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  #34301  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2016, 5:29 PM
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JMR thanks so much, i try to keep up with you guys but its hard, so that means a great deal to me.

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Originally Posted by John Maddox Roberts View Post
Unihikid, your posts and family photos are a great resource and insight. As I've posted before, what I come here for is not just the architecture (which is wonderful) but for a window in how life was lived in L.A. in the old days. You show us a part of L.A. that most of us never saw. Keep it coming!
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  #34302  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2016, 8:16 PM
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Pangborn-Fairbanks-Crawford

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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
originally posted by HossC



Cradle Snatchers 1927, seven reels 6,281 feet. (missing reel 4, and part of 3)
Directed by Howard Hawks.

In this instance, I believe the stage players are a bit more interesting than the players in the film (except maybe Franklin Pangborn)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cradle_Snatchers

everyone's favorite 'fancy pants' Franklin Pangborn

icollector.com
Was actor Franklin Pangborn also some kind of theatrical impresario?


Los Angeles Times,
August 30, 1929:

LAPL

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Joan Crawford (I think at Santa Monica Beach), 1929. They were married on
June 23 of that year; he was 19 and she was apparently 25:

Photo by Clarence Sinclair Bull/John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images @ Vanity Fair -- http://media.vanityfair.com/photos/5...irbanks-jr.jpg

In 1929 Franklin Pangborn lived at 316 N. Sycamore in this 1927-built four-plex:

Feb 2015 GSV
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  #34303  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2016, 8:29 PM
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This Julius Shulman subject certainly isn't new to NLA - it's the Prudential Building on Wilshire Boulevard's Miracle Mile. This is "Job 699: Wurdeman & Becket, Prudential Building (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1950". Several of the pictures also show Ohrbach's.







Some of the other tenants include Security First National Bank, Kaufman Furs, New York Hat Stores and Innes Shoes.









All from Getty Research Institute

Last edited by HossC; Jun 23, 2016 at 9:03 PM. Reason: Fix link/spelling.
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  #34304  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2016, 9:33 PM
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I may not be quick, but at least I can say I don't act rashly.

My blog post concerning this area has finally been published, or at least the first part of it which only covers the 19th century.

Block 50, Part I

Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm View Post
(ETA: Added a couple of notations on the included pictures, a new "Now" version of the "Italian Stores" shot, and in the North Spring photo, an inset showing camera position and FOV.)

TL;DR version: I found a photo of the small block bounded by North Spring, New High, and Sunset Boulevard, now a forgotten piece of L.A. history long since obliterated by the giant El Pueblo parking lot at 601 N. Main. Picture is also displayed in an image tag below. You can read my comments on the Flickr page; for full picture credits and a more detailed discussion, read on.




I don't know if this has been answered yet, but a couple of days ago, just by luck, I happened on the answer, plus a view I don't think we've seen here before.

On another message board community, a poster pointed out that the plat maps created and used by assessors often reveal old street alignments, and went so far as to compare it to an X-ray.

He wasn't far wrong, as I found out when I went to the County Assessor's website's property database, and noticed that three oddly shaped parcels still mapped, right in the middle of that giant parking lot. Here, we see only the largest and westernmost of the three highlighted:


(From the L.A. County Assessor's website)


No address, and no build dates, of course, but that's to be expected since there are no structures. But there used to be some buildings there, as we'll see.

But wait, there's more.

Switching from the satellite to roadmap view, we begin to understand what happened with Spring, Main, and New High streets. It's mildly astonishing that the database still records the old street alignments that vanished more than half a century ago. Although this appears to be based on Google Maps, Google itself doesn't provide this interest bit of knowledge.

We now see that North Spring used to run east of New High, which it still does, but the modern alignment throws us off because today the nearly obliterated stub end of New High starts below the modern Spring Street alignment. South of Sunset/Chavez, Spring was rerouted about a block west. The original alignment resumes north of there, so that through New Chinatown both New High and Spring resume their old routes. This should surprise nobody, since that neighborhood still boasts a few buildings from the late 19th to early 20th centuries which are still clearly sited on their original streets.


(From the L.A. County Assessor's website)

Curiously, the plat map, shown in the next picture shows both the new and old alignments of Sunset Boulevard, now duly relabeled in honor of Cesar Chavez.


(From the L.A. County Assessor's website -- better resolved image available here.)

and again we see that weird triangular area comprising three parcels.

