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  #46121  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 9:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsjansen View Post
it seems that the Los Angeles Public Library keeps adding new photographic finds to the library. I can swear that these photos were not there yesterday when i came upon the Singleton Court photo that i had posted.......of course i could be wrong........................

Exterior side view of the General Charles Longstreet Victorian style home and driveway at 2424 South Flower Street, Los Angeles. At the death of General Longstreet, it passed into the hands of John Singleton, a famous mining man, owner of the Yellow Aster Mine. It later became the location of Los Angeles Orthopaedic Hospital.


Source: LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics24/00061623.jpg

John Singleton's residence, a Colonial revival style home named "Singleton Court," located at 2400 South Flower Street in Los Angeles. There are people and a dog on the porch. Singleton was president of the Yellow Aster Mining Co., Randsburg, and a well-known horseman.


Source: LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics24/00061758.jpg

John Singleton's residence looks majestic with its Colossal, Doric columns. A Colonial revival style home named "Singleton Court", it is located at 2400 S. Flower in Los Angeles.


Source: LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics24/00061730.jpg

A view of the gated entrance to John Singleton's residence. A Colonial revival style home named "Singleton Court". It is located at 2400 S. Flower in Los Angeles.


Source: LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics24/00061731.jpg

Exterior view of the stable at John Singleton's residence, named "Singleton Court," located at 2400 South Flower Street in Los Angeles. The metal gate is seen, as well as a double line of palm trees planted by previous propoerty owner General longstreet.


Source: LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics24/00061747.jpg

Exterior view of the stable at John Singleton's residence, named "Singleton Court," located at 2400 South Flower Street in Los Angeles. Apparently Singleton maintained a fine stable of trotters. The home burned prior to 1918 and was totally destroyed, leaving only the fine old brick stable, which was converted into a clinic for the hospital maintained by the Los Angeles Orthopaedic Foundation. A later owner, John Brockman, had deeded the 3-1/2 acre site to them around 1918. The stable's clock was moved to Brockman's estate in Glendale.


Source: LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics24/00061749.jpg
Thanks for the above terrific post, gsjansen!

I realize that the post above is nearly 8 years old(!), but I did a search of this thread for "Longstreet", and yours was the only post not about the Longstreet palms.

I found the following photo ("Residence of Lucy[?] Longstreet, West Adams Street, Los Angeles, ca.1900") while going through my hard drive, and I had to know where this building once stood. Thanks to your post, I now know.

Truly an amazing photo, and, to my eyes at least, looking so-very-unlike the type of buildings we usually see in old time LA. Engaged columns, like on the Farmers and Merchants Bank are one thing, but you seldom see free-standing, load-bearing Greek Doric columns like on the Longstreet porch.

USC
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  #46122  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 10:26 AM
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Amid all the posts about Poundcake Hill and Photoshop skills, I thought it would be a good time to remind everyone of ProphetM's juxtaposition of St Athanasius church in a modern setting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProphetM View Post

OK, per my earlier post, here is my attempt at bringing the St. Athanasius church building forward in time by 120 years.

I decided to keep the utility pole in the foreground, the building at the back of the church which seems like it may be connected, and all the buildings attached at the left which would be lined up along New High Street. The modern building at left is the northwest corner of City Hall. There is still a bit of a hill on that corner so it lined up fairly well. The back end of the church is hanging out onto Spring Street. I lined up the curb on the Temple Street side, although I'd think that with today's wider streets, putting the church on top of the sidewalk would probably be more accurate. I also edited out a couple modern trees in the foreground lawn & sidewalk which would otherwise have looked very weird, being only half-there!

Ta da!

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  #46123  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 10:27 AM
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I found my thrill on Poundcake Hill

Scott, I love your post re Poundcake Hill, because my wife, as an LA County Deputy DA, has spent much of our marriage working on Poundcake Hill. I've even gotten her to call it that.

The funny thing about that dismal building is that, although it's not obvious in the photo, it is actually in a pit when you get to the Broadway side of it. Also, that retaining wall you see lining the sidewalks is made from stones taken from the wall situated in the same place in the old court house.

Her longtime judge in her previous calendar court was formerly a Deputy DA, and he spent his early years in the office working in the Old Hall of Records. He remembers that building fondly, and rues the day it was demolished.

So do I, for that matter.
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  #46124  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 1:37 PM
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Oh, blast it all, here the recent postings have been right up my Calle, and I've missed them all until now.

