner Bldg. 3rd & Market Sts. 1928

German cruiser Nurnberg 1914 in San Francisco Bay. Later destroyed off Cape Horn by the British War vessel.

Portola Parade Oct. 22-25-1912 [1910?].

Looking North on 3rd St. from Mission St., 1915.

The City Hall from McAllister St. looking West, 1889.

City Hall from Hyde St. in 1889.

Old church S.E. corner Gough and Eddy St., 1914.

Fleet Week, Sept. 1919.

Howard West from 9th St., 1920.

At the opening of the P.P.I. [Panama-Pacific International] Exposition, 1915. State and City officers in the lead of the Parade at the Fillmore Entrance. In the group are the following: Gov. Hiram Johnson, Mayor Jas. Rolph Jr., Supervisor Nelson, W.D. Fennimore, Jesse B. Cook, Judge F.M. Angellotti, Postmaster C.W. Fay, Attorney J.J. Lermen, T.A. Reardon of the Board of Works, Dr. T.B. Leland, Angelo J. Rossi.

The Santa Fe Building, S.W. cor. 2nd and Market St.

S.F. [San Francisco] from Pine and Kearny, North West, about 1889.

L to R: Capt. H. Wright - Chief Wiley, Dept. of Electricity - Capt. H. Gleeson, S.F. [San Francisco] Police Dept. - Commissioner Ehrman, S.F.F. [Fire] Dept. - Ed. Rainey, Sect. To Mayor Rolph and Chief D.J. O'Brien, S.F.P [Police] Dept., Sept. 1st, 1921

Quite a lot of photos continued in a later post; and that's all for now. Thanks for looking.
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Last edited by BigKidD; Dec 13, 2007 at 10:20 PM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2007, 6:01 AM
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Wonderful! I love these threads....
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  #3  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2007, 7:29 AM
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I watched that church at Gough and Eddy burn--a huge loss IMHO. It was beautiful and unusual in that it was gothic but built of redwood, not stone. The fire was believed to have been started by some homeless people they had given shelter.

SF sure had some strange architecture. I saw one building in there that was a combo of gothic and Victorian. Couldn't have even imagined that until now.

But a lot of those photos look very familiar. It's kind of amazing how much remains, having survived the quake and everything.
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Old Posted Dec 11, 2007, 9:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTinSF View Post
I watched that church at Gough and Eddy burn--a huge loss IMHO. It was beautiful and unusual in that it was gothic but built of redwood, not stone. The fire was believed to have been started by some homeless people they had given shelter.

SF sure had some strange architecture. I saw one building in there that was a combo of gothic and Victorian. Couldn't have even imagined that until now.

But a lot of those photos look very familiar. It's kind of amazing how much remains, having survived the quake and everything.
I checked google maps to see what now sits at Gough & Eddy St. only to discover that there's nothing there. I would of assumed the congregation would have tried to rebuild there former church, but I guess I was wrong. Also, out of all the photos I found, I felt the snowstorm one and the one below to be the most impressive.
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“Most planning of the past fifteen years has been based upon three destructive fallacies: the cataclysmic insists upon tearing everything down in order to design from an absolutely clean slate; the automotive would plan for the free passage of the automobile at the expense of all other values; the suburban dislikes the city anyway and would just as soon destroy its density and strew it across the countryside.” Vince Scully
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Old Posted Dec 13, 2007, 2:24 PM
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Breathtaking.
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Old Posted Dec 13, 2007, 10:20 PM
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Market Street Area


Market Street below Beale Street. Studebaker Brothers, the Palace Carriage Repository. Ca. 1885.

Market Street between Drumm and Davis. Tea store, with teapot on top of post; Hansford Block, with Wellman-Peck (canned goods), Dodge-Sweeney (canned goods), and M.J. Brandenstein (tea and coffee -- now M.J.B.). Ca. 1895.

Beale Street between Market and Mission. Dunham, Carrigan and Hayden Company (hardware); Albert Mau and Company. Ca. 1890.

South side of Market between First and Second. Standard Soap Company. Ca. 1890.

Market and Pine. Eagle Building on extreme right. Ca. 1890.

Bird's eye view toward Telegraph Hill. Fremont between Mission and Howard. Joshua Hendy Machine Works left center [now in Sunnyvale]. [Photograph by Taber]

The later Niantic Building. Onseti Company [now Onseti and O'Connor]. 1880s.

Bank of California. Photograph. Ca. 1888.

Bank of California to the left.

Montgomery Street looking south from California. Express Building at extreme left; California Safe Deposit and Trust Company left center; Palace Hotel in far distance. Ca. 1880.