As to the street address of the Sentous Block, the North Spring address is correct, as shown on the Baist map. The confusion with North Main comes from the fact that North Spring, like so many other streets, underwent not only realignment, as noted above, but also a flurry of name changes. In the 19th Century it was Upper Main, and was distinct from North Main, which was where it remains today. IIRC in those days there was a rise in elevation, hence the very confusing name for what we would now call North Spring, if only this block of it still existed.


(Sanborn Map, access provided by the San Diego PL.)

For a few years early in the last century, it was San Fernando Road, but by the time of the 1921 Baist survey, it had become North Spring. From that map, it does appear that all of these parcels fronted both North Spring and North Main. Did the Sins book give an even numbered address for the Bamba? It's not difficult to imagine that they could have managed valet parking and taxis on the Main side. The situation with the Sentous is similar, though given its build date, it could have been listed, at various times, on "real" Main Street, or Upper Main, or North Spring.

And now let's go back to those parcels in the middle of the parking lot. I found a photo in the LAPL collection taken from the west, dated April 9, 1940 according to the catalog entry.


(LAPL photo collection, order number 00104245, q.v. if you don't see the photo immediately above.)

The Italian Stores Company was a small chain of grocery stores that had several locations in the DTLA area. This one appears in the 1934 City Directory, listed at 229 W Sunset, corroborating well with the Baist survey map image in Beaudry's post.

(Los Angeles City Directory for 1934, classified section, p2534. LAPL Visual Collection)

Later, the grocery store moved out and a restaurant called O Sole Mio moved in. Identifying the type of restaurant is left as an exercise for the reader.

Obviously, this address was on the original alignment, where we see Sunset veering off to the right. The Baist map lists a couple of hotels in this block, but I was unable to find any of those listed in any of the directories. Possibly they were boarding houses run by landladies who only took in boarders with references, and preferred not to announce their presence to all and sundry.

To the left of the Italian market, we look down Bellevue Avenue, somewhat close to the present-day alignment of Sunset/Chavez. The Bamba Club, one door north of the Sentous Block, is partially visible in the distance. ETA: In the far distance, at the very right margin, we can see the Fook Wo Lung building standing on the southeast corner of Los Angeles and Sunset/Marchessault, and dwarfed by the gasometer behind it. This building was home to the Dragon's Den Restaurant.

As we let our gaze continue along Sunset, we see the south end of that narrow block between North Main and North Spring; the building there is the Pacific Hotel at 608 1/2 North Spring. Just north of there was the Hotel Atlantic, with the Sentous building just beyond that. If we could wander on down Sunset and turn left at North Spring, then wander up to the other end of the block, this is what we'd see if we turned around:



(LAPL Photo Collection, order number 00014327, q.v. if image doesn't appear here. Inset from the 1921 Baist map, showing approximate position and FOV of camera, added by me.)

At once we're struck by the abundance of hotels; nearly every other building seems to house one. The demand for cheap lodgings, given the neighborhood population of the era which skewed heavily transit dependent and working class, was vast and deep. The decade following these images brought about a major change, as a result of which the neighborhood now skewed heavily towards -- nothing. NYC has Tribeca; San Francisco has...well, San Francisco; and Chicago has the Near North Side. Even San Diego has the Gaslamp. But in L.A. we've got a half-dozen parking lots and a few architectural remnants--and, of course, relentlessly regularized boulevards.

If we could keep going down Sunset, we'd cross Main and then the north end of the Plaza, immediately south of the Simpson Building, Olvera Street, and the Methodist Church. There was a time when the Plaza Church, now addressed on the west side of Main, and the Plaza Methodist Church both had Sunset Boulevard addresses, W and E respectively. Going still further we'd pass the last remnant of Old Chinatown on our right, and then straight across Alameda into the main entrance of Union Station.

Having seen all of these images, it is impossible not to feel resentment, nay, a simmering rage, at what has been lost, and for nothing more than a parking lot. Here we see images from a time when this neighborhood possessed a certain vigor and was full of crazy-angled streets and old architecture--a sort of Southern Californian Altstadt. In hindsight, it seems that this neighborhood, in particular, became the poster child of the suburbanist urban renewal ethos of making Downtown America car-friendly and everything-else-unfriendly. Another factor, perhaps, was a priggish urge to rid the neighborhood of "unsightliness", including any evidence of nightlife like the Bamba, and for that matter the working people who lived here along with the cheap hotels and other businesses that catered to them. The neighborhood was going to be cleaned up, and if it meant total destruction, then so be it. We couldn't have busloads of school children coming down here to see Olvera Street and let them see that, could we?

