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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2008, 10:30 PM
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Rapid Transit

The Rapid Transit Feasibility Study was released this morning. Contains a lot of details.

The report......

http://www.myhamilton.ca/NR/rdonlyre...r14PW08043.pdf
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2008, 11:38 PM
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Providing BRT services along the two identified routes is estimated to have a capital cost of $480 million, including for construction and maintenance, and servicing and storage facility (improvements), and 25 additional articulated hybrid buses (estimated cost of $900,000 each). Operating costs are estimated to be $80/revenue hour/vehicle. Based on MoveOntario 2020, Provincial and Federal funding for capital for rapid transit along these two corridors could be expected, but the amount to be expected is still to be determined.

The construction costs for BRT are based on an estimate of $6.5 million/km for one-way streets, and $9 million/km for two-way streets.

Providing LRT services along the two identified routes has an estimated capital cost of $1.1 billion, including construction, bridge improvements, Escarpment crossing tunnels and a new garage or storage facility. The cost for Light Rail Vehicles is estimated to be $4 million each. Operating costs are estimated at $175/revenue hour/vehicle. Funding from the MoveOntario 2020 initiative is also expected, at the levels indicated above for BRT.

The construction costs for LRT are based on estimates of $15 million/km for one-way streets and $25 million/km for two-way streets. It should be noted that Hamilton can request additional funding from Metrolinx, or other Provincial or Federal programs as appropriate.
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2008, 11:49 PM
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I can understand the need for the tunnel as being a West Mount resident there's only Beckett (Queen St) and James Mountain access for the West End, which both is a single narrow lane. Come around 7-9 in the morning and check Garth St from Mohawk to Beckett Drive all solid congestion traffic, since there's two lanes narrowing down to a single lane down the Mountain.

One of the reason there was protest for high density housing development for the Chedoke land was because it'll mean more people and more people cramming up Beckett and James Mountain access.

Now closing James Mountain for BRT or LRT instead of no tunnel you'll face a revolt from some West Mount residents, Whitehead will be flipping lol.
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 12:44 AM
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The West Mount residents will need to ride the LRT to avoid congestion.
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  #5  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 1:05 AM
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Hamilton’s on the road to a transit revolution

April 10, 2008
By Nicole MacIntyre

Transit users rejoice and car junkies brace yourselves — Hamilton is preparing for a transportation revolution.

The city is working on a new rapid transit system that it hopes will pull upwards of 20 per cent of cars off the road over the next few decades.

This spring, the public will have an opportunity to comment on two options: a rapid bus system or a light rail transit line.

Regardless of which option prevails, rapid transit will transform Hamiltonians’ daily commute, said Gerry Davis, director of capital planning and implementation. “We want to get people out of their cars.”

A bus rapid system would mean dedicated transit lanes and advanced lights for buses. James Mountain Road would also be closed, except for transit. A light rail system, like those in Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, Scarborough and Ottawa — would also take up space currently devoted to cars.

“A lot of car drivers aren’t going to like it,” said Councillor Brian McHattie. “It will be controversial.”

But, he argues, if the city wants to change the status quo, it must embrace a transit plan that is bold.

The city is hoping to capitalize on provincial funding after the government declared rapid transit a priority. More than $30 million has already been committed to the city’s rapid transit system.

Rapid transit would be dedicated to three main corridors: King and Main streets from McMaster to Eastgate Square; James and Upper James streets; and an east-west Mountain route.

McHattie favours a light rail system from downtown to McMaster as a start.

A group of transit users has been building support for a light rail option for months, lobbying city staff and creating a website.

While light rail costs more, it has the potential to generate economic development and increase ridership, said advocate Nicholas Kevlahan. “If Hamilton holds back once again, we’ll see another community surge ahead.”


WHICH ROUTE WOULD YOU TAKE?

Imagine sitting at a red light in 10 years and watching a packed bus or train whiz by, beating you to the same destination. Would it be enough to make you toss away your car keys?

The city is planning for a new rapid transit system that officials hope will encourage thousands of Hamiltonians to leave their cars at home.

Councillors will have their first look at a rapid transit feasibility study next week before it heads out for public input this spring.

Officials say it’s important that the city consider the two rapid transit options — light rail transit or rapid buses — from a financial, environmental and social perspective.

Combining the two systems is also possible. There’s hope the province would pick up the capital cost of building either system.

LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT
Capital costs:
$15 million per km for one-way streets
$25 million per km for two-way streets
$4 million per light rail vehicle
Operating cost:
$175 per hour running per vehicle, but holds more passengers than a bus.

Highlights:
- Runs at street level, propelled by overhead electrical wires
- Carries at least twice as many passengers as rapid buses
- More permanent than bus route, known to inspire economic development along a line
- More attractive to riders
- Would require an underground tunnel to make it up the Mountain.

BUS RAPID TRANSIT
Capital costs:
$6.5 million per km for one-way streets
$9 million per km for two-way streets
$900,000 per new articulated hybrid bus
$80 per hour running per bus

Highlights:
- Greater flexibility than rail system
- Fewer operating constraints, such as overhead bridges
- Can handle escarpment grade on James Mountain Road
- Less “sexy” to new riders
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  #6  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 1:12 AM
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Excellent. So happy to see a continuation of the timidly positive line on LRT which the Spec seems to have endorsed. However, a truly responsible paper would have undertaken a more critical analysis of the report. In the long term, the per hour operating costs of BRT will almost assuredly surpass those of LRT.
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  #7  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 1:16 AM
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I encourage everyone here at SSP:Local Hamilton attend this open house in the spring.

