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  #1  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2008, 6:04 AM
LAofAnaheim LAofAnaheim is offline
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Pico & Olympic One-way

Let's stop this ridiculous initiative to make Pico/Olympic one-ways. We need to preserve the on-street parking that we have in the area to create walkable cities, not a surburban street with no on-street parking and retail going into strip malls and losing the store fronts b/c there is no street parking. No more freeways on residential streets!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/petition/854136962
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  #2  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 5:33 AM
vincebjs vincebjs is offline
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Maybe it's because I never drove on those streets during rush hour, but is it really necessary to turn them into one-way streets?

I don't know, especially in the area just west of downtown, Pico and Olympic are pretty far from each other, I don't know if they'd make a good east-west one-way pair. For example, Olympic is solidly Koreatown whereas Pico is really Latin.
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  #3  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 6:30 AM
solongfullerton solongfullerton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAofAnaheim View Post
Let's stop this ridiculous initiative to make Pico/Olympic one-ways. We need to preserve the on-street parking that we have in the area to create walkable cities, not a surburban street with no on-street parking and retail going into strip malls and losing the store fronts b/c there is no street parking. No more freeways on residential streets!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/petition/854136962
I'm only familiar with these two streets west of Century City, but hasn't street parking been eliminated already during "rush hour"?
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  #4  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 6:49 AM
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WesTheAngelino WesTheAngelino is offline
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I think it's a fantastic idea. I for one livei n downtown at Washington and Main. I work at the Beverly Center. It would be fantastic for me to be able to take Pico or Olympic (not sure which is going west in that case). Something must be done to put a patch on the bleeding sore that is crosstown traffic in this city until some major projects (rail) are completed.

As for parking....there is a finite number of street parking spots available. Plus, I'm not certain of this so correct me please if I'm mistaken, but I would think both these major streets have parking restrictions that screw things up as it is (i.e. no parking from 7-9 or 4-7 to allow another lane for traffic). Let's face a sad reality: unlike the smaller cities that surround us, LA has no parking plan. Just like WeHo, Pasadena, SM, etc. we need to invest NOW in municipal lots with no or neglible rates for on street parking. The retail giants of SM, Old Town, etc. are not supported very much by street parking, but by smartly placed, smartly designed and in most cases publicly owned parking lots.
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  #5  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 7:31 AM
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Actually street parking is the most expensive and biggest causes of congestion in dense environments on many streets, unless they're one way because folks are circling and idlying around looking for a curb spot.

Where as strategically located structures and appropriate signage (Old Town Pasadena is an excellent example, even Larchmont and Leimert Park are good examples of this layout/design) that would provide the needs for the local shopping area in the street grid and a better use of street space that can then provide the use of the curb lane for buses or bicycles or wider sidewalks with bigger street trees and landscaping. You know creating an complete pedestrian friendly public street!

However, if curb lane parking is offered that has to be the most expensive parking, so that motorists will be trained to look for the provided structure or find alternative means of mobility to access the business or only use that curb space for short hop in and out trips.
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  #6  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2008, 5:51 PM
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FYI, Larry Mantle is going to be talking about this on 89.3 KPCC at 10:00 today.
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  #7  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2008, 9:39 PM
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http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...ck=7&cset=true

From the Los Angeles Times
Mayor evades council roadblock on Pico-Olympic plan
Antonio Villaraigosa orders lane and parking changes to ease Westside gridlock, despite opposition from two councilmen.
By Sharon Bernstein
Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

February 15, 2008

Despite fierce opposition from residents and concerns by two City Council members, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has ordered Los Angeles transportation officials to implement a plan to make Pico Boulevard mostly one-way eastbound, and Olympic Boulevard mostly one-way westbound.

Under the mayor's plan, which had stalled earlier this week in a City Council committee, parking would be forbidden on all but a few stretches of Pico and Olympic during rush hour beginning March 8.

