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  #20361  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2014, 10:39 PM
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Thanks for digging out the Brack Shops info, e_r. I saw the name in the City Directories but failed the remember that they'd come up before on NLA.


--------------


While I was looking for pictures of the Cowards Wildly Edwards & Wildey Building yesterday, I came across the one below. It's a little blurrier than the others, but does show the blade sign which started the discussion. Of course, I didn't need to look any further than NLA for a picture of the Edwards & Wildey Building - e_r posted one back in post #4851! What caught my attention with this picture was the building on the right.


USC Digital Library

After a bit of Googling I found it was the University Club of Los Angeles at 614-622 South Hope. A quick search of NLA yielded no previous mentions, so I don't think this is a repeat (I won't be surprised if someone else finds it!). According to an article on www.csulb.edu, the building had its formal opening July 6, 1922.


Ebay

I can't find too much more about the building after that, although the History of the Zamorano Club says they moved into the building in 1934 and stayed until it was razed in 1967. LAPL dates the William Reagh picture below as 1970, but they also have a different framing of exactly the same shot dated as 1965.


LAPL

The earliest picture that LAPL have is dated 1925. It shows a parking lot and another building to the right.


LAPL

By 1938, the parking lot has made way for Wilshire Boulevard.


LAPL

I also found this picture at LAPL. The caption says "The University Club was founded in this building at 913 South Broadway on March 27, 1898, in the home of Russ Avery. This corner is seen in 1892, when the first Eastern stores were founded by Adolph Sieroty, later the location of the Eastern new height-limit home." Is this the same University Club?


LAPL
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  #20362  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2014, 10:40 PM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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http://imgzoom.cdlib.org/Converter?i...0&w=1030&h=643







Borrowing from HGraham's '33 or '39 empirical observation, I am inclined to agree with the '33 crowd.

The prime indicator of date (for me) might be a contemporaneous newspaper ad, review or playbill of the "world premier." It may be far from common for a live performance to be one show only, but it has been known to happen on Broadway and plenty of High Schools, so why not Ocean Ave? For all we know, the show was preempted when the Navy unexpectedly canceled all shore leave. Come to think of it, Long Beach's world premier could have had a loose but novel plot line involving three sailors on 24 hour shore leave. With just the right musical numbers and a different Port City, it might have inspired . . . ? Well never mind.

Respecting license plate dates, I assume the conclusion is based on shape rather than issuing numbers and possibly color, since previous Long Beach imagery has included many out-of-State plates. Bus shapes are not necessarily determinative of date.

If the image is from '33, there is no obvious earthquake damage. Either it has been quickly swept up or this area escaped with easily remedied damage. It is also possible that the photo was taken pre-March 10, even though this includes a world premier banner for an event many weeks in the future.

Another observation concerning one photo's caption of the Bank being open. For those keeping score, the '33 LBQuake struck on a Friday at approximately 5:55 PM. That date was also part of a 3-day bank Holiday declared by the Gov. It has been said that the bank Holiday may have spared a few Long Beach'ers who might have been conducting banking or spending their money at other businesses - from serious injury or worse. We will never know. http://ladailymirror.com/2011/08/26/...ch-quake-1933/


If anyone's interested, "Of Mice and Men" was released in - 1939
http://www.pacificelectric.org/wp-co...ch-4-18-39.jpg



http://www.worldlicenceplates.com/jp...S_CAXX_GI2.jpg

http://www.atticpaper.com/prodimages.../greyhound.jpg

Last edited by Chuckaluck; Mar 19, 2014 at 11:04 PM.
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  #20363  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2014, 10:47 PM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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A few more fascinating Long Beach images.
Quote:
Prior to the construction of a 150-acre airport in 1923, pilots could be seen taking off and landing on the long strand of beach or on a sand and dirt field near American Avenue (now Long Beach Boulevard) and Bixby Road -- Chateau Thierry Flying Field -- which was founded by Earl Daugherty. The first transcontinental flight landed in the water off Pine Avenue Pier on December 10, 1911.

