HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum.

Since 1999, SkyscraperPage.com's forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web.  The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics.  SkyscraperPage.com also features unique skyscraper diagrams, a database of construction activity, and publishes popular skyscraper posters.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2009, 3:25 PM
deja vu's Avatar
deja vu deja vu is offline
truth > facts ~ F.L.W.
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 188
Brutalist Buildings in Your Region

Edited and links updated 12/29/2010:

Brutalism: Sculptural, geometric, massive urban playgrounds made of concrete, places where skateboarding would be a blast (and probably banned), or smaller-scale exercises in form and space. Since brutalism's heyday in the 1960's and 1970's, Pittsburgh has seen a rich variety of brutalist structures go up, and I'm interested in how many buildings of this type exist in other cities, especially new projects. Please post images of your favorites (or least favorites).

I'll get the ball rolling with my school:

Carnegie Mellon University: Wean Hall



photo credit http://www.samizdata.net/blog/archiv...to_differ.html

University of Pittsburgh: Barco Law Building



Photo Credit http://www.essential-architecture.co...E/STY-M11A.htm

University of Pittsburgh: Posvar Hall



photo credit http://www.tour.pitt.edu/tour-040-photo.html

University of Pittsburgh: Hillman Library



photo credit http://www.tour.pitt.edu/tour-firstmap.html

University of Pittsburgh: David L. Lawrence Hall



Photo Credithttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FileavidLawrenceHall.jpg

Last edited by deja vu; Dec 29, 2010 at 5:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 1:34 AM
Evergrey's Avatar
Evergrey Evergrey is offline
I've got a bad reputation
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 23,311
Unfortunately, the University of Pittsburgh essentially doubled in size almost overnight after it went from private to "state-related" in 1966... which just so happened to be the beginning of the short-lived brutalist movement... ushering in a wave of cold, inhuman brutalist structures within Pitt's previously elegant campus... the whole Forbes Quadrangle is a lifeless harsh dismal zone of blank concrete
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 1:38 AM
deja vu's Avatar
deja vu deja vu is offline
truth > facts ~ F.L.W.
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 188
And who can forget the notorious Boston City Hall? The epitomy of good intentions gone wrong.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...onCityhall.jpg

Last edited by deja vu; Jan 22, 2009 at 4:47 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 3:08 AM
jetsetter's Avatar
jetsetter jetsetter is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: The Occident
Posts: 424
Just about the most depressing form of architecture ever conceived.
__________________
"If there is anything to be gained by honesty, then we shall
be honest; if we must dupe, then let us be scoundrels.”
- Frederick the Great
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 3:46 AM
Jibba's Avatar
Jibba Jibba is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,041
Not sure if this qualifies as a legitimate example of the style, but I have always liked 55 West Wacker here in Chicago:


Mark 2400-flickr


Mark 2400-flickr


24gotham-flickr

Some of my own photos:



Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 4:17 AM
Ch.G, Ch.G's Avatar
Ch.G, Ch.G Ch.G, Ch.G is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,598
^ 55 W Wacker would be so much nicer with transparent glazing.

It seems like most forms of progressive architecture undergo a period of popular contempt and derision that gradually gives way to enjoyment, even adoration. Sometimes it's a matter of familiarity, but more often I think it's a new context created by newer styles. I think anti-Brutalist sentiment, of which there is no shortage even among enthusiasts of Modernism, is a perfect example. In fifty years, when new technologies become more widely adopted and give birth to forms we have only previewed or yet unseen, popular opinion will swing towards Brutalism.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 5:06 AM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is offline
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 29,927
I'm never exactly sure how to differentiate Brutalism from simple Modernism, most of the time, but I think the Michigan Capitol Complex in Lansing is an example of Brutalism:

__________________
Where the trees are the right height

Last edited by LMich; Jan 20, 2009 at 8:19 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 7:55 AM
dchan's Avatar
dchan dchan is offline
Mandate...get it on.
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Fresh Meadows, NY
Posts: 2,256
How about pretty much all of SUNY Albany?



The campus looks pretty good during the summer and sunny days. But it's unbelievably drab and depressing on a snowy or cloudy day. My brother happened to be visiting it on one of these drab days after some snowfall - the school was offering him a boatload of shit besides a full scholarship, but I knew he wasn't going there after seeing how dreary the campus looked.
__________________
I take the high road because it's the only route on my GPS nowadays. #selfsatisfied

Come and visit the Manchester Pub today!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 8:18 AM
staff's Avatar
staff staff is offline
low life in a tall place
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Melbourne.AU | Malmö.SE
Posts: 5,486
The Landstadt Building in Malmö is the kind that has its "guts on the outside"..

__________________
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 2:15 PM
Bergenser's Avatar
Bergenser Bergenser is offline
Information Age
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Bergen, Norway
Posts: 2,891
^ I like it, it's so different, It wouldn't be nice if the whole city were filled with it, but I think it fits when buildt in small numbers.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 5:32 PM
manyin manyin is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 39
Ex London Bank, Buenos Aires, Argentina, built by the architect Clorindo Testa









I like it.. I think it has beautiful details
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 5:39 PM
Jibba's Avatar
Jibba Jibba is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,041
Double.