California Street looking east. California Safe Deposit and Trust Company on right; Express Building on left; Parrott Building extreme left (stone imported from China), which became the Emporium after the fire. 1875.

California and Battery, north corner. Bank of California in distance. 1875.

Montgomery Street north from Market. Grand Army of the Republic convention, 1886.

Looking up Post Street at conjunction of Montgomery, Market, and Post. Chronicle Building at left; Crocker Building; Masonic Temple. Ca. 1900 or 1902. [Photograph by Waters and Co.]

Bush Street looking west from Sansome. California Neck Tie Factory; Brooklyn Hotel; hacks and hotel stagecoach (called "bus"). Ca. 1875. [Photograph by Turrill & Miller]

California and Sansome. Plank street. W.T. Coleman & Company. Ca. 1865.

Merchants Exchange. 1880s.

Express Building. Telegraph pole. Ca. 1863.

Snowstorm of 1882. Market and Post. Palace Hotel on left.

Business blocks of San Francisco. Montgomery Street from the corner of Pine, looking north. 1888. [Reproduced from ? July 7th, 1888.]

California Theater. Bush Street between Kearny and Dupont. Engine 11 on right. [California Theater was replaced by the California Hotel later, which had brick chimneys on the east wall next to the firehouse. The morning of the earthquake, the chimneys fell through the firehouse to the basement, causing the death of the fire chief, Dennis Sullivan, and {the injury of} his wife. Throughout the fire, the various fire companies were on their own.] Ca. 1870. (The California Theater cost $125,000 to build.

View of San Francisco. Ca. 1860. Goat Island.

Russ House. Montgomery between Bush and Pine. [Now Russ Building.]

Vienna Garden at Stockton and Sutter. Temple Emanuel. (Vienna Garden was formerly the Tivoli Gardens.)

Geary Street looking west from Dupont. Unitarian Church on extreme left; Calvary Presbyterian Church (gothic windows) in distance [now site of St. Francis Hotel]; Trinity Episcopal Church on right. Ca. 1880.

The White House. J.W. Davidson & Company. Decorated for a celebration. Ca. 1886.

Union Square, looking northwest. Trinity Church to the left; Temple Emanuel center; Huntington and Stanford homes in the background. 1880.

Kearny and Geary Streets. Lotta's Fountain. 1885. [Photograph by Taber]

Looking southeast from California and Jones. Temple Emanuel in center; Palace Hotel in far distance. Ca. 1880.

Society of California Pioneers building. Fourth and Pioneer Place. June 2, 1888.

Spreckels Building. Third and Market. [Call Building.] Ca. 1904.

Market and Taylor Sts. Weinstock-Lubin. Ca. 1905.

Hall of Justice. East side of Portsmouth Square. March 13, 1906. [Photograph by Turrill & Miller]

St. Patrick's Church. Mission St. looking east from Fourth.

Looking down Kearny Street from Telegraph Hill. Hall of Justice on left; Call Building distant right. 1906.

DeYoung Museum. Called the Palace of Fine Arts in 1894. The green wall near the present DeYoung Museum is all that remains of the original.

GAR Arch on Market Street, looking east from Grand Avenue. Parade in progress. July 4, 1886.

Sharpshooters of the Vigilante Committee. May 15, 1856.

Looking East on Geary St. from Stockton. See the Chronicle and Palace at end of street, 1895.

South on Fillmore St. from Fulton St. Feb. 1928.

Diamond Jubilee, San Francisco
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“Most planning of the past fifteen years has been based upon three destructive fallacies: the cataclysmic insists upon tearing everything down in order to design from an absolutely clean slate; the automotive would plan for the free passage of the automobile at the expense of all other values; the suburban dislikes the city anyway and would just as soon destroy its density and strew it across the countryside.” Vince Scully
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Old Posted Dec 18, 2007, 8:34 AM
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Great find! I hope you don't mind me adding to your thread, BigKidD, but I went around to some of these sites today to do a little then-and-now comparison. I didn't have copies of the originals with me, so I had to shoot these from memory. You kind of get the idea though.

Southwest corner of Market and Second
1918:


2007:


Market below Beale
1885:


2007:


Market between Drumm and Davis
1895:


2007:


Beale between Market and Mission
1890:


2007 (I'm not sure which side of the street is shown in the original, so here are both sides today):



Note: the old PG&E building (on the left) wasn't completed until 1924, so it not being in the original isn't much help.

