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  #61  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2008, 11:46 PM
jayrod19 jayrod19 is offline
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not sure too many of you know about this site, but it tells you about all of the economic development and what not in every region of Saskatchewan.

http://www.ei.gov.sk.ca/Economic-News
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  #62  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2008, 12:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayrod19 View Post
not sure too many of you know about this site, but it tells you about all of the economic development and what not in every region of Saskatchewan.

http://www.ei.gov.sk.ca/Economic-News
Good find, development summaries for Saskatchewan towns and cities.

So much information
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  #63  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2008, 3:25 PM
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A new $15 million retirement village (Caleb Village) is under construction in Kindersley. It is either 93 units or 110...and is to open either this fall or next spring. There are discrepancies between the two links.
I really dislike the two double car garages on the townhouse portion (Rosedale Estates) of the project. It makes for a real ugly streetscape. Not a bad project for Kindersley though.

http://www.calebgroup.ca/kindersley.htm
http://www.kindersley.ca/documents/CalebVillage.pdf

Thanks for posting the "economic" link jayrod 19.

There is also a $4.2 million Co-op carwash/c-store/gas bar under construction and a new $2.7 million water tower in the planning stages.
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  #64  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2008, 7:14 AM
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One of my favorite Manitoba communities .. Gimli, Manitoba is the site of a 8 building lakefront condo complex.

The Golden Circle

Source: mls.ca

Plus the West Point Condo.
http://www.westpointcondos.ca/index.html
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  #65  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2008, 8:16 PM
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New boundaries for Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authorities (SREDA).

EDIT: Sharing some calculations...

- Combined population of specified regions is 934,248, representing a geographic area of 329,800 sq. km.
- Population density of 2.83/sq. km.
- Highest: Saskatoon region at 27.82/sq. km; Regina region at 12.92/sq. km
- City of Saskatoon has a population of 202,340 (2006) occupying an area of 144 sq. km, density is 1,405/sq. km
- City of Regina has a population of 179,246 (2006) occupying an area of 118.87 sq. km, density is 1,508/sq. km
- Lowest: Mid Sask West at .86/sq. km; followed by South West region at .89/sq. km.

Conclusion: Outside of the two largest cities, the province of Saskatchewan is sparsely populated. Agriculture is the primary land use...the world's breadbasket.



Quote:
NEW ENTERPRISE REGIONS ANNOUNCED

Regional economic development in Saskatchewan is undergoing major changes with the launch of the new Enterprise Region program in the southern part of the province. As well, the province is doubling its investment in economic development by providing the new enterprise regions an additional $2.5 million for a total budget of $5 million.

"We are today launching the Enterprise Region program to enhance regional economic development in Saskatchewan with a focus on business, industry and competitiveness," Enterprise and Innovation Minister Lyle Stewart said. "REDA has made a significant contribution to the provincial economy over the last 15 years, and we want to build on that success in these new high-performance regions."

A REDA working group have been working on a new model of regional economic development over the past three years and made recommendations to the government about having larger regions based on commutershed information (where people live and work), and natural boundaries such as rivers and road patterns.

"This is an exciting time for Saskatchewan's economy, and we recognize the important role economic development groups play in attracting investment," Stewart said. "With a focus on increasing business and being more competitive, we are confident all stakeholders in the regions will be able to realize more of their economic potential under this new program."

Ministry staff will be consulting with REDAs over the coming months to finalize program details. Work has already started between interested stakeholders to create new partnerships within each region. Facilitators will be available to the new regions as they work through the process.

There will also be additional re-organization in the northern part of the province, with details to be announced at a later date. The current REDA program will officially wind down as of March 31, 2009.
-30-
For more information, contact:
Deb Young
Enterprise and Innovation
Regina
Phone: (306) 787-6315
Email: Deb.Young@gov.sk.ca
Source


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  #66  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2008, 5:27 AM
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Sask. First Nation announces wind power project
Last Updated: Tuesday, August 12, 2008 | 4:06 PM CT Comments7 Recommend9
CBC News

A Saskatchewan First Nation is getting into the wind power business.