ETA: An approximate "Now" version of the above picture:


(GSV Screengrab)

Nearly everything in the 1940 picture has been bulldozed, revealing at extreme right the the Plaza Substation, and at left the entire elevation of the Terminal Annex, were before only the top of the tower could be seen.
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A Couple Of Before-And-Afters That Won't Make You Sad
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  #34305  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 1:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
This Julius Shulman subject certainly isn't new to NLA - it's the Prudential Building on Wilshire Boulevard's Miracle Mile. This is "Job 699: Wurdeman & Becket, Prudential Building (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1950". Several of the pictures also show Orbach's.

Some of the other tenants include Security First National Bank, Kaufman Furs, New York Hat Stores and Innes Shoes.
Beautiful.
I was especially happy to see Innes Shoes. The Times, describing the store (designed by architect Burton A. Shutt) said it “brings the California outdoor atmosphere” indoors with full length sliding glass doors on both the Wilshire and parking lot entrances.

Innes Shoes (5771 Wilshire) opened September 8, 1949

lat

The Prudential Building itself had its grand opening November 15, 1948; a "Completion Day" ceremony was held March 8, 1950 to mark the end of all construction.

Ohrbach’s (5711 Wilshire) opened December 2, 1948

lat 12-3-48

Security First Bank (5779 Wilshire) February 3, 1949.

lat 2-2-49

Prudential Square Drug Co. (5761 Wilshire) Star studded gala opening August 25, 1949 an went through the weekend. What day is Burt Lancaster going to be there?

lat 8-25-49

Kaufman Furs (5775 Wilshire) December 1, 1949. Modern design featuring cedar paneling, a mirrored wall and "floating" display racks on almost invisible rods.


New York Hat Store (5773 Wilshire) December 8, 1949. Featuring rustic redwood and cypress trim, native shrubbery, flagstone & untramodern lighting.


lat 12-8-49

Last edited by Noircitydame; Mar 27, 2016 at 2:44 PM. Reason: add Kaufman date
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  #34306  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 2:32 AM
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Easter greetings, NLA!

postcard view, files

If it was Easter 1949: why attend the Hollywood Bowl Sunrise Service in person (think of all that traffic...) when you could watch it on television via KTLA. Don't have a set? Your local branch of Pierce Brothers has got it covered.

lat 4-16-47
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  #34307  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 3:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noircitydame View Post
Easter greetings, NLA!

postcard view, files

If it was Easter 1949: why attend the Hollywood Bowl Sunrise Service in person (think of all that traffic...) when you could watch it on television via KTLA. Don't have a set? Your local branch of Pierce Brothers has got it covered.
The Hollywood Bowl does not list a Sunrise Easter Service for 2016. I guess the event is dead.

http://www.hollywoodbowl.com/tickets/calendar/2016-03
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  #34308  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 4:04 AM
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Old Auto Club Building on North Hill St.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post



What's the lone house atop the hill at upper left?

_
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
That is, believe it or not, the old Auto Club Building which was situated on Hill Street, right where it makes the turn to run down to Sunset Boulevard north of the high school. It shows pretty clearly on the 1921 Baist, sheet 3, upper right hand corner. It also shows in this Shulman pic originally posted by HossC...(it's immediately to the left of the white apartment building at 560 N. Hill Street)

Looking south on Castelar, Julius Shulman, 1949

Beautiful Shulman image looking south on Castelar from about Bernardo Street in 1949. The houses on Fort Moore Hill are gone having been razed in '47. Although, surprisingly, the old Auto Club building and the apartment building at 560 N. Hill Street are still hugging the north slope.

via NLA HossC
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
The N. Hill Street Auto Club building was a much more modest structure albeit also camera-shy. Here's a shot of it looking up, at Fort Moore Hill, from Sunset Boulevard and N. Hill Street (north of Sunset)...

