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  #761  
Old Posted May 24, 2011, 10:04 PM
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Can someone tell me what is the difference between a underground LRT and a subway line?
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  #762  
Old Posted May 24, 2011, 10:47 PM
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  #763  
Old Posted May 24, 2011, 11:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Can someone tell me what is the difference between a underground LRT and a subway line?
LRT has a lower capacity, but is cheaper to build.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
I honestly don't think that the sketch is very accurate. How would it be possible to fit all of those things in the existing space?

In the before image, there are 4 road lanes on the right side, 2 on the left for a total of 6, and a very small median separating the two directions. But in the after picture, they've managed to keep 4 of the 6 roads lanes, and turn 2 of them and the thin median into 2 streetcars lanes, a center sidewalk, a grass strip as wide as the current median on each side of the sidewalk, AND two strips of trees each as wide as the current median
There appears to be 3 lanes on each side plus a left-turn lane on the right and a narrow median, so 7.5 lanes basically. In the rendering 2 remain for cars on either side, so the LRT takes up 2 of the remaining 3.5 lanes (though these would also use up less space than a lane of auto traffic), leaving 1.5+ for the central median. Seems realistic enough to me.
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  #764  
Old Posted May 24, 2011, 11:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
I honestly don't think that the sketch is very accurate. How would it be possible to fit all of those things in the existing space?

In the before image, there are 4 road lanes on the right side, 2 on the left for a total of 6, and a very small median separating the two directions.
There are 3 on the left, not 2. Look at the intersection beyond: there are 4 lines of cars, the rightmost of which is turning right (the SUV). The perspective of the camera, and perhaps worn line painting, has made it difficult to discern the curb lane from the middle lane.

Quote:
But in the after picture, they've managed to keep 4 of the 6 roads lanes, and turn 2 of them and the thin median into 2 streetcars lanes, a center sidewalk, a grass strip as wide as the current median on each side of the sidewalk, AND two strips of trees each as wide as the current median

And added all of this without actually widening the road, since all the building show just as much space in front of them and still show a sidewalk on each side.

So where is the room for the center walkway, two grass strips, and two strips of trees coming from?
It's possible they did widen the road a bit. Look on the right of the original and there is a service road serving the houses. I get the impression that that service road has been narrowed (perhaps made one-lane?) and certainly the median/sidewalk (the thing the bus stop is on) separating it from the regular traffic lanes looks to be narrower.

Here's what it looks like in Streetview:
http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,92.81,,0,2.04

As you can see, the service road is two lanes wide - a regular lane and a dual-direction bikeway. The median separating it from Laurier proper is also quite wide, as the bus stop shows - it just happens to be sloped.

So let's do the math again and see how it works.

We've got 3 lanes per direction, plus a central median that's wider than 1 lane (1.5 lanes). We've also got a dual-direction bikeway occupying 1 lane, and the best part of another lane acting as a sidewalk and a sloped median separating the service road. That's a grand total of 8.5 lanes to work with.

The post-image shows 4 regular lanes and 2 tramway lanes, so we're down to 2.5 lanes for everything else. I think we can safely assume that the sidewalks, tree lines, grass (ok, wtf is with all that grass?) and bikeway could fit in 2 lanes, leaving half a lane for the median (which would have to be mainly sloped or a retaining wall) separating the service road.

While it works in this particular location, I wouldn't like to say for the rest of the corridor...
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  #765  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 2:26 AM
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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Can someone tell me what is the difference between a underground LRT and a subway line?
In Toronto's case: fare-paid zones vs honour fare. In other words, the Eglinton LRT will have a completely different fare policy than the current subway/RT system, making it functionally more akin to streetcars and buses than the subway/RT network.
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  #766  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 2:28 AM
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If the people in the houses on the right don't like it they can sell them for a lot of money to the developers who will want to build along the line.
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  #767  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 3:17 AM
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[IMG]If the people in the houses on the right don't like it they can sell them for a lot of money to the developers who will want to build along the line.
This part of town has been developping very rapidly in the last decade and the boulevard you see in the previous rendering is a vital link between the historical downtown and the bridges leading to Lévis (and Montréal). These bungalows should have been gone for a long time and many developpers have shown interest over the years, the most important of which is SSQ, an insurance company. They needed space to expand and planned to built highrises on this piece of land. Its headquarters is the grey building on the left hand side and they have been trying to buy all the houses on the Ilot Lapointe, which you can see here:


http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-soleil/...r-la-glace.php

The company began to quietly buy the houses and they had acquired 10 out of 33 houses when residents learned about it through NIMBYs who are particularly active and loud in Quebec City. Anyway, the owners obviously started to increase the price so much that a 70's bungalow asking price was now $800,000.00 (remember that we are in Quebec City, not Vancouver! ). Anyway, the company has ceased its acquisitions for now and the development of this "side of the road" is in a complete standstill.