Beardy's and Okemasis First Nation, located about 90 kilometres northeast of Saskatoon, plans to develop a 100-megawatt wind farm in the rural municipality of Big Quill.

The First Nation is partnering on the project with SkyPower, a Toronto wind power company.

Beardy's and Ogemais Chief Rick Gamble said the project will provide local benefits, including job training programs and employment for locals.

It will also have a positive impact on local tourism, he said.

"The proposed development will be an important driver of local economic development for years to come," Gamble said in a news release Monday.

The partners said in the release that the project will be built on 12,000 acres of land and when completed, will generate clean energy sufficient to power more than 30,000 homes.

Construction of the Willow Cree wind project could start as early as 2010, the partners said. The cost of the project wasn't disclosed.

Saskatchewan has three other wind farms in the southwest region.

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  #67  
Old Posted Aug 19, 2008, 8:39 AM
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Construction begins on new health facility
Saskatchewan News Network; Regina Leader-Post
Published: Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Dignitaries proudly dug into a patch of ground Monday at a ceremony marking the official start of construction on the Humboldt District Health Complex.

The $40-million facility is expected to open in 2010 with 34 acute-care beds, two of which will be dedicated to obstetrics.

The complex is expected to give patients from the area access to ambulatory outpatient care, emergency services, diagnostic imaging, day surgeries, therapies, chemotherapy and visiting specialists, according to a news release issued by the province.

The complex will also serve as a base for the delivery of community health services such as home care, addictions counselling and mental health services.

The Ministry of Health is the primary funding source for the capital project, providing $26 million toward the total cost of construction. Donations collected by the St. Elizabeth's Foundation, combined with contributions from 29 municipalities in the area, will add $13.3 million. The Saskatoon Health Region has dedicated another $3.2 million.

The existing Humboldt District Hospital will remain open until the new facility is ready, and then is slated for demolition.

"Humboldt and area residents have waited a long time for this to come," said Social Services Minister Donna Harpauer, who serves as MLA for Humboldt.

"This new health complex will provide improved access to health-care services for a growing community."


© The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2008

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Another First Nations group proposing to develop a wind power project

First Nations eye wind power
Trevor Newell, Saskatchewan News Network; Regina Leader-Post
Published: Tuesday, August 19, 2008

REGINA -- As a result of an agreement signed Monday, there could soon be a new crop of windmills springing up on the Saskatchewan prairie.

All Nations Energy Developments Corp., which is owned by the Cowessess and George Gordon First Nations, signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Calgary-based TransAlta Corp. to develop a proposed 100-megawatt wind farm, which could be located on the Cowessess First Nation.

Grady Lerat, who sits on the All Nations Energy board of directors, said Monday's announcement was the result of more than three years of work by members of the First Nations, who've been studying ways to get involved in cost-effective, green energy production.

"Right now, I think wind energy is a viable product and I think it's cleaner for the environment, for sure," he said, referring to other methods of electricity production, such as coal-fired generators that carry pollution concerns.

Lerat said the project could provide the partner First Nations with additional financial resources, as well as valuable vocational opportunities for their young people.

"It gives us, I guess, a bigger capacity to help our students who are in universities and high schools to start working on science programs to further their development in that area. Over the next decade or so, we're going to need -- and all of Saskatchewan in general is going to need -- a lot of individuals who are up to speed on engineering and the other sciences," he said.

Lerat cautioned that a lot of work remains to be done before the proposed wind farm is operational -- notably securing a power-purchase agreement from SaskPower and finalizing plans for the optimal placement of the windmills, which calls for further study of both the existing electrical infrastructure and wind patterns -- but he said the MOU is a great start.

"It's a win-win for all parties," he said.

Jason Edworthy of TransAlta also said the MOU was a significant milestone in the development of the project, which is expected to take another two years to complete.

