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Old Posted Apr 8, 2010, 3:24 PM
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Abandonments

Old Taylor Distillery

Old Taylor Distillery is a defunct distillery located south of Frankfort, Kentucky. Constructed by E.H. Taylor, Jr. in 1887, Old Taylor was known for a fine, quality product that was the first to produce one million cases of straight bourbon whiskey.


Old Taylor Distillery's signature entrance, constructed entirely of Tyrone, Kentucky limestone.


Overview of the facility.


Taylor was involved in financial and political interests for the commonwealth, and was politically well connected. He was a descendant of James Madison and Zachary Taylor, two U.S. presidents, and as a result of this, he served as for 16-years as mayor of Frankfort and as a state representative and senator.

Taylor was essentially responsible for revitalizing the liquor industry that had little to no confidence from consumers due to product quality. He passed laws that would ensure quality, such as the Bottled-in-Bond Act of 1897, which was a federal subsidy via a tax abatement for products produced under particular government standards.


Offices at Old Taylor Distillery, now in a stage of collapse.


Additional offices.

When the Old Taylor Distillery was constructed, it was considered a showcase of bourbon making in the entire state. The complex included a peristyle spring house, sunken gardens and gazebos. The main office and plant were constructed entirely of Tyrone, Kentucky limestone. Inside were gardens and rooms where Taylor entertained guests and politicians. Visitors arrived on the "Riney-B," or the Richmond, Nicholasville, Irvine & Beattyville Railroad, where they would be given a tour of the facility.


The peristyle spring house includes limestone columns and ionic column tops.






A gazebo along the banks of Glenn's Creek.

Old Taylor was the first distillery to reach one million U.S. Government certified cases of straight bourbon whiskey. Times were great, to the extent that National Distilleries purchased Old Taylor Distillery in 1935. National Distilleries operated the plant for years before it passed to the Jim Bean Corporation. All production ceased in 1972. Jim Bean stored and aged bourbon whiskey in the warehouses until 1994, when the space was declared surplus.




Various proposals have been floated to revitalize the distillery complex. Cecil Withrow, a former employee of National Distilleries, along with Robert Sims, his business partner, purchased the property and incorporated Stone Castle Properties. Renovations began in 1996 at Old Taylor and in 1997, an arts and craft mall opened in the former bottling house. Withrow planned on including a natural spring bottling operation and a whiskey distilling business by 1999, but those plans failed due to financial ills.

In May of 2005, the property was sold to Scott Brady, who has been completing selective demolition of several warehouses that are in various stages of collapse or decay, and to renovate existing buildings. Wood and other materials from the warehouses are being marketed under Heart Pine Reserve.


Former offices inside the castle-like main structure were carved out for yeast tanks.


Fermentation tanks.




The East Room, which was substantially more modern, with blue-tiled walls and a reinforced-concrete structure, contained additional fermentation tanks.


Control panels.






The remains of the still room, where Old Taylor whiskey was doubled.










Bottling plant that was later converted into an arts and craft mall.

The photographs presented are the first published photographs of the interior since the facility ceased operations in 1972. Be sure to click through to Old Taylor Distillery for more photographs of the facility!

Original blog entry --
http://www.abandonedonline.net/index.php?q=blog&id=94
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Old Posted Apr 8, 2010, 3:50 PM
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Fascinating thread! The shots are gorgeous and I love learning about the history. I sure hope someone comes up with a plan that preserves most of what's left.
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Old Posted Apr 8, 2010, 3:58 PM
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...preferably including a distilling operation of some sort. Like good wines and good beers, the place where a whiskey is distilled, and the water it's distilled from, can affect the taste, which means that Old Taylor whiskey produced there would taste different than (and most likely, superior to) Old Taylor whiskey produced somewhere else.
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Old Posted Apr 8, 2010, 10:16 PM
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It's still manufacturered -- but somewhere else. The quality isn't nearly the same as what it used to be. In plastic bottles at that...
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Old Posted Apr 20, 2010, 8:00 PM
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Cincinnati: Little Miami and the B&O SW Spring Grove Industrial Track

Little Miami and the B&O SW Spring Grove Industrial Track

Two rail lines in Cincinnati, Ohio frame today's Abandoned update. Covering the Little Miami Railroad -- the second railroad in the state and the Baltimore and Ohio Southwest Spring Grove Industrial Track, both present a bit of history that is becoming long forgotten.