Here's my usual wall of text (you guys are mostly pic oriented, I'm word oriented. Sorry!). From my notes in re Lachenais (note spelling) etc.:

Lachenais, Armand Michel Josef usually called Michel alias Michael; ca. 1827, born in France; lived about at what would be the northeast corner of Main and 4th Sts., also owning a farm south of the city; December 8, 1859, married Maria de la Encarnacion Reyes at Plaza church; 1860, present in L.A. as a farm laborer with savings of $200 and real estate valued at $2,000; September 30, 1861, shot Henry Delaval dead, at a wake, thereafter eluding the authorities and living in Baja California for a time; February, 1866, surrendered to Deputy Henderson, tried, acquitted; mid-December, 1870, shot and killed farm-neighbor Jacob Bell in a dispute either over water from the zanja, or over ownership of Bell’s property; December 17, 1870, lynched at Tomlinson’s Corral by the Vigilance Committee led by Felix Signoret, “a Methodist mob” according to H. Bell, who states that “the pastor of what is now called the First Methodist Church marched at the head [of the mob] with a double-barreled shotgun resting in the hollow of his left arm”, said pastor evidently being Asahel M. Hough. edit add: I can add that Maria de la Encarnacion Reyes was of the Reyes family prominent in L.A. history.

Tomlinson’s Corral most familiar name for a corral which was owned by Tomlinson for no more than five years; location, northeast corner of Temple and Justicia/Buena Vista; the cross-beam over the gate was a frequent site of lynchings; the corral was evidently where ca. 1853 the Indians prostrated from the weekend debauch would be herded on Sunday night and then “sold” next morning for a week’s labor in the vineyards or wherever; evidently, also previous to Tomlinson’s ownership, Jonathan Temple’s corral behind Temple’s residence (at the old Temple Block northwest of the junction of Spring, Temple, and Main streets; see Benjamin S. Eaton) as well as, by December, 1863, Phineas Banning’s corral; it is unclear when it came into Tomlinson’s ownership (Tomlinson died in 1868).

Seems to me I mentioned Temple's corral the other week, I think in connection with the beginnings of Temple St.

The cross-beam of Tomlinson's Corral also came into use during the Chinese Massacre . . . which is more significant than one might realize at first. Looking at the Rendall/Godfrey shot in FW's post, you'll note the Bilderrain home right across the street. Quoth me, "The spelling of this distinguished family’s name much varies, and seems to be what is intended by Belderrain, Baudaraya, Vildoraya, Veldaray, Baldaraya, Balderrama, de Bilderrais, and even Balderris and Balderez; the Bilderrain home was long at the northwest corner of Buena Vista (Justicia) and Temple Sts." Now to the point: Jesus Bilderrain:

Bilderrain, Jesus ca. 1840-1846, born in Mexico; father, Jose Ygnacio Bilderrain; 1850, present in L.A.; 1860, present in L.A. as a druggist with savings of $200; October 24, 1871, as a policeman, wounded attempting to arrest a Chinese in the strife preceding the Chinese Massacre, possibly the “gambler that was connected with the police department” whom H. Bell mentions; four children with one Ramona Alvarado: Ygnacia, Antonio Fabiano, Jose, Encarnacion; 1879 to at least 1886, living in Pomona; 1887, evidently in L.A., allegedly providing money to buy votes for the Democrat candidates at the White House polling place (*LAT:3/13/1887 et seq.), and otherwise meddling with voting in the company of “Abbott, the opium-fiend” (evidently John Abbott), his “duster” or long coat of linen apparently showing the outlines in its bulging pockets the coinage he had to distribute, a policeman stating that this was Bilderrain’s customary attire on voting days; 1895, arraigned for battery (*LAT:6/8/1895), ultimately dismissed because the complainant had received satisfaction. [I could extend this indefinitely if I wanted to start talking about the Abbots, mentioned above.]

Thus we see, Jesus Bilderrain was centrally involved (wounded) in the incident which sparked the Chinese Massacre . . . and some of the massacre victims (the first ones?) were hanged at the Tomlinson Corral cross-beam part of the motivation for that location being used likely being that the home of the aggrieved Bilderrains was directly across the street. I don't believe history has noted this before.

Now y'all can rest your eyes.

Last edited by odinthor; Mar 25, 2018 at 2:09 PM. Reason: Better wording; also, about Reyes.
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  #46125  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 2:44 PM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Charles View Post

[snip]

And of course, an actual poundcake is circular, not rectangular.

[/IMG]
Er, beg to differ. A lot of them, especially back in that time, were baked in bread pans and had the shape of a loaf of bread. The round and Bundt pans, I think, were a lot later.

My mother baked all hers in a bread pan.