Daugherty, a WWI flight instructor and stunt pilot expanded his airfield to Long Beach Boulevard and Willow Street by the late 1920's -- where he organized Air Tournaments and Air Circuses. A young Amelia Earhart (and 75,000 others) came to the December 1920 air tournament to watch Daugherty's stunt flying. She asked for a ride in a plane and was given one a few days later by Poly High School graduate, Frank Hawks. Later, Long Beach area pilot, John Montijo, taught Earhart how to solo and to perform aerobatics -- which she did numerous times in Long Beach Air Circuses.

Realizing that Long Beach could no longer accommodate aviation on its beach nor on Daugherty's small airfield inland, the city council in November 1923 dedicated 80 acres of water department land at Cherry Avenue and Spring Street making Long Beach the first city in California to establish a municipal airport. http://gerrieschipske.blogspot.com/2...terminals.html
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_f8eLZxxJyM...0/Slide101.JPG

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_f8eLZxxJyM...0/Slide124.JPG

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_f8eLZxxJyM...0/Slide177.JPG
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  #20364  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2014, 11:22 PM
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That last photo is fascinating indeed Chuckaluck.


I came across this photograph of the 1933 earthquake earlier today.

ebay

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 19, 2014 at 11:43 PM.
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  #20365  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2014, 11:33 PM
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You may recall, we discussed Carolina Pines a week or so ago.
I had mislabeled a photograph as being on Melrose Avenue, when it was actually on La Brea & Sunset.

I just came across this matchbook with that same elusive 7315 Melrose address.

ebay
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  #20366  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2014, 11:45 PM
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...more dynamite in noirish Los Angeles.

ebay

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 20, 2014 at 12:59 AM.
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  #20367  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2014, 11:59 PM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
You may recall, we discussed Carolina Pines a week or so ago.
I had mislabeled a photograph as being on Melrose Avenue, when it was actually on La Brea & Sunset.

I just came across this matchbook with that same elusive 7315 Melrose address.

ebay

Mentioned here too. http://books.google.com/books?id=c6m...rolina&f=false
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  #20368  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post

LAPL

I also found this picture at LAPL. The caption says "The University Club was founded in this building at 913 South Broadway on March 27, 1898, in the home of Russ Avery. This corner is seen in 1892, when the first Eastern stores were founded by Adolph Sieroty, later the location of the Eastern new height-limit home." Is this the same University Club?


LAPL

From what I can tell, there were earlier attempts to form University clubs—but the organization that built the Hope Street building was indeed formed in 1898 in Mr. Avery's parlor (Avery was later a distinguished judge):


LAT May 5, 1898/Dec 31, 1922



LAT Sept 19, 1921/July 9, 1967

It sounds like the University Club remained in the building until the end. The Zamorano Club was a group interested in the history/art of printing who met in the building... an August Zamorano apparently being California's first printer.

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Mar 20, 2014 at 1:08 AM.
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  #20369  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 12:37 AM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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____________________________________________________________________





A few more glimpses of this impressive presence.


1891
http://waterandpower.org/1%20Histori...house_1891.jpg

http://imgzoom.cdlib.org/Converter?i...0&w=1200&h=768




http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/tf6f59p5ts/hi-res



In the shadow of the magnificent court building, Chinatown living space, 739-742 N. Alameda.

http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/tf7199p5kv/hi-res
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  #20370  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 1:22 AM
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USCDL

An earlier home of the University Club, 349 S. Hill. It appears to still be under construction. The USC dates this pic as 1905--the Times reported on Aug 7, 1904, that John Parkinson had designed a new building for the club.

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Dec 23, 2015 at 1:33 PM.
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  #20371  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 2:21 AM
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Excellent find GW! That photograph is fantastic.
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  #20372  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 2:33 AM
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Those are some very cool finds on the University Club on Hope Street. I can't say it's very good-looking to me but it sure was noirish.
__________________
My blog of then and now photos of LA: http://urbandiachrony.wordpress.com
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  #20373  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 4:48 AM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Here is the part of the auditorium that was saved and incorporated into the new theater. [outlined in orange] How do I know this? I used to live 5 blocks from this site and watched the entire process. I kept wondering why they did not demo the entire structure. As the months went by I could see they were using the old stage and theatrical fly structure for the new building. This saved them a lot of money. The yellow arrow shows the old fly structure as it appears today being incorporated into the new structure.

