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  #32601  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 5:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wig-Wag View Post
Hey CBD, my apologies. Don't know how that happened. I sure wish the site had a provision for deleting duplicate posts.

Cheers,
Jack
How to delete a double post.

Jack: The way you delete any post is to click on your duplicate post, then click EDIT and remove all of the data and upload new data such as a new photo. Its very easy...


Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Dec 18, 2015 at 6:14 PM.
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  #32602  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 6:52 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Garish and Noirish?




Undated (1930-31), DTLA Majestic Theater, May Co.
USCDigital




"So, This is London" on Majestic marquee, original release date: 1930.






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  #32603  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 7:06 PM
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Special thanks to all contributors!




1955 - Christmas on the Miracle Mile, in front of the Prudential Bldg.
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Undated, Prudential and XMAS decorations on the Mile
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E.Clem.Wilson '55
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  #32604  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 7:07 PM
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Be Safe out there!




Christmas Eve 1954. Eastbound Hollywood Freeway near Alvarado
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Bus Only
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Glimpse of Northern side of Freeway. "The cut"
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  #32605  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 7:11 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
Marilyn nee Norma Jeane was involved in production of radio controlled aircraft similar to the type that landed at the Shrine Auditorium.http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/04/up...gram.html?_r=0

http://www.uasvision.com/wp-content/...roe-_drone.jpg




UnkSource
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  #32606  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 8:05 PM
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Thanks for your excellent on follow-up on Charles Ray, e_r. A then-and-now of his house was posted by GW in post #17142.


---------------


This is the Miller Vandegrift Building, as photographed by Julius Shulman in 1949. With the help of the City Directories, I found it was at 8255 Beverly Boulevard. It's "Job 506: Miller Vandegrift Building (Los Angeles, Calif.),1949".



Here's a closer view of the entrance on the left.



I like this sweeping staircase with the plants underneath.



When I first saw the top picture, I didn't realize that the windows were set at an angle to the sidewalk.



The photoset also includes shots of a balcony and pool, which I assume were at the rear of the building. I've omitted a few because of similarity.





All from Getty Research Institute

This is 8255 Beverly Boulevard today. The property websites still give a build date of 1949, so maybe the original building is under there somewhere. The views at Historic Aerials aren't clear enough to make out the pool, but the rear of the building seems to have taken on its current configuration between 1964 and 1972. Nowadays, there appears to be a small open area with three parasols.


GSV

The entrance no longer has sloping sides, but at least they've preserved the sixteen square windows. It's a shame we can't see more of the staircase from the Googlemobile.


GSV
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  #32607  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 8:57 PM
JeffDiego JeffDiego is offline
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KCET Photos

RE: The KCET photos; I visited the KCET studio in the early or mid 70's and clearly remember a connected row of several (maybe 6) identical, tiny, mustard-colored Craftsman bungalows on the lot. Maybe they were once used as dressing rooms, or whatever? They looked incongruous amidst the Spanish Revival bldgs. Wish there was a photo.
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  #32608  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 9:37 PM
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Here are the KCET studios in 1972 and 1980. Were the bungalows on the north of the lot along Sunset Drive, JeffDiego? It looks like some small buildings there disappear during the '70s.


Historic Aerials
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  #32609  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 9:45 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Marilyn Monroe Entertains the Troops

Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
That was for her visit to Korea:


youtube
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  #32610  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2015, 11:39 PM
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I happened across this photograph in an old file of mine. I found it on eBay quite some time ago.



Does anyone know where this was located?


The reverse reads: "Kinner Airplane Factory, Los Angeles" -with a received stamped dated Jul 18, 1929.

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  #32611  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 12:40 AM
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Is this a snapshot of Charles Ray's elusive "Mayflower?"



The blogger writes:
"A few years ago, family members found this photograph among Grandma's belonging.
As a young man, her husband had visited Southern California, and had his picture taken, standing on the back of what appears to be a large wooden sailing ship.
Milt autographed the photograph to his "five-foot-two", the young lady that would become his wife. Could this be the Mayflower from "The Courtship of Miles Standish?"

from http://estatesalechronicles.blogspot...hollywood.html
________________________

With a glimpse of the surrounding area, it does look like a ship that's parked miles from the nearest port.

Do you think the roof-top sign could be the Vista Theater? (there's a gabled house visible as well)

I thought if one of us solved the snapshot mystery, I'd email the blogger and let him know our findings.


_
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  #32612  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 1:06 AM
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Last edited by Tourmaline; Dec 19, 2015 at 3:08 PM.
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  #32613  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 3:41 AM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Is this a snapshot of Charles Ray's elusive "Mayflower?"


_
I'd say off-hand that this a magnificent photo of the ersatz movie ''Mayflower"....quite an amazing relic. Sad that its no long with us.
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  #32614  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 7:02 AM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
A rare glimpse inside the Melody Lane located in the Laemmle Building at Hollywood & Vine St.
This interior is oddly reminiscent of a cocktail bar you'd find aboard a ship.
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The new Wandering In L.A. post is published!