Cheers,

Earl
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  #46126  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 3:48 PM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
[...]I also came across the Chinese Massacre while looking for information on the Lacherais lynching. (which happened a year before the massacre)
I don't remember if anyone has posted an in-depth look at the massacre.
__
Oh, my. My second wall of text today. You have a lot to answer for, e_r! From my notes (this time, just for fun, I'll show you my notes "as is," rather than cleaning up my little indications and references hieroglyphics, just so y'all can see what they look like in my original; "ev." means "evidently"):

Chinese Massacre details vary concerning this affair depending upon the person reporting, but the general outlines are clear; as background, first let us note in our entries above under heading Chinese, the public irritations of 1869 and 1870, as well as that competing tongs dominated the respective opposing lines of buildings on the east side and west side of Calle de los Negros; October 21, 1871, conflict in the Calle de los Negros area between two tongs over the abduction of a woman to Santa Barbara (or perhaps San Diego), Yo Hing being head of one tong, Ah Choy being the offending member of another tong; J.P. Widney recalled that Chinese domestics had been mentioning an upcoming “war” and noted that gunsmiths were selling out of their wares to the Chinese in the weeks preceding; the tong losing the woman had a warrant issued for her arrest on an accusation of stealing jewelry, and she was arrested and returned to L.A.; as the vehicle conveying her to jail approached its destination in L.A., a mob of armed Chinese from both tongs gathered in the street, violence being averted only by the exertions of the city marshal’s tiny police force; October 23, 1871, Ah Choy was arrested on the complaint of Yo Hing and, morning of the 24th, released by Judge W.H. Gray on bail, the bond being provided by Sam Yung; afternoon, complaint sworn out against Sam Yung, ev. concerning disturbing the peace; about 4 o’clock p.m. October 24, 1871, conflict began anew, ev. with the attempt, perhaps by Robert Thompson (who had just retired from the police force), or perhaps by policeman Jesus Bilderrain seconded by Thompson, or perhaps by Thompson ultimately seconded by Bilderrain (see below), to serve the warrant upon Yung at his store in the old Coronel adobe at the northwest corner of Calle de los Negros and Los Angeles St. (Workman notes “The adobe, which was bounded on all four sides by alleys or streets, was Chinese headquarters”; at some point, it was also “Tao’s Gambling House”); police (Jesus Bilderrain) responded, with the assistance of citizens (Bilderrain’s 15-year-old brother, among others), Thompson being shot to death by a Chinese, perhaps Sam Yung, in the store, with Jesus Bilderrain being wounded in the shoulder, some bystanders such as the boy “Juan Jose Mendible” (perhaps our Jose Mendiblez) being wounded as well by other gun-wielding Chinese; by 4:30 or 5, October 24, 1871, a frenzied and armed mob of about a thousand “of the scum and dregs of the city” (*HN), or indeed 3,000 (*W), assembled around Calle de los Negros, the Plaza, and Los Angeles St., at which point a Chinese armed with a hatchet was observed trying to escape across Los Angeles St., only to be captured by Romo Sortorel; policeman Emil Harris rescued the Chinese, who later however was then re-taken by part of the mob and lynched at Tomlinson’s Corral; a shot was heard about this time—from which side?—which triggered an onslaught of gunfire from the crowd towards the adobe; meantime, other Chinese were being taken and hanged near Goller’s wagon shop, at the southwest corner of Los Angeles St. and Commercial St., between up-ended wagons or from the cross-beam of a gateway, nearby hardware shop owner John D. Hicks evidently turning the event to a profit by selling rope to the lynchers; another nineteen were lynched in front of Slaney’s boot store at another corner (or perhaps the same corner) of L.A. St. and Commercial; yet more were hanged from the crossbeam at the entrance to the Tomlinson corral at Justicia and Temple Sts.; the authorities (Sheriff Burns [late to arrive], A.J. King [who wounded himself preparing for the conflict]) and those seeking to maintain calm (Emil Harris [as above], Henry Hazard [insufficiently persuasive to the crowd], R.M. Widney as president of the Law and Order party, J.P. Widney) were largely unsuccessful in their efforts, though Slaney was able to save his Chinese employees by locking them in his store, and twenty-one Chinese were lodged in jail for safe-keeping through the efforts of the Widneys and their assistants; during the mêlée, Mayor Cristobal Aguilar supposedly rode up, surveyed the scene, and quietly rode away; October 25, 1871, coroner’s inquest concerning the “twenty-two or more victims” (*HN); August 2, 1872, four Chinese priests from San Francisco came to conduct lamentation services; “There are certain persons in Los Angeles who were helping to murder Chinamen that night who hold their heads high to-day [1889]” (*Ill:250)*Ill, *HN, *HB2, *W; see also entries for those named above, plus those for Henry C. Austin, John M. Baldwin, George W. Barter, William R. Bettis, Botello, S.B. Caswell, John Downey, James Goldworthy, Gray, John D. Hicks, Joseph Kurtz, J. Lazarovich, Harris Newmark, Cameron E. Thom, C. White, W.W. Widney; further dramatic reading in Overland Monthly (1886, p.231 ff.), how faithful to truth, we cannot say; J.P. Widney’s calm but indignant response to Bancroft’s version will be found in the Los Angeles Times of July 23, 1888.

