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  #16381  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 1:42 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post

All I can say is wow BifRay. These are exciting photos. Got any more?




A little off the beaten noir path, but I think we got lucky with the galloping horses. Probably got the horses on the first and only take! An alternative caption? Pizza's ready!

Here's a shot of "the gang" at the station. They have "a look" that suggests, except for when it was absolutely necessary, they excelled at energy conservation and food tasting.
http://www.lafire.com/stations/FS014..._crew_1500.jpg

1915 - Station Company No. 14, Demonstration of more energy conservation?
http://www.lafire.com/stations/FS014...ngOut_1500.jpg

1911 - Resting, but ready for action!
http://www.lafire.com/stations/FS014...gon14_1500.jpg

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  #16382  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 2:51 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by Albany NY View Post

oooOOOoooh! Good ol' Goodwin was deliciously noirish!




Except for the fact that Sister Aimee stayed in Nat's former home, any other connection [as suggested by the same style printing on the photographs] between the two is incredibly remote. http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...g=3619,4351374 When I started reading the obit, I was expecting a miracle of some sort, but no such luck. Must have been bad timing. Time for a rewrite?


Maybe someone can provide more information for the unrelated "Goodwin Building?" Attributed to the same firm that responsible for the Wiltern, the Chapman Market, the Richfield Building and so many more, Morgan Walls & Clements. I recognize the photos, but the location has eluded me. (Commonwealth?) (Pasadena?) Seems too well polished to have avoided attention on this thread. The wrought iron reminds me of downtown too. The only thing I can add is that the reported dates for these photos is 1925. One of the shots has a nearby Hotel Sign that is difficult for me to discern. Seven letters, beginning with "P"?? Same with street signs. Directory has more listings for Goodwin than I have patience.


http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...5JMKVS38SG.jpg

http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...N9DGV93ISP.jpg


http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...MT5KFQHSRH.jpg


http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...SNS3T5J22J.jpg


http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...H3GYJ95NGH.jpg


http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...18VF4DYT4A.jpg


Can't resist. Wilshire and Hauser Ralphs GONE!
http://miraclemilela.files.wordpress...s-clements.jpg



Last edited by BifRayRock; Aug 29, 2013 at 5:38 AM.
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  #16383  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 3:34 AM
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My sincerest apologies

Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
[COLOR="Indigo"][SIZE="2"][FONT="Tahoma"]


Except for the fact that Sister Aimee stayed in Nat's former home, any other connection between the two is incredibly remote. http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...g=3619,4351374 When I started reading the obit, I was expecting a miracle of some sort, but no such luck. Must have been bad timing. Time for a rewrite?
Gosh, BifRayRock, I'm mighty sorry to have bothered you with an article about Nat's passing. I didn't realize we were only allowed to post things directly related to Aimee. Perhaps if you posted a list of exactly what items you personally find appealing, it will help the rest of us post only things that you will like. Personally, I found the article quite interesting, and it made me want to learn more about this colorful character. My bad. Don't worry....I promise not to bother you again. In fact, if my misguided posts aren't welcome here, just say so. I wouldn't want to cramp anyone's style.
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  #16384  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 4:45 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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>*<

Last edited by BifRayRock; Sep 2, 2013 at 4:24 PM.
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  #16385  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 4:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Albany NY View Post
Originally posted by Tourmaline

April '27 - The "late" Nat Goodwin's home in Santa Monica, where Aimee allegedly spent some time. Nat died in '19, so his connection with Aimee was extremely attenuated. http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...g=3619,4351374 Exact address unknown.
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics10/00024540.jpg

The Santa Monica Public Library lists Nat Goodwin's house at 2501 Ocean Front. Assuming they meant Ocean Front Walk, it appears that the section of the walk that included Goodwin's home is no more. It dosen't match up with any current address on Ocean Avenue, either. So I guess we found the ADDRESS, but can anyone find the LOCATION?

SMPL
Totally cool-looking house. But I'm sure the old eyesore was replaced by a much better-looking parking lot or strip mall.
The area has changed quite a bit; I think the former Goodwin house has been replaced by a street.

Here's 2501 Ocean Front on the 1918 Santa Monica Sanborn Map [and thanks to JS and MR for BLSM = Blacksmith], just above (Ocean:

LAPL

In this 1952 aerial view, I've drawn a red line in front of 2501 Ocean Front @ Hart. Speedway ends two blocks north of Hart at Hollister; Ocean Avenue also ends at Hollister just east of Speedway:

Historical Aerials.com -- http://www.historicaerials.com/

But by 1972, everything west of Speedway had been demolished. At Hollister, Ocean Avenue now turns into angled Barnard Way:

Historical Aerials.com -- http://www.historicaerials.com/
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  #16386  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 7:42 AM
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Always ready to ride....

Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post



A little off the beaten noir path, but I think we got lucky with the galloping horses. Probably got the horses on the first and only take! An alternative caption? Pizza's ready!



1911 - Resting, but ready for action!
http://www.lafire.com/stations/FS014...gon14_1500.jpg

Those are healthy horses of the Morgan breed. Often when the old fire engine horses were retired out to pasture, from blocks away they would hear the fire bell and run to the station house, ready to pull the wagon. The bell meant "get ready to be in harness". This was how loyal they were.

On a cool day 50 MPH was easy for these horses when pulling the 6000 lb steamer pump. They would always use the best horses for the pump engine.

I don't see a coach dog or what was a more common name, Dalmation. These 60 lb dogs were used to guard the ladder wagon from theft and to keep the horses calm during the excitement of the fire. The fire-ladder wagon was loaded with attractive brass items that were easy pickings for boys looking for a souvenir.


Engine Co. 9...Los Angeles
LAFDHistorical
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  #16387  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 4:05 PM
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.................................................

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Oct 1, 2014 at 1:47 PM.
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  #16388  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 4:47 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Retro-future Los Angeles, February 1953. I love this illustration (notice that it says Figueroa on the monorail car)


ebay

I am not sure why a Conoco motor oil ad is emphasizing mass transit. Am I missing something?
__
I know the question was asked nearly a year ago, but having lifelong connections with the oil industry I couldn't resist answering.

In 1953 there was a glut of gasoline because of there never being a yield of less than 15-17 gallons of gasoline from refining a barrel of oil. Believe it or not, gasoline was considered more of a nuisance waste by-product from refining for lubricants and feed stocks for various chemical products such as paints, plastics, fertilizers, and pesticides. Many 100s of thousands gallons of gasoline were flared off daily around the country just to get rid of it. What consumers were paying at the pump was little more than transportation costs to get it to retailers, taxes, and a few cents per gallon for the station operator. In other words the oil companies at the time just didn't see the consumption of gasoline ever being equal to its incidental production. Of course the Interstate Highways and urban freeways changed all of that kind of thinking by the time the decade of the 1950s ended.

Last edited by Retired_in_Texas; Aug 29, 2013 at 5:21 PM.
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  #16389  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 5:06 PM
drumhedd drumhedd is offline
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I used to live in the apt building on Manhattan Pl. It was built sometime back in the 1920's and was originally a hotel from what my former landlord told me. Its a really pretty building inside, but is in dire need of restoration. The apts have beautiful archways inside of them and are fairly good sized studios and 1 beds. What a treat to know Sister Aimee used to live next door to me!
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  #16390  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 5:14 PM
3940dxer 3940dxer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alanlutz View Post
Sometimes I wish this forum had a "like" button. There are so many great posts I would LOVE to at least acknowledge but I can't without having to "reply with Quote" or otherwise use a quick quote, which is not attached to the original message and is often overlooked or ignored. Likewise, something I post may be "liked" by some of you out there, but ignored completely because no one takes the time to acknowledge or you've already moved on to the next big thing. Just Sayin'
After discovering this thread, one thing that kept bringing me back (and motivated me to contribute) was the polite, almost genteel feel of Noirish Los Angeles. It seemed that the participants, besides honoring L.A.'s grand eras in image, behaved with a gentility that recalled the era at its best. I like that e_r frequently thanks participants and welcomes newcomers, and enjoy seeing others give props when they like a topic. To me, replies of thanks are an important and enjoyable part of the thread. (Providing they don't copy a bunch big, recent images. )

As I work my way through the late page 600's of this thread, my own thanks go to BifRayRock. I've especially enjoyed many of his posts in that part of the thread, especially his wacky restaurant and retailing contributions. BRR, I have no idea how find this stuff, but nice work!

BTW, pursuing the ghost geography of Lookout Mountain Inn with Lorendoc was great fun and a tremendous (if humbling) learning experience. I used to think I was pretty good with maps and geography…but while I was rubbing two sticks together wondering why nothing made sense, Lorendoc was unearthing old documents downtown and plotting sight lines, to pinpoint the Inn's location. When we scrambled up Wulff's Peak to recreate our "reference" view, everything, including the hills near the Inn, were where he'd said they'd be. Very impressive.