"Now that we have the (MOU), we're busy rolling up our sleeves and getting to work on all the plans that we need," he said.

Edworthy said TransAlta has been involved with other wind farms in Canada of similar size to that proposed in Monday's agreement. He said 100-megawatt farms are cost-effective ways to produce power.

"I think that's about the right size to make things economical and it tends to be the kind of size that fits into existing utility infrastructures reasonably easily," he said.

To produce 100 megawatts, Edworthy said the project could mean the construction of 30 to 35 80-metre-high towers, each housing three blades which turn in a circle with a 90-metre diameter. The cost to complete the project, which is to be covered by All Nations Energy and TransAlta, could range between $250 million and $300 million.

© The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2008

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  #68  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2008, 6:33 PM
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Curious, but it might just work, dagnabbit...

Canal announcement expected next week
SP Services
Published: Friday, August 22, 2008

Wakaw's watery dream appears to be about to come to fruition.

Provincial Environment Minister Nancy Heppner will be in the town next Thursday on behalf of Premier Brad Wall to make an announcement on the Wakaw canal.

A proposal to build a one-kilometre canal to link Wakaw lake to the town as part of a multi-million dollar resort development dates back to the late 1990s. Calls to the town office were not returned Thursday afternoon.

Town Coun. Steve Skowodro said he could not comment on the announcement, but said it's good news for the area.

In 2005, the canal was priced at $1.14 million.

The total project involved a hotel-spa-convention centre, golf course and marina and hinged on the participation of a private developer.

The total price tag at the time was $60 million, but there has been significant inflation around capital costs in recent years.

According to the project's business plan, the development is expected to provide roughly 200 direct jobs within the community and 300 indirect jobs in the surrounding area.

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  #69  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2008, 1:57 AM
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It's no Okotoks, but certainly deserving of interest.

Here comes the sun
Darren Bernhardt, The StarPhoenix
Published: Friday, August 29, 2008

An entire residential development to be built south of Saskatoon will be powered by the sun.

The eco-friendly community, called Suncastle Park, will feature seven homes designed to harness solar energy to power the electrical, heat and hot water needs. The bright idea is the brainchild of Angie Ortlepp, owner of Pike Lake-based Suncatcher Solar Homes.

"This is the first of its kind in the province," she said. "A lot of people are talking about building passive solar communities, but nobody is actually doing what we are doing."


Angie Ortlepp is introducing Saskatchewan's first grid-tied solar development. Named Sandcastle Park and located 30 km south of Saskatoon, the seven homes on the site will draw their electrical and heating supply from solar panels, with SaskPower providing backup
Gord Waldner, The StarPhoenix


The concept behind passive solar energy is to literally let the sun do the work. Houses are oriented to the south with rooftop panels and a wall of windows that enable a thermal mass such as a concrete floor or stone wall to absorb heat during the day and radiate it at night.

It's a big step designed to leave a tiny carbon footprint. The idea is to live as natural with the environment as possible, which means no bulldozing the rolling hills, wild brush and hollows of the natural prairie landscape.

"We want to work with the land, which provides lots of opportunity for walkout basements," said Ortlepp, whose company earlier this year installed one of the country's largest solar hot water systems in the Confederation Inn.

That system is predicted to save energy costs of $300,000 over 25 years and reduce carbon emissions by 29 tonnes during that time.

Located adjacent to Pike Lake Provincial Park, Suncastle Park's lot sizes vary from 1.06 acres to 1.78 acres with prices ranging from $104,000 to $143,000. Included with each lot is an installed, two-kilowatt solar power system that provides enough power to run all standard kitchen appliances and entertainment units.

The system can be expanded to include more solar panels, wind turbines or geothermal energy, said Ortlepp.

The lots will still be tied into the SaskPower grid as a backup. On a sunny day, the solar panels will produce more electricity than is required, so the extra power will flow back into the grid, making the electrical meter run backward.

At night or on cloudy days, SaskPower will supply the electrical needs of the home. The homeowner will pay only for the difference between the power supplied by SaskPower and the power produced by the solar panels.