Thus, the entry in my notes. Seems to me that I tracked down a list of the victims; but I haven't added it to the entry yet.

Last edited by odinthor; Mar 25, 2018 at 4:10 PM. Reason: Fix typo; delete extraneity.
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  #46127  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 4:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
This portion of the 1869 Rendall/Godfrey panorama looks in almost the opposite direction as the lynching photos. I've
drawn a line showing where I think the lynching photos were taken from. We see the two gates and the corner of the
adobe wall with the wooden roof (#66 near the lower right corner of the photo is "adobe wall with wooden roof").
Above the lower right corner (to the right of #10) is a tiny bit of the rear of St. Athanasius Church on the SW corner
of Temple and New High Streets; the church would have been just out of view to the left in the first lynching photo:


CHS-7179 @USCDL
EXCELLENT EYE Flyingwedge!

Quote:
Originally Posted by USC
"A crowd gathers around the gate to the lumber yard."
Now I see why USC described the site as a lumberyard.

_
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  #46128  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 4:43 PM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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Originally Posted by Scott Charles View Post
Thanks for the above terrific post, gsjansen!

I realize that the post above is nearly 8 years old(!), but I did a search of this thread for "Longstreet", and yours was the only post not about the Longstreet palms.
Did I see Glendale in the quoted piece, why yes I did! It's hard to get a good picture of the ol' clock tower unless you want to wander up the owner's driveway(and that would be wrong), but here's the view from the street:

20150417_190313_Richtone(HDR).jpg by BillinGlendaleCA, on Flickr
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  #46129  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 4:52 PM
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Beautiful photograph Bill! you chose the pefect time of day.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 25, 2018 at 11:11 PM.
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  #46130  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 10:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Another photograph from 'Devils Walk' lady. (her green fingernail is visible at left)

Broadway Tunnel 1926

ebay

There appears to be a small building or two behind the John T. Dye billboards (notice the smoking flue).
__
I have to admit - I appreciate the authenticity of the distortions.

And who's to say - gravity may have been a bit different in the 1920's.
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  #46131  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 11:00 PM
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I have to admit - I appreciate the authenticity of the distortions.

But tell us how you feel about the green fingernail Lwize.




KIDDING

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 25, 2018 at 11:42 PM.
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  #46132  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2018, 11:23 PM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Beautiful photograph Bill! you chose the pefect time of day.
Thanks, I was looking at the Googlemobile and it appears that the portion of the drive up to the gate is a public road. I'll have to revisit(it's a nice walk) and I have a better camera now.
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  #46133  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 12:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Otis Criblecoblis View Post
Scott, I love your post re Poundcake Hill, because my wife, as an LA County Deputy DA, has spent much of our marriage working on Poundcake Hill. I've even gotten her to call it that.

The funny thing about that dismal building is that, although it's not obvious in the photo, it is actually in a pit when you get to the Broadway side of it. Also, that retaining wall you see lining the sidewalks is made from stones taken from the wall situated in the same place in the old court house.

Her longtime judge in her previous calendar court was formerly a Deputy DA, and he spent his early years in the office working in the Old Hall of Records. He remembers that building fondly, and rues the day it was demolished.

So do I, for that matter.
Thanks, Otis! So many beautiful buildings back then, and so few of them left. It's heartbreaking.

Very cool to know about the stones in the retaining wall - I actually wondered about that, as they look so similar to the old Court House.
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  #46134  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 1:36 AM
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And remember, a portion of the old courthouse red sandstone blocks
ended up at the Ladera Park Senior Center along W. 62nd west of S. La Brea.

SKYSCRAPERPAGE]

GOOGLE MAPS

Check it out HERE (be sure to look in front of the pick-up truck as well)





I don't believe we ever figured out how, or why, the redstone blocks ended up at this location. [the full address is 4750 W. 62nd Street]

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 26, 2018 at 2:07 AM.
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  #46135  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 1:47 AM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Charles View Post
Thanks, Otis! So many beautiful buildings back then, and so few of them left. It's heartbreaking.