Last edited by 3940dxer; Aug 29, 2013 at 9:24 PM.
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  #16391  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 6:26 PM
jg6544 jg6544 is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post



Bullocks may have been a virtual trailblazer by building as far west as Westmoreland, but others eventually saw the same light, e.g., Magnin's $3,000,000 "taj" at 3240 Wilshire. In Magnin's shadow, was Switzer's at 3250 Wilshire. Walter Switzer evidently started out at 2118 West 7th Street, before packing the covered wagon and moving to where the mighty Wilshire meets the New Hampshire (Avenue). However, Switzer's evidently predated Magnin's by 7 or more years since it was listed in '32, but not in '29. (Magnin's apparently dates from '39) Walter S's Flintridge residence must have been a long commute - even if it was not all bumper to bumper traffic on Vermont.

http://jpg1.lapl.org/00101/00101658.jpg

Switzer had a nicely appointed interior, but not much merchandise - at least in these pictures! Hard to glimpse what was across the street.

Guessing this was early '30s.
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...9EG3B65UCF.jpg
Switzer's interiors reflect a more civilized time when "upscale" stores tried very hard not to look like clearance warehouses (as all stores do today). Interiors of Magnin's or Bullocks Wilshire of the same era would reflect the same aesthetic. In the really elegant departments, you would have found even less merchandise on display. Customers would be referred to a salesperson, who would seat them and bring clothing out, sometimes worn by models, for their review. I very much prefer that to the experience of today, when there is precious little difference between the experience one has at Neiman's and the experience one has at Sears. No 365-day-a-year sales either, which meant people were far more likely to purchase at retail. In today's world, it's no wonder so much shopping is done on the internet.
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  #16392  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 7:54 PM
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Is this picture supposed to show the raising of the first marker? If it's near the Plaza Church I'd expect to be able to recognize some of the buildings in the background, but I can't. Unless it's in the back of the church which might explain it. That whole block, pretty much, is a parking lot now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
On August 15, 1906 the first El Camino Real Bell was installed at the Pueblo De Los Angeles Mission Church near Olvera Street in Los Angeles. It still stands today! In 2004 Caltrans installed 555 of our Mission Bell Markers from South San Francisco to Los Angeles along the El Camino Real and Highway 101.

The El Camino Real Bell is made of cast iron, weighs 85 pounds and is 17 1/2" by 17 1/2" in size.
The Caltrans Mission Bell Marker is 15 1/2' tall. The bottom of the bell measures 11' from the ground.



image: bellcal.
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  #16393  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 8:10 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Originally Posted by rcarlton View Post
This has been touched on before...(curse the search function, but a few new pictures)

The Hollywood Knickerbocker Hotel:

LAPL

View of the Hollywood Knickerbocker Apartment Hotel, located at 1714 Ivar Avenue. In 1923 E. M. Frasier built this 11-story hotel in Spanish Colonial style, which catered to Hollywood's film industry and was home to many stars throughout the years. This historic building began life as a luxury apartment building that was at the heart of Hollywood back in the 1920s, before becoming a hotel later in its history; its slogan was "Your home for a year or a day". It's been linked with tragic deaths and because of this, it is considered haunted by some. Some unfortunate occurrences: D.W. Griffith died of a stroke on July 21, 1948 under the crystal chandelier of the lobby; a costume designer named Irene Gibbons jumped to her death from a hotel window; William Frawley, who lived at the hotel for decades, died of a heart attack on the sidewalk in front of the Knickerbocker. Other stars that frequented the hotel with better luck were: Rudolph Valentino, Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio, Frank Sinatra, Lana Turner, Mae West, and Cecil B. DeMille among many, many others. In 1970 a renovation project converted the hotel into housing for senior citizens and it continues in this capacity today.