Residents of Suncastle Park will also benefit from a rebate provided by the Saskatchewan government for grid-tied renewable power systems. After the home is complete and the solar power system installed, a cheque of about $6,000, which represents 25 per cent of the value of the system, will be mailed out.

"Grid-tied solar and wind power systems benefit everyone," said Ortlepp. "They benefit you because you are saving on your energy bills and they benefit others because you are making clean renewable power available to everyone who is connected to the grid.

"If everyone had solar panels on their roof we would need fewer central power stations. Suncastle Park is our contribution . . . towards making Saskatchewan a cleaner, brighter place to live."

© The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2008

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  #70  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2008, 12:17 AM
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P.A. plan targets poor neighbourhood
West Flat area listed as priority for redevelopment
Charlene Tebbutt, The StarPhoenix
Published: Tuesday, September 02, 2008

PRINCE ALBERT -- Officials have big plans for Prince Albert during the next 20 years, including redevelopment of one of the city's poorest neighbourhoods.

A recently completed city plan outlines a number of infrastructure projects aimed at making Prince Albert an economic sensation within Saskatchewan. Plan Prince Albert sets out future direction of the city's residential, commercial and industrial areas, along with opportunities in areas such as health, education, transportation, recreation and housing.

"To facilitate long-term planning, the City has designated enough residential, commercial and industrial land to accommodate projected development in each sector for the next 25 years," the 200-plus page planning document states.

"In 20 years Prince Albert will be . . . a regional hub of Saskatchewan known for its innovation and diverse employment, retail and service opportunities."

Plan Prince Albert has been in the works since 2005. An updated community plan is required by law. The last community plan in Prince Albert dates back to 1987.

Among the plan's priorities are redevelopment of the city's West Flat area, a mainly low-income neighbourhood featuring a number of unpaved roads, unkempt homes and only a handful of convenience stores and gas stations. The area has long been pegged locally as one of the worst in the city for crime, drug and alcohol abuse and violence.

The West Flat area was listed as a priority for redevelopment during public consultation meetings, according to the document. The report recommends making the West Flat one of the city's development "hubs," with updated infrastructure and servicing, which would also provide incentives for private funding.

The West Flat is an important part of the city's growth, the plan adds, as it contains the largest population of all other neighbourhoods and has a high number of children and youth.

"What happens in the West Flat will affect the future of Prince Albert," the report adds.

Dawn Robins, executive director of the West Flat Citizens' Group, said the area has long been neglected by city administration. While the current city council seems supportive of growth in the area, past leaders haven't made it a priority, she said.

And with little pride coming from civic leaders, it's tough to generate pride among residents.

"You lead by example," Robins added.

The area is desperately in need of more affordable housing and transportation. Access to medical services and grocery stores is also an issue.

Still, there has been some change, Robins noted. Residents who previously put up with poor living conditions now have better housing thanks to increased bylaw enforcement of rental properties. And while youth continue to succumb to the influence of gangs, drugs, violence and suicide, Robins said it won't hurt to try revamping the neighbourhood.

"I hope they start here so we can be part of the change," she said.

Mayor Jim Scarrow said the West Flat has always been an economically challenged area. He said the city is addressing transportation, health and food security issues, but noted that much-needed services such as grocery stores and doctor's offices will only thrive if they are supported by local residents.

He said the West Flat is in transition, although there still are areas you "wouldn't take tourists to."

"At the heart of it all . . . you'll see a community with still lots of community pride," Scarrow said.

"Luckily, it didn't bottom out."

The West Flat is also benefiting from a plan to build a multimillion-dollar soccer centre in the area, as well as some 7,700 future residential homes.

"It's the next big area," Scarrow added.

The West Flat will be one of the first to undergo a focused neighbourhood and community review, said Joan Corneil, the city's director of economic development and planning. The city's economic growth has already led to the renovation of a number of dilapidated homes.