Very cool to know about the stones in the retaining wall - I actually wondered about that, as they look so similar to the old Court House.
In addition to the stones from the retaining wall, there's this:
_B030221.jpg by BillinGlindaleCA, on Flickr
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  #46136  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 2:13 AM
BillinGlendaleCA BillinGlendaleCA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
And remember, a portion of the old courthouse red sandstone blocks
ended up at the Ladera Park Senior Center along W. 62nd west of S. La Brea.


Check it out HERE (be sure to look in front of the pick-up truck as well)





I don't believe we ever figured out how, or why, the redstone blocks ended up at this location. [the full address is 4750 W. 62nd Street]
There are also some in City Terrace Park in East LA on Hazard.
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  #46137  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 3:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Charles View Post
Truly an amazing photo, and, to my eyes at least, looking so-very-unlike the type of buildings we usually see in old time LA. Engaged columns, like on the Farmers and Merchants Bank are one thing, but you seldom see free-standing, load-bearing Greek Doric columns like on the Longstreet porch.

USC

Well since we're on the subject, let me a toss a couple out there. Of course these are not of similar vintage (about twenty years later), or built for similar purpose (apartments and not single-family home) and certainly not of that wonderful elegant Greek Doric but—

nhm
505-511 N Bunker Hill

nhm
Colonial Apts, 314 South Grand, ca. 1902

calstatelib
Alta Vista, 255 S Bunker Hill, 1902

mine
The Nugent, 257 S Grand, Robert E Nelson, 1903

mine
The Touraine, 447 S Hope, AL Haley, 1903

cal state library
The Marcella, 223 S Flower, Garrett & Bixby, 1904


csl
The Carleton, 236 N Grand, W C Dickerson, 1905


Majestic Apts, 700 W First, Milan Holmes, 1905 lapl

nhm
The Ryer, 321 S Grand, Fred Dorn, 1904

Again, you'll notice there's no Doric involved—save perhaps for the Maxine (722 W First, Garrett & Bixby, 1911):

lapl

But this is a later shot, and I'm not altogether sold that it wasn't originally Corinthian, and remodeled this way, as happened (like so) to a few other structures.
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  #46138  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 3:21 AM
Mstimc Mstimc is offline
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Just FYI, the American Heroes Channel (spinoff of the History Channel) had a very good episode of "Wartime Crime" on the Zoot Suit Riots. Did a nice job explaining the locations with quite a few then/now location shots. And also an honest discussion of just how discriminatory L.A. (and California) was in the first half of the 20th century. And some very noir period photos, too!
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  #46139  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 3:37 AM
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Originally Posted by ScottyB View Post
Don't know if this provides any clarity on hills, but an interesting view from the Courthouse looking W.....I think that would be Temple running from the viewer, but please enlighten me anyone- what is the large building at the upper right of the photo? And, interesting to see the derricks on what I think is Bunker Hill (again, correct me if I'm wrong!).


CSL
The oil derricks are west of Bunker Hill, more or less in the area around Court and Toluca Streets, I guess. At upper right
must be the Sisters' Hospital aka Los Angeles Infirmary.


The Seaver Center says this photo of Sisters' Hospital, looking at the front of the building, was taken in 1886:



"The Sisters Hospital" @ Seaver Center


1888 Sanborn:



ProQuest via LAPL


Here's a photo of Sisters' Hospital that I don't think we've seen before. It is dated c. 1886-90 and looks SE from N. Beaudry
down at the hospital on the right. The west sides of Fort Moore Hill and Bunker Hill are visible in the distance:



486753 @ Huntington Digital Library


This is a close-up from the above photo. I have placed a red dot over what I believe is the F. U. Berke residence
at the NW corner of 2nd Street and Bunker Hill Avenue:




Below is the hospital on the 1906 Sanborn. I believe the angled wing at the top was built in 1901-02. The BLVD marked
at lower left is Sunset Blvd. I think what's marked N. Beaudry here (and on the 1888 map) is now White Knoll Drive:



ProQuest via LAPL



This postcard view shows the 1901-02 wing (I believe the hospital was remodeled at the same time) from Sunset Blvd.:

Quote:
Originally Posted by westcork View Post


Cardcow

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Mar 26, 2018 at 6:12 AM. Reason: add image, rewrite and rearrange stuff
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  #46140  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2018, 3:54 AM
ProphetM ProphetM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillinGlendaleCA View Post
There are also some in City Terrace Park in East LA on Hazard.
There are also some in a house, on Mills Ave. in Claremont. There is a small historic area called the Russian Village District, with homes built of recycled materials in the 1930s. 345 S. Mills Ave. contains red sandstone from the courthouse. Google Street View can give you just a tiny glimpse of it, as there is a lot of foliage in the way.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Village_District
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