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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 6:10 PM
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How many cities in the US have at least one subway station?

Seriously , I'm curious . Could a top 20 be made? Obviously New York would be on top.
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 6:20 PM
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Does it have to be underground or are you talking about heavy rail only?
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 6:30 PM
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I guess You mean municipalities. I think most systems runs within a single city or municipality, as New York. But Washington goes by some different municipalities, the same as BART, And I think Atlanta. PATH in NY-NJ runs within four municipalities, I think, and PATCO between Philadelphia and NJ also goes by some different municipalities.

Here is a Wikipedia list where You can find all United States systems and find out the ubication of the stations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...s_by_ridership
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 6:48 PM
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We can do this. Here are the 50 largest urbanized areas.

Code:
US URBANIZED AREA	SUBWAY STOPS?

New York		Y, multiple lines
Los Angeles		Y, multiple lines
Chicago			Y, multilpe lines
Miami-Ft Laud.		-
Philadelphia		Y, multiple lines

Dallas			Y, 1 station
Houston			-
Washington		Y, multiple lines
Atlanta			Y, multiple lines
Boston			Y, multiple lines

Detroit			-
Phoenix			-
San Francisco-Oakland	Y, multiple lines
Seattle			Y, 5 stations
San Diego		Y, 1 station

Minneapolis-St Paul	Y, 1 station
Tampa-St Pete		-
Denver			-
Baltimore		Y, 1 line
St Louis		Y, 4 stations
	
San Juan		Y, 2 stations
Riverside-San Bern.	-
Las Vegas		-
Portland		Y, 1 station
Cleveland		Y, 2 stations

San Antonio		-
Pittsburgh		Y, 1 line
Sacramento		-
San Jose		-
Cincinnati		Abandoned, 1 line

Kansas City		-
Orlando			-
Indianpolis		-
Virginia Beach		-
Milwaukee		-

Columbus		-
Austin			-
Charlotte		-
Providence		-
Jacksonville		-

Memphis			-
Salt Lake City		-
Louisville		-
Nashville		-
Richmond		-

Buffalo			Y, 1 line
Hartford		-
Bridgeport-Stamford	-
New Orleans		-
Raleigh			-
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  #5  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 6:55 PM
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There are probably a few extra ghost stations underground as well.
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  #6  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCs77 View Post
I guess You mean municipalities. I think most systems runs within a single city or municipality, as New York. But Washington goes by some different municipalities, the same as BART, And I think Atlanta. PATH in NY-NJ runs within four municipalities, I think, and PATCO between Philadelphia and NJ also goes by some different municipalities.

Here is a Wikipedia list where You can find all United States systems and find out the ubication of the stations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...s_by_ridership
That list leaves off heavy rail Metra


Metra (reporting mark METX) is the commuter rail division of the Regional Transportation Authority of the Chicago metropolitan area. Metropolitan Rail Corporation or Metra operates 241 stations on 11 different rail lines. Throughout the 21st century, it has been at least the fourth busiest commuter rail system in the United States by ridership. Experiencing a 1.7% decline in ridership from the previous year, Metra trains offered 81.3 million passenger rides in 2012.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metra


Which would rank 7th. Or if combined with the L rank second.
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  #7  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
We can do this. Here are the 50 largest urbanized areas.

[code]
US URBANIZED AREA SUBWAY STOPS?
...
Also, Newark has a subway and there are subway PATH stops in places like Jersey City. I'm not familiar enough with PATH or New Jersey to name any other cities that might have one underground PATH station, though. Also, technically Cambridge is distinct from Boston, so depending on the criteria both that and Somerville could be separately listed, as well as places like Arlington, Virginia and Oakland, California.

In addition to those, Miami, Detroit and Las Vegas each have at least one line of sort of elevated, grade-separated, not-a-bus transportation that might be included if "subway" was used as shorthand for "metro-style service" and not meant to mean literally underground.
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  #8  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 8:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emathias View Post
Also, Newark has a subway and there are subway PATH stops in places like Jersey City. I'm not familiar enough with PATH or New Jersey to name any other cities that might have one underground PATH station, though. Also, technically Cambridge is distinct from Boston, so depending on the criteria both that and Somerville could be separately listed, as well as places like Arlington, Virginia and Oakland, California.

In addition to those, Miami, Detroit and Las Vegas each have at least one line of sort of elevated, grade-separated, not-a-bus transportation that might be included if "subway" was used as shorthand for "metro-style service" and not meant to mean literally underground.
If you mean "heavy rail" rather than actual underground stops, then Miami's metrorail has stops in Miami, Coral Gables, South Miami, Hialeah and Medley (along with Unincorporated Miami-Dade County).
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  #9  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 9:18 PM
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Louisiana station on the SE line in Denver feels sort of like a subway station. Part of the platform is beneath an underpass and you go down stairs from a street level plaza. Aside from the fact it's next to a giant freeway that's a really nice little urban corner actually.