Traffic signals would be timed to favor faster eastbound traffic on Pico and westbound traffic on Olympic by April 28. After six months to a year, the two streets probably would be restriped so that Pico would have four lanes going east and two going west, while Olympic would have four lanes going west and two going east, a spokesman for the mayor said Thursday.

The move comes a day after Councilmen Bill Rosendahl and Herb Wesson said they might remove their districts from the proposal because of concerns from local businesses and residents that the changes would harm shops and restaurants by making it impossible for customers to park.

On Thursday, the mayor, backed by Westside Councilman Jack Weiss, overrode the council's Transportation Committee, which had postponed action on the plan, saying through a spokesman that the council did not have jurisdiction over such issues as parking regulations or whether streets were one-way.

"The Department of Transportation reports to the mayor," said Matt Szabo, a spokesman for Villaraigosa.

The mayor reduced the size of the project by more than a mile.

It was initially supposed to run from the Santa Monica city limits to La Brea Avenue. Now, the idea is for it to end at Fairfax Avenue. The change is apparently a nod to Wesson, because the project no longer goes through a part of his district for which he expressed concern.

Weiss' strong support for the idea has come despite some heated opposition from merchants in the Pico-Robertson district.

The mayor's end-run around those council members underscores his effort to do something about Los Angeles' traffic, particularly on the Westside.

A spokesman for Wesson said the councilman did not know about the mayor's move late Thursday and could not comment.

Wesson just Wednesday said he would submit a motion to make the program's eastern terminus Fairfax Avenue -- effectively removing most of his district. Villaraigosa's plan seems to address that issue.

But the mayor did not address the concerns raised by Rosendahl, who had demanded Wednesday that the Department of Transportation confer with city planners before moving forward on such a drastic reordering of streets. Rosendahl had threatened to remove his district -- which is west of the San Diego Freeway -- from the proposal if city planners were not consulted.

"It's unfortunate that the planning department is not going to be engaged," Rosendahl said. "Planning and transportation should be joined at the hip. . . . You just don't bowl over the community like that. You have to appreciate who's there. It's disrespectful to my constituents, and it's an insult to my constituents."

Hundreds of residents and businesses along the two streets oppose the plan.

Anticipating the protest, transportation officials scaled back the hours of the proposal and have offered to allow some parking -- mostly in the districts of two councilmen who have opposed the plan.

Transportation officials Thursday hustled to restart the plan, and by day's end Villaraigosa deputy Jaime De La Vega had sent a memo to transportation chief Rita Robinson ordering her to begin implementing it.

Word of the mayor's order spread quickly among residents and business owners who oppose it.

"We were promised answers to our questions," said Mike Eveloff, president of Tract 7260, a homeowners group near Century City. "We have not gotten those answers. There has been no meaningful input, and now the plan is happening anyway."

Weiss' support of the plan has generated significant ire among constituents, who styled themselves as "District 5 Orphans" at a City Council committee hearing on the matter Wednesday.

Weiss also received a veiled jab from Rosendahl at the hearing: If both he and Wesson pulled out, Rosendahl told transportation officials, "You can keep it in the 5th District."

Weiss struck back Thursday, saying that the changes were for the good of the city as a whole.

"The quarter-million people of my district and the 4 million people of this city want immediate traffic relief," Weiss said. "So this should not be about the parochial interests of a few -- it should be about what's good for the whole city."

Under the current plan, Pico would have three eastbound lanes during rush hour because the parking lane on that side would become a traffic lane. Parts of the northern side of the street -- used by westbound traffic -- would continue to have parking, so there would only be two lanes in that direction in some spots.

Olympic would gain an extra westbound lane in the same manner. Both streets already have significant parking restrictions in some stretches, but not along the entire route.

Times staff writer Martha Groves contributed to this report.
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  #8  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2008, 9:44 PM
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Well, I'm torn on this issue; one way streets are never good for the walkablility of an area and they're even worse for business. But LA is such a sprawling mess that maybe we should give up on trying to make cute neighborhoods and focus on what effects people today; traffic. I mean, it's not like pico had any redeeming qualities in the first place. I guess that's why I moved.
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