A Couple Of Before-And-Afters That Won't Make You Sad
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  #32615  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 6:27 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Is this a snapshot of Charles Ray's elusive "Mayflower?"



The blogger writes:
"A few years ago, family members found this photograph among Grandma's belonging.
As a young man, her husband had visited Southern California, and had his picture taken, standing on the back of what appears to be a large wooden sailing ship.
Milt autographed the photograph to his "five-foot-two", the young lady that would become his wife. Could this be the Mayflower from "The Courtship of Miles Standish?"

from http://estatesalechronicles.blogspot...hollywood.html
________________________

With a glimpse of the surrounding area, it does look like a ship that's parked miles from the nearest port.

Do you think the roof-top sign could be the Vista Theater? (there's a gabled house visible as well)

I thought if one of us solved the snapshot mystery, I'd email the blogger and let him know our findings.


_

Does the area behind little Milt closely resemble a part of your profile of the ship? Hard (for me) to determine that the curved location is a match.



The hardware seems consistent with an English merchant ship of the period, and there are other equally compelling reasons to conclude the Milt-in-knickers image also includes the 1923-Standish Mayflower. However, it must be remembered that there were other silent era outdoor sets that included mocked sailing ships, or at least parts of them. Doug Fairbanks' 1926-Black Pirate comes to mind. We are informed that much of the filming took place on or near Catalina Island. But it seems likely that some of the special effects were accomplished on the UA lot. Not having researched the subject, I can imagine other silent productions with a need for historical sailing ship backdrops, e.g., Columbus, the Spanish Armada, Pirates take Wilshire and Here come the conquistadors.





1914 set at NY Hippodrome Gilbert and Sullivan's H.M.S. Pinafore
https://footlightnotes.files.wordpre..._500.jpg?w=450
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  #32616  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 6:38 PM
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A few things seen in this video are still with us: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5FZi734A2Y





Another great video I don't know if we've seen: https://www.facebook.com/philip.mers...6522015096852/
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  #32617  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 6:46 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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I wanted to note that there is a whole village of pretty buildings extending south from the Hayward-Thomas Building and Carondelet House, along Coronado and Carondelet and on W 7th Street. It doesn't look much from the air, but the streetscape is excellent.


google maps

As the 1910 Baist map (below) shows, apartments and commercial buildings had yet to make much of a dent in this single-family-homes neighborhood (just one of the original frame homes survives in the immediate area. It's at 742 S Coronado, built 1901. There's also a 1902 cottage at 747 S Carondelet, but it's unrecognizable these days).

Note that as one crosses from the Wilshire Tract (north of W 7th) to the West End Terrace Tract (south of W 7th), the streets are off-set by half a block to the east:

historicmapworks

2015:

googlemaps

A grand apartment building, "The Georgelle", at 667 S Carondelet, went in in 1917. It was built by George L Lovejoy, acting as his own architect, not far south of the intersection of S Carondelet and Wilshire, site of the Hayward-Thomas Building and Park-Wilshire Hotel:

gsv(a note on later name changes for this building is here)


building and engineering news/16 may 1917

Along S Coronado, again looking south, beyond the former site of the 1907 Hershey Arms (John C Austin/Frederick G. Brown) on Wilshire at S Coronado, is Peoples & Cheney's 1917 "The Wilshire" at No. 671. Across the street are the lovely 1922 apartments at No. 676 and the 90-room Coronado Inn (once the Hotel Parkway) at No. 682, also 1922, both by architect L.A. Smith (the Coronado Inn could obviously use some help):

gsv

The real cache of gems is on W 7th St between S Coronado and S Carondelet. There's a whole intact block here. Of the six buildings, three are by Morgan, Walls and Morgan and Morgan, Walls and Clements.


First is the Goodwin Building, on the NW corner of Carondelet and W 7th. I'd been looking for historic images of Carondelet House (it suffered a "parapet correction" in 1959 and I've been wondering how it looked as built). California State Library did have six images of the Goodwin (a block and a bit south of Carondelet House), taken by the Mott Studio in ca 1925. The Goodwin was built as stores and lofts in 1924 by Morgan, Walls and Clements. (note the Hotel Parkway roof sign behind the Goodwin). The Goodwin is an obvious forerunner to the 1926 Hayward-Thomas Building on the NW corner of S Carondelet and Wilshire:


csl


gsv

The Goodwin lost much ornament on the ground floor, but one of the beautiful wrought-iron window grills survives, so it could be somewhat restored if anyone cared to also restore the transparency of the ground floor. The exterior of the second floor, apart from the south-facing balcony, looks original:


csl


gsv

A detail of the east facade:

gsv


csl

Next door to the west is 2515-2525 W 7th built as retail shops in 1923. Morgan, Walls and Morgan get the credit here, but I think Stiles O. Clements, not yet a partner, might have been supervising architect because he signed the permit. I suspect that the building owes something to Irving Gill. It's been architects' offices of late. Two of the original columns survive, so it could also be restored to something like its original appearance. It got a handsome paint job last year.