Last edited by Jibba; Jan 21, 2009 at 4:08 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 5:49 PM
Jibba's Avatar
Jibba Jibba is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,041
^Wow, that is quite fantastic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ch.G, Ch.G View Post
^ 55 W Wacker would be so much nicer with transparent glazing.

It seems like most forms of progressive architecture undergo a period of popular contempt and derision that gradually gives way to enjoyment, even adoration. Sometimes it's a matter of familiarity, but more often I think it's a new context created by newer styles. I think anti-Brutalist sentiment, of which there is no shortage even among enthusiasts of Modernism, is a perfect example. In fifty years, when new technologies become more widely adopted and give birth to forms we have only previewed or yet unseen, popular opinion will swing towards Brutalism.
I agree about 55WW in some respects. Part of what appeals to me about Brutalist-style structures is the apparent (often actual) structural exaggeration--they're just so heavy-duty looking and expressive. If you contrast this aspect with more transparent glass that allows for a glimpse into the "fragile" (by comparison with the structure, anyway) human occupancy within, the results can be really amazing. 55WW, as a result of its opaque glazing, is still in-your-face but with no depth--kind of a conflicting mix.

I also agree that Brutalism will improve with age, and mostly for the reasons you stated.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 5:54 PM
flar's Avatar
flar flar is online now
..........
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 10,420
McMaster Health Sciences Centre, Hamilton, Ontario.




from http://www.aia.org/nwsltr_print.cfm?...0051019_change
Quote:
The McMaster Health Sciences Centre (MHSC) in Hamilton, Ontario, designed in 1972 by Craig, Zeidler, & Strong Architects, commemorates an important moment in hospital design. To keep a step ahead of the rapid changes taking place in medicine, Zeidler created an infinitely flexible space, deliberately designed never to be finished. This utopian vision, a concept of ever-changing architectural form, is demonstrated clearly in MHSC’s design, function, and image as a prototype of the “plug-in machine” modern hospital. While critics rejected the high-tech mechanical image of the hospital, others understood Zeidler’s intentions and appreciated his achievement. Even today, 30 years after the building was completed, its presence is powerful...MHSC, which was designed never to be finished, did not change in accordance with the original vision. The building did not follow its intended master plan, the expansion possibilities were not fulfilled, and the interior redevelopment was limited in scope. In this way, the vision that had intended to create an infinitely flexible and dynamic structure resulted in a static monument. Still, the importance of this project cannot be underestimated. MHSC is now an icon in the history of the modern high-tech hospital. Its bold design, which continues to raise many tough questions, denies any compromise in the expression of its utopian concept. It has stimulated the transition toward the postmodern hospital.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 6:08 PM
photoLith's Avatar
photoLith photoLith is offline
Ex Houstonian
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Millvale, Pittsburgh
Posts: 7,827
I dont think there are any examples of it where I live and im glad for that.
__________________
Visit my Western Pennsylvania History Page...

https://www.facebook.com/westernpahistory
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 6:31 PM
muppet's Avatar
muppet muppet is offline
if I sang out of tune
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: London
Posts: 3,916
London Ugly, ...worst to best

Guy's Hospital, tallest hospital in the world



Trellick Tower, so ugly it's become an icon, and a listed building for Notting Hill's yuppies:







Luxury brutalism, million dollar apartments at the Barbican Centre (also listed)









Brutalist rowhomes, Rowley Way








Last edited by muppet; Jan 20, 2009 at 6:50 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 6:48 PM
bryson662001's Avatar
bryson662001 bryson662001 is offline
BeenThere,DoneThat
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: A swanky suburb in my fancy pants
Posts: 2,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ch.G, Ch.G View Post
^ 55 W Wacker would be so much nicer with transparent glazing.

It seems like most forms of progressive architecture undergo a period of popular contempt and derision that gradually gives way to enjoyment, even adoration. Sometimes it's a matter of familiarity, but more often I think it's a new context created by newer styles. I think anti-Brutalist sentiment, of which there is no shortage even among enthusiasts of Modernism, is a perfect example. In fifty years, when new technologies become more widely adopted and give birth to forms we have only previewed or yet unseen, popular opinion will swing towards Brutalism.
You are so right. When I was young in the '60's and '70's Victorian and other late 19th and early 20th century styles were what everyone spit on. Young people today can't get enough of it. The question with Brutalisim is will it survive long enough to come back into fashion? Everywhere you look people are trying to "remodel" it or otherwise stamp it out.
__________________
Forget it Jake ................it's Market East
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 7:16 PM
deja vu's Avatar
deja vu deja vu is offline
truth > facts ~ F.L.W.
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 188
Ex London Bank, Buenos Aires, Argentina has amazing detail and I can't even grasp the shear scale of the Barbican Centre. It's also interesting to note how the McMaster Health Sciences Centre merges two strikingly different materials, glass and concrete.

Last edited by deja vu; Dec 29, 2010 at 5:35 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2009, 7:47 PM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
vertical
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: unconventionally bicoastal
Posts: 10,357
Habitat 67, Montreal - Moshe Safdie

__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2009, 12:46 AM
Johnland Johnland is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 638
Amazing thread. I didn't realize London has so many Brutalistic buildings.

Seeing Forbes Quadrangle reminded me of its sheer enormity. I think I read once that its the largest educational use building based on square footage.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:47 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.