LAPL

LAPL

LAPL




And now:
GoogleEarth

GoogleEarth

GoogleEarth

Interesting video: YouTube
If one looks closely at the last two photos and to the left of the hotel you can see the back wall of the now Avalon night club which occupies the theater at times called the Hollywood Playhouse, The WPA Playhouse, The El Capitan, The Hollywood Palace, and the Palace. At some point, probably during the time the theater was used for a Television Studio, or maybe even when the theater was constructed in 1927, there was a tunnel dug that connected the basement of the Nickerbocker to the basement of the theater, enabling personalities staying at the hotel to go to the theater dressing rooms without being seen by the public. While sealed off today, the tunnel still exists. In the days when the theater was the TV Studio for the Milton Berle Show, the Jerry Lewis show, and the Merv Griffin show I would imagine that tunnel was quite busy.
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  #16394  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 8:34 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas View Post
There was a tunnel dug that connected the basement of the Nickerbocker to the basement of the theater, enabling personalities staying at the hotel to go to the theater dressing rooms without being seen by the public. While sealed off today, the tunnel still exists.
note to self: MUST....SEEK....OUT....TUNNEL.
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  #16395  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 8:40 PM
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This is great information! I hope you won't mind me revising my blog content to include it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
Would you believe it was once a fire station?

The January 1924 Culver City Sanborn Map shows the building at SE corner of Motor and National (Palm) with a truss roof, so it matches the structure that's there now:

LAPL

A wider view of the same area from the 1924 map:
From the LAFD historical site, the page on Engine Company 43.

At the time of the 1924 map, the actual firehouse was further west on the south side of National, just beyond the corner property; the space is currently occupied by a milliner (or seamstress?) and a men's hat shop. Possibly the Norm's Fabrics building might have been used for garaging whatever equipment they didn't have room for in the main firehouse.

Quote:

By January 1929, the building had become an auto repair shop:

Culver City Sanborn @ LAPL

The 1950 update shows the building subdivided into stores without any indication as to what they were.

Here's the same corner -- below the "AV." -- on the June 1910 Palms Sanborn Map:

LAPL
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge

What does BLSM stand for?
I think JScott must be correct about it being a smithy. Assuming that Palms operated its own fire service here before annexation and in the days of horse-drawn fire equipment, it seems reasonable to suppose there might have been a blacksmith nearby. From the LAFD site I linked to, though, I'm guessing Company 43 was motorized from inception.
Quote:
P.S. On the 1924 map, our building is marked 18' in several places; on the 1929 map, those numbers have changed to 12'. Did the building lose six feet in height?
It's possible. In this thread we've talked about at least one old building whose upper floors had been removed over the years, and I know of at least one other case at 207 Ord Street in Chinatown, where the first floor of a building from the 1880s still stands; this was originally a multistory "block", as they used to say.
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Last edited by Those Who Squirm!; Aug 30, 2013 at 3:30 AM.
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  #16396  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 10:29 PM
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I am going to briefly return to Catalina Island.

I just came across this informal photograph of vacationers with the first casino and Sugar Loaf in the background.

http://www.oac.cdlib.org/

I like the little girl looking over her shoulder at the photographer.
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  #16397  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 11:15 PM
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A large 'blind' is used to shield the orchestra from the hot sun during rehearsals in 1950. (I had no idea such a thing existed)

Hollywood Bowl/found on an old CD of mine
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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Aug 29, 2013 at 11:26 PM.
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  #16398  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2013, 11:24 PM
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Pacific Electric noir, circa 1958

ebay
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  #16399  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2013, 1:00 AM
3940dxer 3940dxer is offline
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Exploring Santa Fe Avenue, part 2.

Following up on my recent Santa Fe Avenue post, here are a few more shots from that weekend. Presented in monochrome, to capture the Noir mood.


Acme Wiping Materials Co. Filtering waste and sterilized wiping -- why settle for less? 1327 Palmetto Street.




--------------------------------------------------------


Ray's Place at 694 S. Santa Fe Avenue. The inside looks as if they just locked up at 2 AM one Saturday and never returned -- the bar, stools, and liquor bottles remain.




On the rear balconies above Ray's Place, apartment dwellers gather and greet the new day.




--------------------------------------------------------


Bruck Braid Co., 1200 S. Santa Fe Avenue. I have no idea what this company does, but I like their building.





--------------------------------------------------------


A church, around here? Holy Angels Church Of The Deaf at 4433 S. Santa Fe Avenue, good neighbor to the Monarch Bearing Company.


Last edited by 3940dxer; Aug 30, 2013 at 5:11 AM.
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  #16400  
Old Posted Aug 30, 2013, 1:26 AM
Wenders Wenders is offline
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Ray's Place... I was a principal in a TV commercial filmed inside and outside the bar, back in around 1997. I remember that the we were supposed to be in Mexico. The place had that look without having to change or add anything. Even the jukebox was loaded with artist from south of the border. Years later when driving by I noticed filming crews there quite often. Perhaps the "old look" is preserved intentionally.

Last edited by Wenders; Aug 30, 2013 at 2:33 AM.
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