I've posted this before (video of the planned tramway system in Quebec City). At about 1:55, you can see the road which is described in the rendering posted before.

Video Link
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  #768  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 4:25 AM
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Originally Posted by davidivivid View Post
This part of town has been developping very rapidly in the last decade and the boulevard you see in the previous rendering is a vital link between the historical downtown and the bridges leading to Lévis (and Montréal). These bungalows should have been gone for a long time and many developpers have shown interest over the years, the most important of which is SSQ, an insurance company. They needed space to expand and planned to built highrises on this piece of land. Its headquarters is the grey building on the left hand side and they have been trying to buy all the houses on the Ilot Lapointe, which you can see here:


http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-soleil/...r-la-glace.php

The company began to quietly buy the houses and they had acquired 10 out of 33 houses when residents learned about it through NIMBYs who are particularly active and loud in Quebec City. Anyway, the owners obviously started to increase the price so much that a 70's bungalow asking price was now $800,000.00 (remember that we are in Quebec City, not Vancouver! ). Anyway, the company has ceased its acquisitions for now and the development of this "side of the road" is in a complete standstill.
Haha

NIMBYs or not, sooner or later the locals are going to figure it out when houses keep getting bought by numbered companies or whatever that keep leasing the places out to renters.

The early railways had this exact kind of problem - as a railway company bought up land for a line, the remaining parcels that it hadn't yet acquired became inflated in value due solely to their location along the prospective line. To avoid this kind of thing preventing railways from being built, the government passed expropriation legislation that allowed the land to be acquired at its "normal" value. With all land along a corridor being expropriated simultaneously, there was no hold-out inflationary effect.

This kind of problem with respect to development is one of the reasons that Britain came up with its postwar Town Planning Act.
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  #769  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 9:42 PM
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Finally !!!!

Toronto Rockets add more elbow room for Y-U-S Subway riders, but long-term relief remains elusive

May 24, 2011 10:59 am | by Adam Hawkins | 8 Comments


After years of waiting, the new Toronto Rocket subway cars will enter service in just a few weeks, and they’re stuffed with new features designed to make riders’ lives easier. Articulations! Electronic maps! Bacteria-killing handholds!


New Toronto Rocket Subway Train, image by APTA-2048

Of course all of these bells and whistles are moot if you can’t squeeze onto the train. That’s why rush hour riders on the overcrowded Yonge side of the line should be especially excited about one of the Rocket’s less touted benefits: increased capacity.

The Rockets only have driver’s cabs at the front and back of the train, instead of one on every car. Combined with the additional room provided by the articulations, a packed Rocket train will hold about 10 per cent more people.

While that may not sound like nearly enough, the Rockets are just the first step toward major capacity improvements on the Yonge-University-Spadina line. Unfortunately the next steps are a whole lot steeper.

The TTC’s desire to run trains closer together on the 47 year-old line has opened up a pandora’s box of expensive projects. The trackside signalling system keeps trains too far apart, so it must be replaced with a computerized system. Long loading times at Yonge and Bloor create congestion, so the station must be renovated. The track layout at terminals causes delays when trains have to turn back; the Spadina extension will add a new, better-designed terminal while the Yonge side will need new tunnel past Finch just to improve turnaround times.

Once the TTC has fixed all three of these limitations they can reduce headways on the line and make the trains longer so that they take up the whole platform. However, none of these projects are fully funded and for now any capacity improvement is hypothetical. And it doesn’t stop there. These are just a few of the most prominent projects to add capacity on the line.

Meanwhile, condo construction is booming, the downtown office market is thriving, and the Eglinton LRT is a go. All of this will put further strain on Toronto’s most important transportation corridor. The TTC seems intent upon squeezing more and more downtown-bound passengers onto a single line, but they’re running up against fundamental design constraints at every turn.

The Downtown Relief Line (DRL) presents a much more straightforward alternative. The line would eliminate the need for additional capacity on Yonge by diverting huge volumes of traffic, especially from passengers coming from the east. In addition, the DRL would bring rapid transit access to new areas of the city and provide an alternate route to downtown during service disruptions. It’s more expensive, but it’s a solution that will provide Toronto with enough subway capacity for decades.





Read the rest of the article here:

http://www.urbantoronto.ca/news/2011...remains-elusiv
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  #770  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by gweed123 View Post
Big news on the LRT front today!