Lyn Brown, executive director of the Prince Albert and District Chamber of Commerce, said the chamber is happy to see the city set out future goals. However, she said the plan doesn't go far enough and needs more detailed information about how and when each goal will be met.

"We believe there needs to be more work and a clear action strategy," Brown said.

"It needs to be more measurable and more clear."

Brown said the chamber will continue to talk with the city during the next few weeks to follow up on more details of the plan. She said she wants to see it put into action.

"I certainly don't want to see it sitting on a shelf somewhere," she added.

The plan is set to come to Prince Albert city council on Sept. 8 for a public hearing.

© The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2008

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  #71  
Old Posted Sep 3, 2008, 9:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SASKFTW View Post
It's no Okotoks, but certainly deserving of interest.

Here comes the sun
Darren Bernhardt, The StarPhoenix
Published: Friday, August 29, 2008

...Suncastle Park is our contribution . . . towards making Saskatchewan a cleaner, brighter place to live."

© The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2008

Source
I think this will serve as a great demonstration project for the technology, but the location is a huge drawback. Since this is esentially an isolated acreage community, presumeably many of the residents will offset the environmental benefit by commuting to the city for work, and since they will be driving on rural roads, they will of course want SUVs (you don;t see a lot of smart cars or transit on the existing acreage communities). I hope I am being unnecessarily cynical (e.g. maybe all the residents will be home based workers), but I doubt it. Why not buy a swath of land in Pleasant Hill where the land is cheap and build them there? Or even in one of the existing suburbs, which at least give some hope of alternative transportation being used.
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  #72  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2008, 4:39 AM
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Latest from the Star Phoenix.

Humboldt receives funding for high school
The StarPhoenix
Published: Friday, September 05, 2008
Humboldt received $15 million in funding for a new high school Thursday.

The project is expected to cost $25 million, with the Horizon school division and Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools covering the remaining funds.

The new Humboldt Collegiate Institute is still in the planning stages, with plans to start construction in 2009.

The funding is part of the government of Saskatchewan's Ready for Growth program. The program has committed $117.6 million for K-12 school capital, said a news release.

The money is going toward major projects -- such as new schools in Humboldt, Porcupine Plain, Prince Albert, La Ronge and elsewhere -- as well as upgrades and renovations to schools across the province
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  #73  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2008, 1:31 AM
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Here is a link to Kindersley's new $2.7 million dollar water tower. The site includes a video link showing the tank being raised up the shaft of the tower. Apparently it took 3 hours.

http://kindersley.ca/KindersleysNewWaterTower.php
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  #74  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2008, 7:18 AM
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Another significant federal funding annoucement was recently made for the Port of Churchill. Upgrades to the port facilities.

Once the province upgardes the rail lines, and finalizes the plans for a northern highway we should start seeing more and more developments in the area.
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  #75  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2008, 7:22 AM
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New engines make tracks
By: Larry Kusch

Updated: September 6 at 09:01 AM CDT



OmniTRAX is spending $3.5 million to upgrade its locomotive fleet on the Hudson Bay Railroad in northern Manitoba.

On Monday, the company will unveil the first of 10 new reconditioned late-model Electro Motive SD50M locomotives at a noon-hour ceremony in The Pas. The rest of the units will be put into service over the next month.

"These are higher horsepower, more fuel efficient, better operating for our employees (and) have greater tractive power," Mike Ogborn, OmniTRAX's managing director, said.

"Over time, when we get them all in place, it means the ability to handle more tonnage, more efficiently," he said.

OmniTRAX owns and operates the Port of Churchill and the 1,300-kilometre rail line leading to it from The Pas.

The new locomotives represent the second significant investment by the company in the past year to its northern rail service.

Last October, OmniTRAX, along with the federal and provincial governments, pledged to invest $60 million in rail line upgrades and $8 million in port infrastructure improvements over five years. Each party is picking up one third of the cost.

The new more environmentally friendly locomotives will replace ancient Alco engines originally owned by CP Rail that were at least 30 years old, Ogborn said.