I know it doesn't count though. I just felt like posting because when I rode the line I thought it was in fact underground and did not realize it wasn't until I just glanced at Google Maps.

I'm trying to think if any other ambiguous cases exist.

Last edited by llamaorama; Apr 10, 2014 at 9:33 PM.
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 10:02 PM
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My list is urbanized areas, not incorporated cities (because incorporated cities are meaningless), and not transit agencies (because some cities have consolidated regional agencies and some don't).

And it's for underground rail stations, regardless of heavy/light/whatever. An underground light rail station counts, but an elevated heavy rail one does not.

Others are of course free to make separate lists using separate methods, if they prefer.
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  #11  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 11:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brickell View Post
Does it have to be underground or are you talking about heavy rail only?
It could be light rail or heavy.
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  #12  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 11:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bnk View Post
That list leaves off heavy rail Metra


Metra (reporting mark METX) is the commuter rail division of the Regional Transportation Authority of the Chicago metropolitan area. Metropolitan Rail Corporation or Metra operates 241 stations on 11 different rail lines. Throughout the 21st century, it has been at least the fourth busiest commuter rail system in the United States by ridership. Experiencing a 1.7% decline in ridership from the previous year, Metra trains offered 81.3 million passenger rides in 2012.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metra


Which would rank 7th. Or if combined with the L rank second.

That is because Metra, as that extract forma Wikipedia says, is considered commuter rail. In Chicago, the system considered as urban heavy rail AKA metro (which is a better word that subway since can be either subway, elevated or at ground level)

Here is the list of commuter rail systems in the US

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...s_by_ridership
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  #13  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 11:21 PM
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You mean ANY underground rail station in ANY city?

So like Union City, NJ counts, because the light rail stations are underground?
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  #14  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 11:34 PM
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^ i was just wondering that, if so its going to be the same for seattle too.
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  #15  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 11:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
You mean ANY underground rail station in ANY city?

So like Union City, NJ counts, because the light rail stations are underground?
The OP already answered your question: "It could be light rail or heavy."
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  #16  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2014, 11:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xing View Post
It could be light rail or heavy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
You mean ANY underground rail station in ANY city?

So like Union City, NJ counts, because the light rail stations are underground?
Yeah, it is not clear what You really mean.
By subway stations do you mean any rail station, either heavy, light or commuter ubicated on an underground or subterranean level?

And what do you mean by cities, is it municipalities or metropolitan areas?

As crawford said, there is an underground light rail station in Union City that could be considered either on that city, as a separate entity or in metropolitan New York. Also PATH Have some underground and some elevated stations. If You also include commuter rail, then I think that Penn Station could be considered as such, since it is located underground, as millenium station in Chicago is.
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  #17  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2014, 12:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCs77 View Post
Yeah, it is not clear what You really mean.
By subway stations do you mean any rail station, either heavy, light or commuter ubicated on an underground or subterranean level?

And what do you mean by cities, is it municipalities or metropolitan areas?

As crawford said, there is an underground light rail station in Union City that could be considered either on that city, as a separate entity or in metropolitan New York. Also PATH Have some underground and some elevated stations. If You also include commuter rail, then I think that Penn Station could be considered as such, since it is located underground, as millenium station in Chicago is.
Those are all valid questions, as in I wasn't laying out a whole lot of rules to the list.

I simply mean a form of rapid rail transit that is underground and connected within a region. So for instance, you could consider New York's Subway system as one , and Path in New Jersey another. There are always variables that make it perplexing to ponder up a list. So make your own list, with your own rules. This isn't a super serious question.

In my own mind, I would consider St Louis' Metrolink one city's system with 4 subway stations, despite the fact that it goes through various other suburban cities in Illinois and Missouri. It's all run by the same agency.
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  #18  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2014, 3:08 AM
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Miami doesn't have any "Underground" stations at all.
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  #19  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2014, 3:07 PM
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The systems with at least one station underground would be, as far as I know


-New York Area
Subway
PATH
Hudson Bergen Light Rail
-Chicago Area
El
Metra commuter
-Philadelphia area
Subway
PATCO
-San Francisco area
BART
Muni Metro
-Boston
-Los Angeles
-Washington
-Atlanta
-Baltimore
-Pittsburgh
-Cleveland
-Saint Louis
-Minneapolis
-Seattle
-Portland
-Dallas

I could have some left.

To calculate how many stations in each system are underground could be pretty difficult (good luck with New York) in other cases just one or two stations are underground.
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  #20  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2014, 8:14 PM
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Cincinnati has four subway stations that are currently being used by Casper, Slimer, and George Burns.
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