Sunset Boulevard at Hill Street, 1925

In the archive as 'Sunset Boulevard looking south at Hill Place and Fort Moore Hill.' Strictly speaking, there was no 'Hill Place' in 1925. This would pre-date Hill Street moving over and assuming the roadbed of Castelar north of Sunset and what had been Hill Street where it angled down off of Fort Moore Hill crossed Sunset and continued to a terminus at Alpine Street. This section of Hill Street ultimately became Hill Place but not before Castelar had been renamed Hill Street. Certainly not in 1925. Immediately on the right we have is the apartment building at 560 N. Hill Street backing to Sunset Boulevard. Up there on Hill Street where it makes it's turn to run parallel to Sunset, sporting the Coca Cola adverts, is the old Auto Club Building at 546 N Hill Street (and just beyond it, to the right, is the back of Mary Hollister Banning's carriage house). The Auto Club occupied this building briefly starting in about 1918-19 and moving into their big headquarters building on S Figueroa by 1923.

LAPL
MR, I think the following two photos also show that same old Auto Club building.

Looking north from near Broadway over 101 Freeway construction, May 6, 1950:

Mildred Harris photo - 00109965 @ LAPL

Looking northwest from City Hall, December 6, 1950, with the old Auto Club building on the corner of the hill;
that's North Hill Street angling toward the upper right corner:

Mildred Harris photo - 00109974 @ LAPL

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Mar 27, 2016 at 4:05 AM. Reason: better title
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  #34309  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 5:28 AM
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Hollywood Freeway, 1954.

Metro Transportation Library and Archive
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  #34310  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 7:45 AM
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CBD, the Hollywood Bowl, as I understand, never sold tickets to the Easter Sunrise Service, as it was always co-ordinated by several different churches of different denominations and was a strictly volunteer program. Donations for various churches were accepted at the event.

I attended one of them a dozen years ago and in the years afterwards it seems the event has begun to deteriorate. There were thefts of musical equipment one year. The bowl remodeled and had to cancel it one year. I believe it was held elsewhere. Recently they had some services there, but they were not traditional sunsrise services, but held at 11 a.m.

It's really distressing that such a long (it would be coming up on 100 years) tradition has somehow just dismantled with so much as a whimper.

A 2010 article, link HERE, when that year's service was cancelled states:

In a sign of the times and victim of the economy, a 90 year-old Hollywood tradition falls in the cultural forest and nobody is there to hear it hit the ground.

The Hollywood Bowl Easter Sunrise Service is, or was, a tradition that predated the Hollywood Bowl itself.

The Hollywood Bowl exists today [...], most of all, because of the many people who gathered in the Daisy Dell on an Easter Sunday morning at dawn and participated in a simple Sunrise Service that was open and non-denominational and free of charge, simply a celebration of Easter.

There are some things that are alarming about the cancellation of the 2010 Hollywood Bowl Easter Sunrise Service:

It happened without so much as a whimper. "There, but for the Grace of God, go I!" should be the warning to the people of Los Angeles County.

What next? Will Galleries close with little more than a notice to announce the passing?

Will Theaters close without so much as a Swan Song performance?

Will Museums cease to engage the public and simply serve as monuments to their benefactors? Will Libraries close and serve out their days as cultural warehouses?

Will access to our Parks and our Community Centers become a thing of the past?

How does the 90 year-old, non-denominational, open and free to the public, Hollywood Bowl Easter Sunrise Service simply fade into nothingness without an alarm from the community?

It happened because the public is getting priced out of its own property.

The Bowl belongs to the County of Los Angeles. In other words, it belongs to the people. Just like the Zoo, the Museums, the Galleries, the Parks, the Music Center, Olive Hill, the Libraries, and all of the wonderful programs and assets that we take for granted, simply because they've always been there. It's not likely to continue.

Now, more than ever, it is imperative that the people of Los Angeles look around and consider that the streets they travel on, the sidewalks they walk on, the public space they enjoy, are all in jeopardy of being restricted and that the public is in danger of engaging "the highest bidder" in a competition for the simple elements that make up a Great City.


It's a unique event that anyone can enjoy regardless of any religious affiliation and I am so glad I attended one of them before it began to unnecessarily fade away into the ether, as stated above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
Easter Sunrise Service at the Hollywood Bowl (1944)

Hollywood Photographs

Ever since I first saw this photo years ago I’ve always found it very haunting. I wondered what the sailors and others were thinking about and what they might have been through and even where they were from. The end of the war was over a year off, but at this time no one knew that. They only knew it had been going on for nearly three years at that point. An event like this Sunrise Easter Service may have been more poignant and emotional than usual. This photograph actually inspired me to attend one of these Easter Sunrise Services about a dozen years ago and it was quite memorable. It’s a tradition that’s been under siege recently because of several factors. One was extensive remodeling and the facility wasn’t available a couple times. Another was theft of properties used in the event. The more serious factors, though, are the expense to put it on (it is free) and the unfortunate dwindling of attendance. If it does not continue it’s a real shame because it’s a unique and beautiful experience, even if one is not religiously or spiritually inclined.
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  #34311  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 7:49 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Happy Easter Noirishers...