Chartered as Ohio's second railroad, the Little Miami connected Cincinnati to Xenia and Springfield. It later connected with Columbus. The Little Miami was one of the most profitable railroads in the United States, although its usage and importance declined after World War II. After consolidations and mergers, the Little Miami was dismantled in 1976, and was revived less than a decade later as the longest rail to trail in the United States.

The following photographs are from the end of the line at the Montgomery Inn Boathouse east of downtown Cincinnati to the Undercliff Yards. Fellow historian Jeffrey Jakucyk, of Cincinnati Traction History, gave additional background to the railroad, which is penned below.


Lancaster Street is actually a sidewalk that connected Eastern Avenue (now Riverside Drive) to Salutaris Avenue at the top. It is severed by Columbia Parkway.


This underpass was constructed in 1914.






This is the Little Miami at Lancaster, or milemarker 2. Note the abandoned trackage; only the rightmost track is currently used.


The abandoned Torrence Road station at Eastern Avenue. All that remains of the multi-story station and crossover is retaining walls and bricked up structures.








Original retaining walls from 1842.


A siding was recently removed that served oil storage tanks at St. Andrews Street and Eastern Avenue, now Riverside Drive. Note the abandoned trackage; only the rightmost track is currently used.




Note the abandoned trackage; only the rightmost track is currently used.


The former Pendleton Yards between St. Andres Street and Delta Avenue.






Undercliff Yards near Beechmont Avenue has shrunk in capacity greatly since the route into Kentucky was terminated.




The leftmost track is not used.

The second feature is small and modest. The Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railroad (B&O SW) Spring Grove Industrial Track was located in Cincinnati, Ohio and is currently out-of-service.

The former single-track alignment split from the mainline at the B&O SW Coleraine Avenue underpass, and proceeded south east of Spring Grove Avenue. By 1912, the line extended south to Brashears Street, but was extended as far south as Monmouth Street, where the trackage split to service two customers.

The rail line once served the manufacturing center of the Crosley Radio Corporation. It has been out of service for over a decade, with all track crossings removed.


Office of Coast Survey Historical Map & Chart Project, City of Cincinnati, Sheet 35, 1912.


A view of the trackage alongside Brashears Street at Arlington Street.




A view of the B&O SW industrial track at its end east of Monmouth Street.

Original blog entry --
http://www.abandonedonline.net/index.php?q=blog&id=97
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Old Posted May 11, 2010, 2:29 PM
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CINCINNATI | The demolition of the Friars' Club

The demolition of the Friars' Club

Cincinnati, Ohio can scratch off another storied and historical site, disguised under the veil of progress.

The demolition of the Friars' Club property at Ohio Avenue and McMillian Street in Clifton Heights, near the University of Cincinnati, has been a structure I've long overlooked. Abandoned since 2006, the four-level imposing brick building was the home of a non-profit social service organization that was dedicated to serving at-risk and disadvantaged children through organized sports, activity, nutrition and fitness.

The organization was formed in 1860 when it was known as the St. Anthony Sodality for Young Men, and was later known as the Friars' Gymnasium and Athletic Club by November 1908. At the time of its establishment, it was one of the only facilities of its type operated solely by a religious order. The Club operated out of the former Saint Francis school in Over-the-Rhine at 1610 Vine Street, and over time, an indoor swimming pool, gymnasium and library was constructed. But by the mid-1920s, the property was showing its age. The population was shifting up the hill towards Clifton Heights, and the school was just becoming outdated and too small. In early 1928, the decision was made to relocate.