SC
SC
Good thing you were there to witness what took place. I still find it interesting there is no mention of saving what they did anywhere on the Internet. Admittedly I didn't get into doing a search of newspaper archives.

When looking at what they did it's really difficult to imagine parts of the old structure were incorporated into the new, especially since they literally enveloped the old with new and totally changed the exterior appearance of what can be seen of the old.
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  #20374  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 11:17 AM
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301 S. Olive and 137-39 S. Broadway

Earl Millar lived at 301 S. Olive and built an office block at 37/39 S. Fort Street, later 137/39 S. Broadway.

He moved into his home -- which he was to occupy for a third of a century -- at the SW corner of 3rd and Olive in November 1883:

November 7 1883 LA Times

This zoomed photo looks SW from the Nadeau Hotel, which was completed in August 1883. At the SE corner of 3rd and Olive, where in 1886 the Crocker Mansion will be built, is a small house
(to the left of the turreted barn). The Millar home may be hidden behind the two homes at the top of the hill near the center of the photo (the darker, two-story house with the porches,
and the house above and behind it):

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...d/1761/rec/196

SW corner 3rd and Olive, 1888 Sanborn:

LAPL

Once the Crocker Mansion was built, plenty of photos of the era looked up at it or down from it! But zooming in on this 1898 photo from 3rd and Spring is the best view I could get of the
Millar home, behind and to the left of the Crocker. As in the previous photo, we see the turreted barn, and to the right of the Crocker the dark, two-story patioed home -- apparently
renovated -- plus the house above it:

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15799coll65/id/3480/rec/18[/url]

In this c. 1905 zoomed view from the Court House, the Millar home is right of center -- opposite the Crocker Mansion -- and seemingly with a white pole sticking out of the middle of it (but
not really of course; it's probably one of the early light masts):

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co.../id/1227/rec/7

We've seen many photos here showing the top of Angel's Flight, but, again, not the SW corner of 3rd and Olive just across the street! The Millar home appears on the 1921 Baist map,
but zooming in on this February 20, 1963 photo suggests that the home didn't last much longer after 1921 and was replaced by a modest commercial building (we see the rear end of
a green-and-white car parked in front of it):

Huntington Digital Library -- http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...id/7647/rec/40

The Millar Block will be built just north of the NW corner of 2nd and Fort (later Broadway), perhaps starting in late 1885. Here's that intersection in the right foreground, c. 1883-84.
The church in the foreground is the First Presbyterian, completed in April 1883 on the SE corner of 2nd and Fort. Its pastor at this time was J. W. Ellis, of Ellis Vista College:

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...d/1759/rec/185

The Millar Block was completed in early 1886:

July 2 1886 LA Times


1887 LA City Directory @ Fold3.com

This photo of the two-story Millar Block shows the west/rear side (stepped wall at top with wooden porch attached) and north side, looking SE from 1st and Hill c. 1886-7. In the upper
right corner, below "Organs," is LA's first synagogue, completed on Fort St. in 1873:

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...id/898/rec/264

Another c. 1886-87 photo, looking SW from the Nadeau, showing the front of the Millar Block, which I guess is technically three stories if you count the little room in the turret. The building
being built on the SW corner of 2nd and Fort, the California Bank Building, will have a big "1887" high up on the 2nd Street side.

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...d/1762/rec/188

But Millar wasn't satisfied with his building:

August 7 1887 LA Times

Here is 37-39 S. Fort with four stories (plus an addition in the rear, replacing the wooden porch), taken from City Hall c. 1888-90
(the city ordinance eliminating street numbers below 100 was signed by Mayor Hazard on December 21, 1889). The 1887 California
Bank Building dominates the foreground. See the name on the building at top right? Was "Seymour Johnson" a double-entendre
back then, too?:

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si.../17808/rec/515

Sadly, it was around this time that Mrs. Millar passed away:

February 20, 1888 LA Herald @ LOC -- http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lc...arRange&page=1

Mrs. Millar's brother George D. Rowan went into business with Mr. Millar (and apparently was not the stereotypical lunkhead brother-in-law, given his biographies, which refer to his
father as James, not George B. as in his sister's obit above). George D. Rowan's son, Robert A. Rowan, was Rowan of the Rowan-Bilicke Fireproof Building Company, which built
fireproof buildings that were absolutely fireproof, like the Alexandria Hotel, shown here in 1906:

CA State Library -- http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...I4ED2JCXUE.jpg

Info:
http://books.google.com/books?id=YMU...ngeles&f=false
http://books.google.com/books?id=j-I...eproof&f=false
http://books.google.com/books?id=j-I...ngeles&f=false
http://www.rmslusitania.info/people/...lbert-bilicke/

Mr. Millar remarried -- to a Lily -- but in time, Death came for him, too:

Simmon's Spice Mill, December 1916 (Spice Mill Publishing Company, New York) @ http://books.google.com/books?id=l-s...epage&q&f=true

Here are the Millar Block and its neighbors, c. 1904-5. The C. H. Frost Building would later become the Haig M. Prince Building:

USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...d/1745/rec/330

By 1906 the Millar Block had been renamed the Roanoke Building:

1906 Sanborn @ LAPL

You can see the top two stories of 137-139 S. Broadway in this February 23, 1909, photo looking west from 2nd and Spring:

LOC -- http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource...a18032/?co=pan (previously posted by gsjansen: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=1337)

We have to fast-forward to February 24, 1952, for the next good -- and one of the best -- shots of the Millar Block:

Indiana University Archives -- http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/cush...se&pnum=P05738

But, as you may have already surmised, even with those two lions roaring defiantly out of the facade, time was running out for 137-39 S. Broadway. This photo is dated 1963; note the
lamp post in front of the building:

CA State Library -- http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...IER3EUP79J.jpg

This photo is dated June 1961 and looks at the NW corner of 2nd and Broadway -- so either it or the previous photo is misdated. At any rate, the Millar Block would have been across
the street from the green flag, behind the lamp post:

Huntington Digital Library -- http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/6280/rec/186

And 50 years later, what does the NW corner of 2nd and Broadway look like?

GSV

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Dec 26, 2018 at 4:59 AM. Reason: stupid photobucket + add note about photo
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  #20375  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 1:19 PM
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The old and the new....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas View Post
Good thing you were there to witness what took place. I still find it interesting there is no mention of saving what they did anywhere on the Internet. Admittedly I didn't get into doing a search of newspaper archives.

When looking at what they did it's really difficult to imagine parts of the old structure were incorporated into the new, especially since they literally enveloped the old with new and totally changed the exterior appearance of what can be seen of the old.
As I watched this bizarre building episode unfold, it appeared that they took most of the exterior cladding off of the tower and replaced it with a new metal facade. The original 1932 steel frames remained firmly in place. Then they added the new north-side auditorium and the new in-the-round theater on the south-side.....of course leaving the original theatrical rigging tower and original stage in the middle. The new theaters occupy the exact same footprint that they did in 1932.

This process is common in Los Angeles. The builders will remove the original brick and stone exterior. This exposes the original steel framing. Next, they attach steel panels to the old framing and now we have a ''new'' building.

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  #20376  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 3:28 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
As I watched this bizarre building episode unfold, it appeared that they took most of the exterior cladding off of the tower and replaced it with a new metal facade. The original 1932 steel frames remained firmly in place. Then they added the new north-side auditorium and the new in-the-round theater on the south-side.....of course leaving the original theatrical rigging tower and original stage in the middle. The new theaters occupy the exact same footprint that they did in 1932.

This process is common in Los Angeles. The builders will remove the original brick and stone exterior. This exposes the original steel framing. Next, they attach steel panels to the old framing and now we have a ''new'' building.

It's hard to quarrel with the "re-skinning" of an old structure provided there is integrity in a building's foundation and in the doing interior utility services are upgraded to current codes. The main problem I see with many old buildings of five or fewer floors would be that many may have wooden floors and still remain a fire hazard.

Utilities upgrading is very important as they have recently found out in New York with two old apartment buildings blowing to heck and gone from a gas leak. Of course it took pretty much idiots to run natural gas through cast iron pipe in the first place given the porous nature of cast iron. In that case 127 year old cast iron.