Perhaps make it a forum meet and meet at the same time.
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  #8  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 1:31 AM
DHLawrence DHLawrence is offline
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The figures given in that article make it sound like they're promoting BRT by saying it costs less--that's all that less discerning readers will notice.
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  #9  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 1:51 AM
go_leafs_go02 go_leafs_go02 is online now
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but the descriptions sound alot more like they support LRT, include saying that it is more sexy to attract new riders, that it is more expensive, but yet holds alot more players.

And read this:

Highlights:
- Greater flexibility than rail system
- Fewer operating constraints, such as overhead bridges
- Can handle escarpment grade on James Mountain Road
- Less “sexy” to new riders

LESS doesn't sound like a highlight
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:19 AM
coalminecanary coalminecanary is offline
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Something has got to be fundamentally wrong with their calculations. Everything else I have read puts LRT way below BRT in operational costs, and that's at current oil prices. How can this report clain that LRT costs twice as much to operate as BRT?

And another thing... why are they planning for a TUNNEL for the n/s route? Why not use claremont??
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  #11  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:25 AM
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Originally Posted by coalminecanary View Post
And another thing... why are they planning for a TUNNEL for the n/s route? Why not use claremont??
Cause A-Line goes along James to James Mountain Access. Unless you want A-Line to turn on Main from James and up along Wellington.

"The ability of LRT vehicles to handle grades, such as those found on Hamilton’s Escarpment crossings is more limited that that of BRT vehicles. James Mountain Road has grades up to 10.7%; BRT vehicles can handle these grades with some impacts to their operating speed, but the use of LRT vehicles on steep slopes like these is precluded. To allow LRT vehicles to cross the Escarpment in this location, twin 6.5m diameter tunnels at 5% grades would be required. These tunnels would extend from approximately St. Joseph’s Hospital to Mohawk College."
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  #12  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:35 AM
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Another problem with LRT....

"Increased vertical clearance is required for LRT vehicles and their pantographs than for BRT vehicles. Two structures, the TH&B bridge over James Street South (3.9m vertical clearance) and the pedestrian bridge over King Street West at Summers Lane (4.2m) are too low to allow LRT vehicles to pass under them, as LRT vehicles require 4.8m vertical clearance."

Looks like the pedestrian bridge over King has to go. Get replaced and raised higher.

They should re-route A-Line to turn on Main and go up Wellington (use Claremont access instead) and link up with Upper James directly. A short detour to Fennell to link up Mohawk and then back to Upper James. Doing that you won't have to build a tunnel and redo the TH&B bridge over James. Probably save millions doing that.
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Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:42 AM
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Those bridges on James and John need to be replaced and perhaps dug out deeper and widened in order to allow better bus service in case we move the HSR terminal to the GO centre. All in the process. I'm soo shocked no vehicles have been clipped underneath there, lower the intersections at Hunter on both James and John, and get rid of that central pillar. They'll eventually have to go, they're an eyesore in alot of ways, and replacement would help all modes of transportation (cars, buses, and LRT)
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  #14  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:49 AM
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Or just leave it and go with BRT for A-Line, which I say is 70% chance of happening. I would be super shocked if council approved LRT for A-Line.
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  #15  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:51 AM
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Dream big, dream big.

No one does around here, this city has the MOST potential arguably amongst all cities in Ontario. But yet, look where it is. A LRT system going on two lines would be the best thing we need. Sure Artic buses are nice, but they aren't really that different than a conventional bus.
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  #16  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by go_leafs_go02 View Post
Those bridges on James and John need to be replaced and perhaps dug out deeper and widened in order to allow better bus service in case we move the HSR terminal to the GO centre. All in the process. I'm soo shocked no vehicles have been clipped underneath there, lower the intersections at Hunter on both James and John, and get rid of that central pillar. They'll eventually have to go, they're an eyesore in alot of ways, and replacement would help all modes of transportation (cars, buses, and LRT)
The bridges have historic value, I kinda like them.
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  #17  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:55 AM
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My predicition is that council will support two phases for the East-West corridor. First LRT line from McMaster to Downtown. Then Downtown to Eastgate. BRT for A-Line.
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  #18  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:57 AM
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I'm gonna agree with that prediction as a best case scenario.
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"Above all, Hamilton must learn to think like a city, not a suburban hybrid where residents drive everywhere. What makes Hamilton interesting is the fact it's a city. The sprawl that surrounds it, which can be found all over North America, is running out of time."
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  #19  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:58 AM
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let's hope the Spec does some actual research (for possibly the first time in decades) and finds out the hundreds of millions in economic development spinoff that LRT can generate. NOW is the time for them, the Chamber, the city, the poverty groups and everyone else in town to join forces for one huge cause - surging our economy. Forget the transit aspect of this...the EcDev aspect is really incredible. City hall says that's their main focus. So does the Chamber and anyone else involved in this city (as it should be). This is our chance to take a transit system and have it revolutionize our lower city and suburban Upper James strip.
I'm going to push hard for LRT on both with the hopes that we at least get LRT on the east/west corridor.

It's time for letters to the editor people. you know the car-addicts will be out in full force like they have been lately with the one-way stuff.
Keep pumping EcDev numbers and stats....nobody can argue that stuff. And it's exactly what the Hammer needs.
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  #20  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2008, 2:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelTown View Post
Or just leave it and go with BRT for A-Line, which I say is 70% chance of happening. I would be super shocked if council approved LRT for A-Line.
The chances are good that it will be BRT for Upper James. But we all know how the city has big plans for the airport. Running LRT to the airport could potentially attract more business from the western GTA.
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