HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum.

Since 1999, SkyscraperPage.com's forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web.  The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics.  SkyscraperPage.com also features unique skyscraper diagrams, a database of construction activity, and publishes popular skyscraper posters.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Transportation

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted May 31, 2013, 7:44 PM
Boquillas's Avatar
Boquillas Boquillas is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: 80221
Posts: 1,304
Evacuated Tube Transport

Sucked along at 4000 mph in a magnet-assisted vacuum tube. This kind of thing has probably been posted here before. The more I think about it, the more this might actually make some sense. Despite the enormous expense of the initial infrastructure--and I can see there being other issues--the overall operating cost/energy use would be lower than air travel. The people below obviously believe it is a panacea and will solve the world's transportation problems while saving incredible amounts of money. I think that's a little out there, but I think the overall idea has some merit.

I am pretty skeptical about their claims regarding the power needed to generate a vacuum to pull heavy capsules thousands of miles, and also interested in how they plan to keep the cabins full of fresh air in a vacuum tube.

I also think they need a rail or guide to keep those tubes in the concept videos from spinning...
http://www.et3.com/

Video Link

Video Link


Thoughts?
__________________
"Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work." -Chuck Close

Flickr Blog Site
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted May 31, 2013, 8:01 PM
McBane McBane is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,159
This country's current rail network utilizes 19th century technologies and is vastly surpassed by China, Japan, Europe, and pretty much every other industrialized country. Our freeways are congested, our bridges are crumbling, and our airports are outdated and inefficient. And on top of it all, our current political environment is against any sort of public spending. What makes anyone think that the US can support and build out this type of infrastructure? I see this mode of transport becoming a reality in China, Japan, Europe, etc. but not the US.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2013, 1:04 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,898
well you cant push to build anything if you dont have an idea about what to build first.

this reminds me of a modern version of the nyc beach pneumatic subway, which worked just fine in 1860s, limited as it was. so it not only has some merit on its own, it actually has a real precedent.

certainly something like this is worth further study at the very least.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2013, 6:20 PM
electricron's Avatar
electricron electricron is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Granbury, Texas
Posts: 2,224
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
this reminds me of a modern version of the nyc beach pneumatic subway, which worked just fine in 1860s, limited as it was. so it not only has some merit on its own, it actually has a real precedent.

certainly something like this is worth further study at the very least.
There's a valid reason why it failed earlier too. Can't we learn from past mistakes?
Zipping around earth at those speeds (4,000 mph) means passengers will experience huge g loads just accelerating and decelerating - imagine the g loads they will experience taking a few curves at top speed. There's a valid reason why jet fighter pilots wear g suits, even then they're limited to less than 10 g's for a few seconds at a time and they are in great physical shape. I can only imagine a humpty dumpty effect if passengers in as poor a shape as I am riding around in these 4,000 mph vehicles making a quick stop.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2013, 9:01 PM
llamaorama's Avatar
llamaorama llamaorama is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2,312
Quote:
I see this mode of transport becoming a reality in China, Japan, Europe, etc. but not the US.
Nah.

I don't see it happening anywhere in the near future. Not until we have robot excavators to build the massive infrastructure it would need.

Look at maglev. China built the line to the airport in Shanghai then decided against future expansion. Japan is taking forever to build a single line. Europe spent decades of time and money developing it from the original Birmingham Airport and Berlin people movers to the transrapid test track, and guess what, all three are gone now...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2013, 5:46 AM
canucklehead2 canucklehead2 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: YEG
Posts: 5,658
A great idea, which is why it will probably not be built! There is way more immediate money found in oil & gas and weapons production, than a transportation project that would actually be green and global in scale...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2013, 4:55 PM
jaxg8r1 jaxg8r1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 1,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by electricron View Post
There's a valid reason why it failed earlier too. Can't we learn from past mistakes?
Zipping around earth at those speeds (4,000 mph) means passengers will experience huge g loads just accelerating and decelerating - imagine the g loads they will experience taking a few curves at top speed. There's a valid reason why jet fighter pilots wear g suits, even then they're limited to less than 10 g's for a few seconds at a time and they are in great physical shape. I can only imagine a humpty dumpty effect if passengers in as poor a shape as I am riding around in these 4,000 mph vehicles making a quick stop.
Not sure of the validity, but if you watch the video it states that this method only pulls 1g.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2013, 5:36 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 33,075
It's better to fly high at those speeds far higher than the sonic boom issue and the routes would be more flexible of course.
__________________
Facebook
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2013, 9:43 PM
zilfondel zilfondel is offline
Submarine de Nucléar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 3,961
Going to nitpick here:

the video shows a slideshow/montage consisting of images of congested freeways. There is no way that a 4,000 mph tube transport is ever going to compete with transpo that has a trip length of <100 miles. Heck, 90% of freeway trips are under 50!

The only competition it would have is with the Concorde, and look what happened to THAT.

Infrastructure cost for superconducting maglev + evacuated tube transport would make the California HSR look cheap by comparison. It would have to tunnel through EVERYTHING, as it wouldn't be able to follow terrain at all - grades changes and tolerances in construction would have to be infinitesimally small.

Would be cool, but I don't see how hopping on a train in NYC and riding it through the midwest, up through northern Canada, through Alaska, Siberia, China, India, the Middle East, Europe, and finally London would EVER be faster than simply flying a regular airliner from NYC > London.

The environmental costs would also be... gigantic.

============

edit:

Maybe they could use the technology to incrementally upgrade certain long-distance HSR routes. Simply eliminating aerodynamic drag in tunnels (Chuo Shinkansen, looking at you) could vastly increase energy efficiency.

Still, would necessitate airtight cabins and compressed/liquid air supply systems.
__________________
Portland Bike Bridge traffic:

2009 - 15,749 | 2010 - 17,576 | 2011 - 18,257 | 2012 - 18,794
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2013, 1:39 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by electricron View Post
There's a valid reason why it failed earlier too. Can't we learn from past mistakes?
no there isnt. the only reason the beach 'failed' was political. boss tweed.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2013, 4:40 PM
Beta_Magellan's Avatar
Beta_Magellan Beta_Magellan is offline
Technocrat in Your Tank!
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 655
Searches thread for any mention of turn radius, sees none

Quote:
Originally Posted by llamaorama View Post
Nah.

Look at maglev. China built the line to the airport in Shanghai then decided against future expansion. Japan is taking forever to build a single line
Alon Levy’s pointed out that various Amtrak plans for the NEC have been Chuo Shinkansen-expensive. I’d honestly like to see someone do a serious, professional, non-gadgetbahnisch take on maglev in the NEC.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Jun 23, 2013, 5:04 PM
Roadcruiser1's Avatar
Roadcruiser1 Roadcruiser1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: New York City
Posts: 2,040
This proposal is nothing new. It dates back to almost 2 centuries. Here is a video from 2003 for a proposal for a Transatlantic Tunnel from Extreme Engineering a Discovery Channel show.

Video Link
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2013, 4:44 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 33,075
Elon Musk's Dream Is Coming True: Vacuum Tube Company Is Building A 3-Mile 'Hyperloop' Transport System (TSLA)

Read More: http://www.sfgate.com/technology/bus...be-4662391.php

Quote:
.....

Utilizing vacuum-sealed tubes, six-person capsules could be propelled up to speeds of 4,000 miles per hour. All while only feeling the G-forces similar to a car ride. Colorado-based company, ET3, is planning to build and test its own version of such a hyperloop system, Yahoo reports.

- Coining the term "Evacuated Tube Transport," ET3 will build a three-mile-long version to test by the end of 2013. With prototypes already constructed, ET3's pioneering foray into hyperloop transportation could quickly move the new travel system from science fiction dream into a feasible reality.

.....



__________________
Facebook
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Transportation
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 1:36 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.