Meta_Luna/Flickr

I bet things were hoppin' here!

The photo source indicates she had a job in the 1980's where she was asked to
clear out a desk that had some photos in it, including this one which she dates
to c.1960's. Corner of Sunset and Hobart according to source page.

We can certainly see the address on the street sign: 5300 Sunset Blvd.
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  #34312  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 8:14 AM
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As I was looking at this photo, and also a Google Street View, something wasn't adding up to me.
If you type in 5300 Sunset Blvd. you get the corner of Sunset and Hobart where there is a
current business called 5300 Sunset Hair Studio.

BUT--in typing 5300 Sunset Blvd. into Google Images I came up with conflicting information.
If you travel east one block in the Google Street View there is ALSO a street sign at Sunset
and Serrano that says 5300 Sunset Blvd. (I did this three times to make sure I was being
accurate, but I'm open to someone else's opinion.)

Yelp indicates that 5300 Sunset Hair Studio has closed and LoopNet has a 2015 listing for it
as a bankruptcy sale and an address of 5300 - 5302 Sunset Blvd.

Loopnet has a photo of Bill's Liquor Market at Sunset and Serrano with an address of
5326 Sunset Blvd. But you can see the street sign on the street also says 5300 Sunset Blvd.

LoopNet

This is the building housing the Honey Bunny.

In searching for the right location I happened upon some other info about this location and a man named Earl Bruce:

Earl Bruce (sometimes you see his first name spelled Earle) was a pretty flamboyant character. Among other things, Earl was a one-time movie actor and singer under contract, race car driver, and drinking buddy of both Von Dutch and Dick Hirschberg (who also owned a bar across from L.A.'s Union Station rail terminal in the '40's.). Bruce owned a bar on Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood, called the Big Top, a kind of combination beer hall/jazz club. Von Dutch would work at his mechanic shop until around 11:00pm, then wander down to the Big Top after that to drink and play his flute.

The Big Top, which Earl owned from 1950-1964, was in the same location as the Honey Bunny, at Sunset and Serrano
.



You can see the two red painted window areas (one with a fan) in the Honey Bunny photo.

That's Earl Bruce posing with his custom car which he dubbed "The Armoured Car." Source info:

Earl Bruce bought his '40 Ford brand-new in Downtown Los Angeles, in Sept. of 1939. He walked into the Ford dealership,
looked at the car, said "I'll take it", and handed the salesman a $1,000.00 bill. The salesman was stunned, as was everyone
at the dealership who looked at the note, all having never ever seen one. But the salesman went to the finance office, got the
paperwork sorted, and returned with the title and $45.00 change, then he filled up the '40 with gas for Bruce.


It is stated that he repainted "the Armored Car in various colors dozens of times over through the years , along with about the
same number of changes in the interior/trunk upholstery, and wheel/tire combinations.
"

Here it is in the 1970's painted in "Bruce Red."



SIDEBAR:

Near Sunset and Serrano in 1931:

A 1931 view of Sunset Blvd. east of Serrano.

USC Digital Library
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  #34313  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 12:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noircitydame View Post

Beautiful.
I was especially happy to see Innes Shoes. The Times, describing the store (designed by architect Burton A. Shutt) said it “brings the California outdoor atmosphere” indoors with full length sliding glass doors on both the Wilshire and parking lot entrances.

Innes Shoes (5771 Wilshire) opened September 8, 1949

lat
Great follow-up, NCD. Julius Shulman took this photo of Innes Shoes in 1949. Sadly, there's only one image in the set. This must be the parking lot side. It's "Job 557: Burton Schutt, Innes Shoe Store (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1949".