The decision was an easy one: Large donations were received to help build the new structure, and a large lot was donated by Dr. Paul DeCoursey. The property included a three-story building, which was used as a temporary home until the new structure was completed.

Ground was broken on May 18, 1930 and the new Friars' Club was completed on May 17 of the following year. A dedication took place on October 18 and festivities were held for a week in celebration of the new home. Handball courts, a bowling alley, an indoor swimming pool and a gymnasium were some of the amenities featured, along with boarding rooms.


Friars' Club as viewed from Ohio Avenue.

Over time, the Club established a boating club in Dayton, Kentucky along the Ohio River, a summer camp near Milford, Ohio along the Little Miami River and a retreat house.

In 1941, Lumen Martin Winter, a noted muralist who lived at the Friars' Club, began work on a set of murals that depicted industry, music, religion and literature in the residents' lounge. For four years, Winter worked on the murals, although his work was interrupted for 18 months while he was enlisted as a chief artist illustrator for the Signal Corps under the Air Force. The murals were dedicated on November 12, 1944.


The Friars Club was known as the organization that put Cincinnati on-the-map in amateur basketball. Basketball greats, such as Frank Wilberding, Joe Schoettmer, Harry Janszen, Joe Scheve, among many others, played at the Friars and brought welcomed attention to not only the club, but to the city.

On June 30, 2006, the Friars Club relocated from the 60,000-square-foot structure to 2316 Harrywood Court, citing a lack of space and high maintenance costs. Demolition began on May 1, 2010 on the 80-year-old former Friars Club location, which is being replaced with a gated apartment community for University of Cincinnati college students will replace the imposing brick castle-like building, and will consist of 129 units in five three-story buildings. Construction is slated for completion by late summer 2011 and will be certified as a LEED site.

But the demolition of a significant and contributing structure to Cincinnati's history leaves me wondering. Is federal funding, via the Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant, being used to demolish the Friars' Club? If so, did the city pursue a review of the site, per Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act? And how does demolishing a large, reinforced-concrete structure, which was in great condition, be environmentally friendly, especially when the developer is seeking LEED status?

Progress doesn't need to happen at the expanse of our treasured historic sites. This building was well salvageable and stable, and it could have been repurposed into student housing in ways that today's cheap steel-and-wood-framed structures can never achieve. Good job, Cincinnati.


Swimming pool.






Locker room.


Gymnasium.












The historic Winter murals, being needlessly demolished.






Another endangered site, Old St. George, is in view.

Click through to the Friars' Club article for more in-depth history and for exclusive photographs of the interior prior to its total demolition. Enjoy this rather sober update.
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Old Posted Jan 3, 2013, 4:46 AM
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Cleveland's St. Joseph Byzantine Catholic Church

Cleveland's St. Joseph Byzantine Catholic Church

For far too long, cities in the United States have taken the case of rehabilitation of historic properties with a grain of salt. It is typically done towards the end-stage for a neighborhood, when there are precious few buildings left to save or when gentrification has set afoot. But what happens when there is no case of future rehabilitation of a particular neighborhood, when the building is stripped, gutted and left to collapse upon itself?

In general, rehabilitation or restoration of historic properties can be obtained with local, state and federal historic tax credits, rebates and tax abatements, which only increases the chance for a commercial loan to finance the project. There are not many cases, unless the next use of the property is arguably more density, a differing land use or some other mitigating factor, that a building could not be reused.

Earlier in November 2012, I came across the beautiful St. Joseph Byzantine Catholic Church in the Union-Miles Park neighborhood that was constructed in the Byzantine Revival architectural style. It had hints of Mission Revival or even Spanish Colonial Revival architectural styles, marked with semi-circular fenestrations, a low-pitched clay tile roof, and interior walls finished with smooth plaster. Two copper domes rested on the towers.

Below: Exteriors with details. All images are resized to 80% to fit within the constraints of the template. Click on the photographs for a full view.




