City Council approved a "fast track" of the LRT project to have a ceremonial opening in time for Canada's 150th Birthday in 2017, with a full opening in Spring 2018, a full year ahead of the original schedule. It should be interesting to see how this is going to play out.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Li...855/story.html
Movement on the Ottawa LRT
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  #771  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 10:51 PM
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Great day for Transit updates today:

Video Link
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  #772  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Can someone tell me what is the difference between a underground LRT and a subway line?
There is no easy answer to that question because subways or metros are a form of LRT. Light rail transit refers to the track gage; they may not always be the same but the gage is less then the standard Heavy rail gage. Street LRT gage must fit well in the traffic lane but many subways such as Montreal's are narrow as well. Metros and Subways run on LRT track with a third rail power supply on a designated rights of way, where as catenary wire's are used as the power supply for in street LRTs. There is a range of overlapping systems technology.
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  #773  
Old Posted May 25, 2011, 11:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Can someone tell me what is the difference between a underground LRT and a subway line?
There is no easy answer to that question because subways or metros are a form of LRT. Light rail transit refers to the track gage; they may not always be the same but the gage is less then the standard Heavy rail gage. Street LRT gage must fit well in the traffic lane but many subways such as Montreal's are narrow as well. Metros and Subways run on LRT track with a third rail power supply on a designated rights of way, where as catenary wire's are used as the power supply for in street LRTs. There is a range of overlapping systems technology.
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  #774  
Old Posted May 26, 2011, 1:44 AM
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Originally Posted by new age View Post
There is no easy answer to that question because subways or metros are a form of LRT. Light rail transit refers to the track gage; they may not always be the same but the gage is less then the standard Heavy rail gage.
Umm, most rail systems in North America use standard gauge, 4'8½" or 1435 mm. Toronto's subway and streetcar lines use a slightly larger gauge, 1495 mm, allegedly owing its existence to a fear dating back to the 19th century that mainline railway locomotives might try to head down Toronto's streets were its streetcar lines built to standard gauge.

In Europe, in particular Eastern Europe, narrower gauges are found on some tram systems, often as metre-gauge systems (3'3 3/8").
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  #775  
Old Posted May 26, 2011, 3:20 AM
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The STM has been on a roll lately:

The STM receives an International MetroRail Award

Montréal, March 16, 2011 – At the annual international MetroRail conference organized by Terrapinn and held this week in Milan, the Société de transport de Montréal (STM) had the honour of receiving the Special Merit Award for Commitment to the Environment for the second consecutive year. The STM was nominated along with Calgary Transit, Delhi Metro Rail Corporation, Los Angeles County Metropolitan, Seoul Metro, SMRT and Warsaw Metro. MetroRail brings together close to 300 delegates from some fifty metro operators around the world.

“The Special Merit Award for Commitment to the Environment underlines our commitment to sustainable development. The STM adopted a sustainable development policy in 2010 to facilitate the integration of this approach into its way of doing things. Furthermore, it successfully implemented its brand positioning, Society in Motion, by showing that taking public transit is a positive move for the environment,” declared Mr. Yves Devin, Director-General of the STM. “I am therefore very proud of this recognition by our peers, especially as it comes on top of the some twenty awards that we received last year!”

In September 2010, the STM signed the Charter on Sustainable Development launched by the International Association of Public Transport (UITP). This recognition supports the company’s sustainable development efforts and underlines its willingness to commit to implementing the Charter’s principles.

Finally, the Société also stands out for having published a sustainable development report detailing its principal achievements: http://stm.info/English/en-bref/a-rdd2009.pdf

STM wins American Public Transportation Association award
as Outstanding Public Transportation System in North America

Montréal, October 5, 2010 – As part of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), held in San Antonio, Texas, the Société de transport de Montréal (STM) received an award as Outstanding Public Transportation System in North America, for the excellent results it achieved between 2007 and 2009 in terms of effectiveness and efficiency.

The STM registered 382.8 million linked rides in 2009, some 19.5 million more than in 2006, a 5.4% growth rate. Its paratransit service for the disabled provided more than 2.4 million rides in 2009, a 16% increase over 2006. The overall satisfaction level of transit users also rose from 84% in 2006 to 86% in 2009. To achieve such results, the STM undertook a number of initiatives and increased its offer of service by 18.5% over 2006 levels.

The STM’s environmental efforts are rewarded by the international public transit industry

Montréal, March 30, 2010 – As part of the MetroRail international conference organized byTerrapinn in London last week, the STM received the Special Merit Award for Commitment to the Environment. This prestigious award recognizes, on the one hand, the STM’s leadership in the area of sustainable development and, on the other hand, the strategy that it has implemented to position public transit as a smart environmental choice for the population. Indeed, by using buses and the métro, clients are taking a green action and contributing directly to the reduction of GHGs.
This award confirms the effectiveness of the marketing communications program developed to promote services and to encourage the population to use them more often. By featuring messages such as “Un bus = 50 autos de moins sur la route”, “Un métro = 715 autos” and “Avec 350 nouveaux bus, c’est plus facile d’être vert”, the STM demonstrated vitality and innovation. Joining forces with partners such as Communauto, Bixi, Vélo-Québec and participating in various trip-generating events has created a real movement in favour of public transit.