Market between First and Second
1890:


2007:


Market and Pine
1890:


2007:


North on Montgomery from Market
1886:


2007:


Post/Montgomery and Market
1900 or 1902:


2007:
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Old Posted Dec 19, 2007, 9:06 PM
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Good job with the then and now photos peanut gallery. Also, I wish Market and Post St. retained its older buildings. It was quite a crossing of streets,

http://www.flickr.com/photos/11986285@N06/1321289651/
Furthermore, I find it interesting that the building at Market and Pine is very reminiscent of the building that preceded it.
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“Most planning of the past fifteen years has been based upon three destructive fallacies: the cataclysmic insists upon tearing everything down in order to design from an absolutely clean slate; the automotive would plan for the free passage of the automobile at the expense of all other values; the suburban dislikes the city anyway and would just as soon destroy its density and strew it across the countryside.” Vince Scully
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Old Posted Dec 19, 2007, 9:22 PM
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Originally Posted by BigKidD View Post
I checked google maps to see what now sits at Gough & Eddy St. only to discover that there's nothing there. I would of assumed the congregation would have tried to rebuild there former church, but I guess I was wrong.
They are a very committed bunch (of Lutherans). They are going to rebuild but not anything as grand as the old church and the new structure will, I believe, have substantial space for homeless services which I find very "Christian" considering how their original church burned.
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Old Posted Dec 20, 2007, 1:23 AM
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They are a very committed bunch (of Lutherans). They are going to rebuild but not anything as grand as the old church and the new structure will, I believe, have substantial space for homeless services which I find very "Christian" considering how their original church burned.
That would be nice, but I read that the another church would not be built. Their thought of being a church without walls sounds very Christian to me, but I'm slightly saddened that another church will not be constructed. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...&sn=002&sc=840
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Old Posted Dec 21, 2007, 9:07 PM
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Thanks BigKidD. In most of those cases, I wish they could have retained more of the old stuff.
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Old Posted Dec 22, 2007, 9:33 AM
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Amazing pictures! Looks very European with a mix of the Wild Wild West.
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Old Posted Dec 30, 2007, 5:08 PM
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As much as I love downtown SF as it is now I wish some of those neo-Gothic and Italianate buildings had survived.

It's also interesting how the mainstream ethos of the city has changed. That looked very much like a city at work, and one full of churches, patriotic parades and vigilante committees, while it now projects itself as a hedonistic city and a militantly secular, politically radical one. I guess that could be said of any city to a certain extent, but it's particularly noticeable in San Francisco's case.
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Old Posted Dec 30, 2007, 5:59 PM
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What a century full of changes for SF!
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2008, 12:20 AM
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Masonic Temple, N.W. cor. Montgomery & Post Sts. in 1879

.
Nice picture. It looks like the palm trees are just planted then. Are they still there today, but much taller?
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Old Posted Feb 27, 2008, 11:27 PM
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Fascinating insight into SF's past, both pre earthquake and after it.

The preponderance of all the Italianate and Gothic architecture in the photos is certainly very striking, even if there's not that much extant.
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Old Posted Feb 28, 2008, 12:03 AM
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^^^There's a lot more remaining than people realize. Some of it has been covered up by ugly modern facades (the 60's were a period in which a lot of that was done) and a few of those are now being stripped off such as at the DeYoung Building, now reborn as the Ritz Carlton Residences.

Here is a photo (taken by me) of the DeYoung showing 2 sections of the brick facade that have been restored with a section of the unrestored brick between them after the ugly 60's cladding has been stripped off:



And this photo (also by me) shows some of the buildings wonderful brick detail:



I think there are a lot more such gems under 60s sheet metal around town besides the ones just hidden by larger modern structures.
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Old Posted Feb 28, 2008, 1:17 AM
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That's interesting to know, I wonder how much is still hidden.

I haven't actually been yet so am just gaugeing on pictures and what I've heard.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2008, 1:30 AM
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Originally Posted by the Misanthropist View Post
As much as I love downtown SF as it is now I wish some of those neo-Gothic and Italianate buildings had survived.

It's also interesting how the mainstream ethos of the city has changed. That looked very much like a city at work, and one full of churches, patriotic parades and vigilante committees, while it now projects itself as a hedonistic city and a militantly secular, politically radical one. I guess that could be said of any city to a certain extent, but it's particularly noticeable in San Francisco's case.
What rubbish. It's still a city at work (just not the dirty and industrial type) and America's San Francisco has always been hedonistic, much more secular than sacred -from the Gold Rush days when the City was mostly filled with a ton of greedy & adventurous upper-middle class, lonely and horny young men visiting the 'cribs' to "society ladies" visiting the opium dens to the Berkeley bohemians, the North Beach beats, Haight hippies, Castro gays....and the beat goes on....more patriotic and racist than later -yep..but when compared to the rest of the country...well it's never been Peoria Misanthropist.
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Last edited by ozone; Apr 9, 2008 at 1:48 AM.
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