Getty Research Institute
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  #34314  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 1:37 PM
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Jail Choir, 1952


Jail choir Easter, 8 April 1952. Mrs. Nina Snodgrass (Women's Jail Chaplain); Al Willey (Chief jailer); Eugene W. Biscailuz; Lieutenant Frances O. Blumfeld; Audrey Lehre (Deputy Sheriff) leading easter choir of jail inmates. (lotta things going on here)

USC digital archive/Los Angeles Examiner Collection, 1920-1961
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  #34315  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 1:40 PM
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Easter Sunrise Service, Hollywood Bowl, 1921


Before a bandstand was deemed necessary...


image from hollywoodbowl.com
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  #34316  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 1:53 PM
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April 25, 1943


Army chaplain Father Marius Chataignon conducts Easter Sunday Mass for troops near the front lines in Tunisia.

Los Angeles Times

FWIW, My uncle Bob (Zimmerman) was in Tunisia with the Big Red One (1st Infantry Division) in April, 1943. Several men in this image are most likely Tankers (note goggles left foreground).
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  #34317  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 4:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
MR, I think the following two photos also show that same old Auto Club building.

Looking north from near Broadway over 101 Freeway construction, May 6, 1950:

Mildred Harris photo - 00109965 @ LAPL

Looking northwest from City Hall, December 6, 1950, with the old Auto Club building on the corner of the hill;
that's North Hill Street angling toward the upper right corner:

Mildred Harris photo - 00109974 @ LAPL

Yes, good call FW, both cases. Interestingly in your first image you get a good look at the San Fernando and the Sunset Hotels at Ord and N Spring Streets (and isn't that an interesting silver van/truck parked down on the graded flats?). We've talked about them both. And in your second shot a reasonable look at the partial front of the apartment building at 560 N Hill Street. Here's that apartment building...


560 N Hill Street, Fort Moore Hill, Los Angeles, CA, 1925

This eight-story apartment building numbers up here on N Hill Street, overlooking Sunset Boulevard, with the rest of the structure reaching down the slope/cliff, Alta Vista Apartment-like, to Sunset.

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987
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  #34318  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 6:03 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
Julius Shulman's "Job 2248: Palmer and Krisel, Sunset Tower, cabanas and pool (Los Angeles, Calif.),1956".
Just something I've been wondering about for quite awhile. Why wouldn't the
Shulman photos have included addresses for the subjects? It makes for some
amusement to find some locations we aren't sure about, but I've always thought
it curious that a record of the street address wouldn't have been included.
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  #34319  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 7:12 PM
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Most of the Julius Shulman photosets only include a building name, architect and date. Just occasionally there's an address or extra piece of information (e.g. the set below says "For Living for Young Homemakers"). USC often include scans of the containing envelopes with their images, and even then, information is scarce. Admittedly, having the location would make things easier, but it would also take away some of the fun .

I'm confused by today's Julius Shulman photoset - I think it's been mislabeled. Its title is "Job 1250: Henry Hester, Gill Apartments (Los Angeles, Calif.),1952", but it includes an indentifiable exterior shot of 315 South Virgil Avenue (see post #33851) as well as several interior and exterior images which may or may not be from the same location. In the middle are these four photos of a couple in an MG visiting various drive-in businesses. Does anyone recognize this cleaning establishment?



This is Zinke's Drive-in Shoe Repair (it appears in most of the CDs as the Zinke Re-Bottoming Shoe Co Inc). See below for more details.



Receiving an order at Tiny Naylors (Sunset and La Brea).



I can't see many clues to identify this location.



All from Getty Research Institute

Zinke's had many locations, but I think the one in the picture above was at 3852 Wilshire Boulevard, nearly opposite the Wilshire Professional Building. Here's an earlier shot with the sign for the drive-in on the right.


USC Digital Library
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  #34320  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2016, 7:21 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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ICTV / Info from M-G-M Hollywood's Greatest Backlot

On the set of Easter Parade. M-G-M, 1948.
Filming "A Fella with an Umbrella" number.

MGM Lot 3 / #60: Easter Parade Street
South of Jefferson Blvd. in Culver City was MGM's huge Lot #3 where jungles, seaports,
lakes and trees, some bridges, groves, an army base, circus grounds and several western
streets were located.

At the end of the lot's Drumhead Road laid an empty paved area where, in 1948, two blocks
of the 5th Avenue outdoor set for Easter Parade were built. Unlike many constructed sets
that remained where they were built, after the scenes were in the can, this street was
completely removed and shipped to Lot #2's New York Street.

Now mostly apartment buildings stand in the echoes of this place where memories were made.
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