1925:

detail from csl image above

2015:

gsv

1925. This detail shows that 2515-2525 transitions to two stories at its western end. Note the 1922 building on the NW corner of S Coronado and W 7th (on the left). It's by Thomas Franklin Powers and is still there, but grievously altered:

detail of the csl image above

2015, with Bullocks Wilshire/Southwest School of Law (1929) in the distance (note the Coronado Inn/Hotel Parkway peeking over the rooftop at center. It is much larger than its facade would lead one to believe):

gsv

Looking east, towards DTLA:

gsv

It's hard to get a unobstructed view of the transition between the one-story and two-story parts of this building
(I probably need to have a word with that "Trees-in-the-Streets" program guy):

gsv

Architect Ragnar C Qvale, Qvale Associates, owned the building from the 50s into the 80s.
He's the one who ordered a "parapet correction" for the building in 1958, stripping away the clay roof tiles:

gsv

See e_r's post for more on Ragnar Qvale.


gsv

The 1923 permit:



ladbs

Across the street, starting at the SW corner of S Carondelet and W 7th is No. 2500, designed in 1924 by E. H. Merrell. This is the building I know best of this group because it contains one of my favorite shops, McManus & Morgan, purveyors of fine papers, founded in 1923 by two UCLA students, now about 70 years at this address (the owner, whose parents owned the business before him, tells me that the shop was formerly at Heliotrope and Melrose, south of the then-campus). Also at No. 2500 is Aardvark Letterpress, vintage printers, which utilizes some techniques over 600 years old. A lovely video on the two businesses is here. Well worth watching.


google maps photos

McManus and Morgan's shop front:

blogspot

Aardvark Letterpress' corner space:

yelp

Next door to the west is No. 2510, also by Morgan, Walls and Morgan, 1923. The facade looks to be almost in original condition. There was once a barn on the rear of this lot. In 1908 it was rehabbed into a residence, or, as the permit put it "to raise a barn two feet and plaster and turn into a house".

The residential barn remained in place even as the larger building, at the front of the lot, went in, but was then demolished in 1934. Too bad, I would have liked to have seen that. I like barns. I like house barns even better.


gsv


gsv

An imposing, intact, three-story, 1909 apartment house, "The Trebon", of brick and stone, is at 2520 , across the alley. It was built by Cross & Keel for Robert Fowler. It's got massive windows, and not just on the front:


gsv

Rounding out the south side of the block on W 7th between S Carondelet and S Coronado is a wonderful group of 1924 attached cottages by Armand Monaco and Wm Bordeaux at 2524 W 7th. Monaco & Bordeaux are known for their sumptuous villas, so these cottages are a real treat (I expect there's some losses re details and finishes, but the volumes remain first-rate):


google maps


google maps

There are many more delightful buildings on the surrounding blocks, too many to catalog here.

A recap, looking east. (Unfortunately, ATM, the width of the street, the lack of parking and the scale of the streetlamps are for the convenience of through traffic. There's no opportunity or invitation to linger:

gsv

Last edited by tovangar2; Dec 14, 2016 at 6:07 AM. Reason: Correction & thx Hoss :-) for the info
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  #32618  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 7:00 PM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

I happened across this photograph in an old file of mine. I found it on eBay quite some time ago.



The reverse reads: "Kinner Airplane Factory, Los Angeles".
There are plenty of newspaper articles which mention Bert Kinner, his aircraft and their motors. Here are just a couple. The first is from the November 11, 1927 edition of the Santa Ana Register. It tells of a possible move of the company to Fullerton.


www.newspapers.com

This article is primarily about the America Aircraft Company moving to a temporary location in Huntington Beach, but it also gives some interesting background about Kinner's contributions to early aviation. It's from the October 3, 1940 edition of the Santa Ana Register.
NB. I've rearranged the layout to better fit the screen.


www.newspapers.com
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  #32619  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 7:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post

A grand apartment building at 667 S Carondelet went in in 1917 (the name is on the Baist map, but I can't read it). It was built by Geo. Lovejoy, acting as his own architect, not far south of the intersection of Carondelet and Wilshire site of the Hayward-Thomas Building and Park-Wilshire Hotel:

gsv


building and engineering news/16 may 1917
667 S Carondelet seems to be named the Georgella Apts on the Baist map (no doubt after George Lovejoy). In the City Directories, however, it's spelled Georgelle. The inset below is from the 1918 CD.


www.historicmapworks.com/LAPL
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  #32620  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2015, 7:50 PM
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Following on from tovangar2's earlier post about the area around S Coronado and S Carondelet, here's another Stiles Oliver Clements designed building. Looking carefully at the original image, I managed to read the text on the window which identifies this as the Pico & Overland branch of Security-First National Bank. It's Julius Shulman's "Job 248: Stiles Oliver Clements, Security-First National Bank of Los Angeles (Los Angeles, Calif.),1948".



And here's an interior view.



All from Getty Research Institute

When I parked the Googlemobile at Pico and Overland, I spotted a Chase Bank on one corner and a Citibank on another. I initially assumed that one of these had replaced the building above, but then I moved a couple of hundred yards west and found it on the corner of Selby Avenue. Now a Bank of America, the building has acquired an extension at the left over the years.


GSV
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