"These 10 will be the cornerstone of our fleet," he said.

The purchase brings the company's locomotive fleet to 32. It had been leasing locomotive power as it waited for the new engines.

Ogborn said all 10 new bright green locomotives will be named, with the first to be called 'Nanuk,' in recognition of the significance of the polar bear to northerners.

larry.kusch@freepress.mb.ca
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  #76  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2008, 8:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newflyer View Post
New engines make tracks
By: Larry Kusch

Updated: September 6 at 09:01 AM CDT



OmniTRAX is spending $3.5 million to upgrade its locomotive fleet on the Hudson Bay Railroad in northern Manitoba.

On Monday, the company will unveil the first of 10 new reconditioned late-model Electro Motive SD50M locomotives at a noon-hour ceremony in The Pas. The rest of the units will be put into service over the next month.

"These are higher horsepower, more fuel efficient, better operating for our employees (and) have greater tractive power," Mike Ogborn, OmniTRAX's managing director, said.

"Over time, when we get them all in place, it means the ability to handle more tonnage, more efficiently," he said.

OmniTRAX owns and operates the Port of Churchill and the 1,300-kilometre rail line leading to it from The Pas.

The new locomotives represent the second significant investment by the company in the past year to its northern rail service.

Last October, OmniTRAX, along with the federal and provincial governments, pledged to invest $60 million in rail line upgrades and $8 million in port infrastructure improvements over five years. Each party is picking up one third of the cost.

The new more environmentally friendly locomotives will replace ancient Alco engines originally owned by CP Rail that were at least 30 years old, Ogborn said.

"These 10 will be the cornerstone of our fleet," he said.

The purchase brings the company's locomotive fleet to 32. It had been leasing locomotive power as it waited for the new engines.

Ogborn said all 10 new bright green locomotives will be named, with the first to be called 'Nanuk,' in recognition of the significance of the polar bear to northerners.

larry.kusch@freepress.mb.ca
Good news as the Engines they used were really old. I have been on this railway between Thompson and Churchill. Actually read this in the Free Press later in the night.
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  #77  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2008, 2:50 AM
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Thunder Bay's previous mayor, Ken Bochcoff (now MP for TBay-Rainy River) opposed the existence of Churchill, and I'm pretty sure he petitioned to have the place shut down.

Good to see investment going there though, with the Canadian Internal Waters () becoming ice free in the future, it will become increasingly important.
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  #78  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2008, 3:54 AM
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Originally Posted by vid View Post
Thunder Bay's previous mayor, Ken Bochcoff (now MP for TBay-Rainy River) opposed the existence of Churchill, and I'm pretty sure he petitioned to have the place shut down.

Good to see investment going there though, with the Canadian Internal Waters () becoming ice free in the future, it will become increasingly important.
Well i suppose the next thing would be attack the polar bears, like they're arnt any there
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  #79  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2008, 1:50 PM
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not exactly development news, but thought i'd post this anyways
http://www.discoverweyburn.com/index...4550&Itemid=53

Quote:
Souris Valley Building Set to be Demolished PDF Print E-mail
It's hard to believe Weyburn without the Souris Valley Building.

By the end of next year, it will become a reality.

The city approving the tender for the building to be demolished at last night's city council meeting.

Weyburn Mayor Debra Button says it's a sad day for the city, but with the cost of $50 million to restore it, demolishing the building has to be done.

Button adding the city would like to see some sort of memorial built for the Souris Valley Building.

Button says the tender for the demolishment of the building is over $4 million with the company planning to have Souris Valley completely demolished by December 31st of next year.
it's crappy that something couldn't have been done to restore it, but i guess it has to be done. I'll have some photos of the building soon and i'll post em.
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Old Posted Sep 25, 2008, 4:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayM View Post
Well i suppose the next thing would be attack the polar bears, like they're arnt any there
Environmentalists have said that the decline in ice forming on the Hudson Bay will see the polar bears migrate north.
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