The neighborhood was relatively stable, decreasing in value and occupancy the further west towards East 93rd Street. Union-Miles originated as Newburgh Township which was founded in 1820 around a square known as Miles Park, which had been developed by the Union MIles Development Corporation. That area was once known as the Village of Newburgh but was later absorbed into the city of Cleveland. Its population began to climb steadily in the late 1800s and early 1900s with Slovenians.

The church, as neglected as it was, was the focal point for the Slovak community. During the 16th and 17th centuries, the Roman Catholic Church attempted to convert Eastern Orthodox Christians in the Austro-Hungarian Empire only to find resistance. The Byzantine Rite Catholic Church was instead founded that retained much of the Eastern Orthodox traditions while still acknowledging the leadership of the pope. Masses were held on Old Slavonic rather than traditional Catholic Latin and the Julian calendar was observed, rather than the Gregorian. A three-bar cross was also used in place of a Catholic cross, and clergymen were permitted to get married.

By the late 1800s, a significant Carpatho-Russian Orthodox population migrated to Cleveland. But the allowance of marriage by the clergy caused quite the stir with Roman Catholics, and a decree in 1907 permitted only celebrate priests to be admitted into the United States. Thousands of Byzantine Rite Catholics defected to the Russian Orthodox church, and as a result, the majority of the city's Russian Orthodox churches were constructed by former Byzantine Rite Catholics.

Musings for a church specific to the Rusyn population began in 1909, but it was not until 1912 that the first general meeting was held in Jelinka Hall on Aetna Road to organize a parish. A decision was made to purchase several lots for a church and school on June 16 and a contractor was soon hired. Within two months, the first church was completed for $3,000. The first Divine Liturgy was offered in January 1913.

In 1924, married priests were once again allowed to enter the United States, but married men could not be ordained as Byzantine Rite clergy. It was also the year that the nation enacted a national quota system for immigrants that impacted those from eastern and southern Europe. Between 1920 and 1938, only 7,500 Carpatho-Rusyns left for the United States. But by the 1930s, more than 30,000 Carpatho-Rusyns had settled in the city.

After saving funds for a larger facility, a motion was passed on September 17, 1928 that a new church be built on the site. It was designed by Polish-American architect Joseph E. Fronczak and a general contract was let for $60,000. The old church was renovated into a recreational hall.

Below: There is not much of the interior remaining intact. The stained glass was removed, as was most of the flooring and required supports. The plaster has delaminated from the brick in many places, ruining what was intricate mural paintings.




Below: Strangely enough, a piano remained.






Below: The apse mural above the altar. Center with a radiated golden glow is Christ as a child with Mary and Joseph on both sides supported with angelic faces. Moses is to the left holding a tablet of the ten commandments, John the Baptist on the right and God the Father towards the top.




Below: Not much of the alter remains.








Ground was broken in the fall of 1955 for a $400,000 eight-room school and parish rectory, which also included remodeling the convent and the razing of the original 1913 church. The old parish rectory, a wood framed building, was moved to an adjoining lot and enlarged to serve as a convent for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great. A cornerstone was installed on June 10, 1956 and the school – the third for Byzantine Catholics, was completed that fall. A high school was added in August 1957, the first built for Byzantine Catholics, and consisted of four temporary classrooms in the school building completed just a year prior. A formal high school wing was constructed in 1958.

Below: A 1973 photograph by Clay Herrick.


But the suburban flight was starting to occur. In the fall of 1961, the new St. John Byzantine Central Catholic High School opened in Parma and featured 16 classrooms, laboratories and shops. Originally planned as an elementary school, the facility was built at the Byzantine Catholic Center which broke ground in May 1959 and opened a year later at a cost of $500,000. As a result of the school’s opening, St. Joseph’s high school, with 124 students, was closed and the room reused for elementary students.