When it came to the old Long Beach Municipal Auditorium in my view the building had an elegance that the new does not appear to equal. I think if I had been doing the project I might have found a way simply replace the middle and retained the elegance. Nothing like improving to common, uninspired Blah.
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  #20377  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 3:38 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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FlyingW/Millar



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckaluck View Post

If anyone's interested, "Of Mice and Men" was released in - 1939
http://www.pacificelectric.org/wp-co...ch-4-18-39.jpg







Hotel Schuyler, Long Beach

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MzQ1WDUyNA...dS2cQp/$_3.JPG



http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTI2WDgwMA...hS0zPv/$_3.JPG


http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/OTYwWDEyOD...KZ!~~60_57.JPG



http://images.auctionhelper.com/imag...113/113139.jpg




11-11-1922 Armistice Day. - http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/ref/co...0coll2/id/4382







Lord & Taylor having an unannounced sale?







Buffums and Football
















Last edited by BifRayRock; Mar 20, 2014 at 3:56 PM.
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  #20378  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 4:20 PM
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Olive Court and the view from the Melrose, 1914


Looking east from the Melrose, 1914

Stitched together two nice C.C. Pierce negatives shot from the roof (or upper floor) of The Melrose (at about 128 S. Grand in the ugly new building). County Courthouse tower visible over the top of the new Hall of Records, crenelated tower of the Los Angeles Times building at 1st and Broadway. Row of buildings at the bottom of the image all address on Olive street. Far left bottom is the St. Mark Hotel (originally the Cecil and soon to be the Gladden, in three years it will become the home address of a local oil company accountant and soon to be struggling writer named Raymond Chandler) at 100 S. Olive. Next to the St. Mark/Cecil/Gladden is the northern entrance to Olive Court, albeit hidden by that tree, over to the right you can see the southern entrance to Olive Court and at the far right (bottom corner) is the Argyle. You will notice that by 1914 The Annex (133 S. Hill Street) has been torn down, leaving the Hotel Locke (behind the Argyle and directly behind that star pine) at 139 S. Hill Street (NW corner of 2nd) out on the point overlooking 2nd and Hill street all alone. Now we have a clear view of the Moore Cliff Apartment/Hotel (center, stark white, drab, featureless multi-story) and to the left the smaller, more architecturally interesting El Moro Hotel. Both the El Moro and the Moore Cliff address on Hill Street (109 and 121 respectively) yet are served by entrances here on Olive Court.

USC digital archive/Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection, 1860-1960 (chs-5711, 5712)
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  #20379  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 6:23 PM
Mike E Mike E is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
Anecdotally, the late Municipal Auditorium, pictured below, was far more than a '30s movie palace.
"The fill for the auditorium and the Rainbow Pier was begun October 1928 and completed in December 1930. Only then, could the $2.8 million Long Beach Municipal Auditorium, which was financed through a bond issue, be built.

It was completed in late 1931 and officially opened on March 6, 1932. It was mainly a convention center for tournaments, dog shows, tennis matches, fashion shows, auto shows, rabbit shows and American Legion conventions. The biggest crowds have been credited to Jehovah Witness meetings, which now are held in the newer convention center which replaced it.

In March 1947, famed show pianist Liberace supposedly made his stage debut a the Municipal Auditorium as a benefit for the White Shrine as is known as the 'Liberace world tour inaugural' complete with 500 custom pressings of “Warsaw Concerto” and “The Fire Dance,” which were autographed and sold as souvenirs." http://longbeachhistory.wordpress.co...gory/theaters/
Alas, I have been proven wrong in the past.
The Beach Boys also made their first paid appearance here on December 31, 1961. They opened for Ike and Tina Turner at the "Richie Valens Memorial Dance and Show" and recieved $60. I saw Brian Wilson do a show at the current venue at this location about 5 years ago but didn't know it was the same actual stage area.

Last edited by Mike E; Mar 20, 2014 at 11:01 PM.
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  #20380  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2014, 6:34 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Thoroughly enjoyed your post on the Millar/Roanoke building Flyingwedge.


I didn't notice the lions heads until you pointed them out.



...and I had to chuckle at the haphazard way they boarded up the front door.

__


and...
Excellent photographs & postcards of the Hotel Schuyler BifRayRock.
__
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