The STM distinguished itself among 70 metro networks operating in 40 different countries. It was nominated along with Calgary Transit, Delhi Metro Rail Corporation, Seoul Metro, SMRT (Singapore) and the Warsaw metro.

The Montréal métro is the most productive in the world

Montréal, November 25, 2009 – With the release of the annual results of benchmarking studies among 27 metros around the world, carried out by the Imperial College London for the year 2008, the Société de transport de Montréal (STM) has learned that the performance of its métro network continues to improve year after year.

In fact, according to Mr. Richard J. Anderson, Director of the Railway and Transport Strategy Centre at the Imperial College London, “The STM distinguishes itself from its peers in several ways despite the fact that its métro cars are among the oldest in the world. On the one hand, the STM is ranked first in the area of workforce productivity, which is the highest in terms of train car-kilometres, and this at very low operating costs. Its rolling stock continues to display a high level of reliability, thus enabling the STM to deliver quality service to its clientele. The Montréal métro is also considered to have one of the smallest carbon footprints in the world. On the other hand, it must continue its efforts to develop new real-time customer information tools, expand its commercial revenues and increase employee training.”

http://www.stm.info/english/info/comm-11/a-ind-co11.htm
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  #776  
Old Posted May 26, 2011, 3:30 AM
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Movement on the Ottawa LRT
As an additional bonus, Ottawa's also thinking about extending the O-train south.

Quote:
Ottawa O-Train extension proposed
24 May 2011

CANADA: The Ottawa Transit Commission approved C$200 000 for a study into a southern O-Train extension to Leitrim Park & Ride and Riverside South at a meeting on May 18. The line would use the corridor designated for the proposed north-south LRT line that was scrapped by City of Ottawa Council in November 2006.
http://www.railwaygazette.com/nc/new...-proposed.html

So that means, both light rail and commuter rail are a go for the city.

Additionally, news on another transit front, electric buses.

Quote:
New Flyer, Mitsubishi working on electric transit bus
Winnipeg-based New Flyer Industries hopes to soon become a worldwide market leader in the sale of fully electric buses.

The bus manufacturer, which already makes hybrid and fuel cell buses, is now in the process of developing an electric transit bus in conjunction with Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

The bus should be ready for testing within a year and might run a regular Winnipeg Transit route toward the end of its testing phase.
http://www.winnipegsun.com/2011/04/2...ic-transit-bus
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  #777  
Old Posted May 26, 2011, 3:55 AM
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Open house visitors nix Nose Creek valley C-Trains

Quote:
Open house visitors nix Nose Creek valley C-Trains

BY JASON MARKUSOFF,
CALGARY HERALD
MAY 25, 2011 9:26 PM


Running C-Trains down the unpopulated Nose Creek valley is proving to be the least popular Calgary Transit idea since the $3 park-and-ride fee.

That charge has been axed, and the long-proposed valley alignment for the future north-central LRT line seems on its way out too, given Calgarians’ response to the option at an open house Tuesday.

The public preference is clearly one of the other two dotted lines strung on transit planners’ maps: one option down Centre Street, the other along Edmonton Trail.

...
Full Article

Open housers basically proving what most of us on SSP think... that the Nose Creek alignment was a stupid idea.
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  #778  
Old Posted May 26, 2011, 4:07 AM
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For those unfamiliar with northern Calgary, here's an image from my blog that shows a portion of two of the alignments. The Nose Creek alignment being pushed by transit planners is in green, a possible Centre Street subway alignment that transit advocates are pushing is in orange.



<--N ~ S-->

The Eau Claire subway station at the southern end of the Centre Street line would already be there from the Southeast LRT.
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  #779  
Old Posted May 26, 2011, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Can someone tell me what is the difference between a underground LRT and a subway line?
Remembering that subways came first, the construction at the time was more akin to normal train technology at the time which was quite heavy and robust (hence heavy rail). When LRT was developed, one of the major differences was the much lighter-weight construction of the vehicles compared to most subway systems (hence light rail). Since then, newer subway vehicles have been constructed to be lighter weight like LRT; however, we still use the terms heavy rail and light rail to denote the associated difference in capacity.
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  #780  
Old Posted May 26, 2011, 12:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by new age View Post
There is no easy answer to that question because subways or metros are a form of LRT. Light rail transit refers to the track gage; they may not always be the same but the gage is less then the standard Heavy rail gage. Street LRT gage must fit well in the traffic lane but many subways such as Montreal's are narrow as well. Metros and Subways run on LRT track with a third rail power supply on a designated rights of way, where as catenary wire's are used as the power supply for in street LRTs. There is a range of overlapping systems technology.
Not all heavy rail metro/subways operate on third rail - some operate on catenary (such as all the heavy rail lines in the Shanghai Metro and many other lines in other Chinese metro systems)
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