By the 1970s, the neighborhood began to decline both in population and in demographics. The congregation was steadily shrinking and the original neighborhood composition was being replaced with those of African-American descent with no connection to the Slovak community. With the Easter service in 1980, St. Joseph’s, which had dwindled to 100 active members, closed its doors on Cleveland. The building had been sold to the Greater Zion Hill Baptist Church, a mostly black congregation, for $65,000. Members of both churches joined for a service at 4 PM April 13, which marked the time when the building was officially turned over to the Baptist congregation.

After Zion Baptist struggled with the maintenance of the church building, it was sold to the House of Glory on November 1, 2002 where it was transferred in a quit claim deed to the Tiger Financial Corporation and sold to the Greater Tabernacle Church for $50,000 on July 14, 2010. The flooring was removed several years ago for scrap, and the property remains open and in a vastly deteriorating state.
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Old Posted Jan 4, 2013, 6:45 PM
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2313 East 55th Street

2313 East 55th Street

This Queen Anne-styled building at 2313 East 55th Street in Cleveland, Ohio was not only a residence, but home to several businesses and ruinous incidents.


In the 1950s and 1960s, 2313 East 55th was the headquarters of the Burden Syrup Company, founded by Everett Burden in 1935. The company manufactured Dalo fruit drinks and Burden syrups and was sold in 1976 to the Ashley Distributing Company.

The storefront later housed the Shrimp Boat, a barbecue and seafood fast-food restaurant that opened around 1967. Its location, however, was in a neighborhood that was in steep decline both demographically and economically. The corner of Central and East 55th had become known as a drug corner and was the site of frequent incidents - including three murders.

On September 8, 1970, Robert L. Weakley was shot by a security guard at the Shrimp Boat after Weakley had threatened to kill the guard in an attempted robbery. The guard was questioned and released, the shooting ruled justified.

In another murder, Derrick Evans, 16, shot Angus Berry, 18, after an attempted robbery on January 20, 1975. Evans had confronted Berry and two others who were on their way to East Tech High School that morning and ordered them to put any money into their coat pockets and to remove their coats. After Berry motioned with his hands, Evans shot him with a .25-caliber automatic pistol. Evans had earlier robbed a poor woman of a coat and food stamps. He was convicted of murder in a trial that concluded on June 7, and was sentenced to 15 years to life. In addition, he received four to 25 years for the aggravated robbery.

Below: A January 22, 1975 photograph by Tony Tomsic, sourced from Cleveland State University's Michael Schwartz Library Special Collections.


Finally, on May 7, 1983, two-time killer J.D. Scott, 34, shot and killed Alexander Ralph Jones, 44, a security guard at the Shrimp Boat. Scott had been sentenced to death in 1984 for the May 6, 1983 killing of an elderly storeowner at a delicatessen. The murder of Jones only added a second death sentence. On appeal in 2001, his sentence was reduced to life with parole after 30-years imprisonment due to his diagnosis as a schizophrenic. He was executed on June 14, 2001.

The property was sold to Paul Arnold in February 1983 and was foreclosed in October 2009. The lot sold at a sheriff's sale in April 2010.
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Old Posted Feb 12, 2013, 7:07 PM
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Cleveland: The Van Dorn Iron Works Company

The Van Dorn Iron Works Company

The Van Dorn Iron Works was located along East 79th Street in the Kinsman neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio and was founded in 1872 by James Van Dorn as an iron fence fabrication company in Akron. He relocated to Cleveland six years later to be closer to supply and shipping lines.

While waiting to submit a bid for cemetery fencing in Milwaukee, Van Dorn overhead someone mentioning jail cell construction. He believed that jail cells were nothing more than indoor fences, and went to add them to the company product line. Within a few years, Van Dorn’s company was the largest manufacturer of jail cells in the United States, some of which were used in the West Virginia Penitentiary among many other places.

The company expanded into structural steels by the late 19th century, which coincided with the rise of the skyscraper and then the automobile. One of the Van Dorn's early contracts was the erection of a 16-story iron skyscraper in downtown Cleveland, the Williamson. By the early 20th century, the company boasted over 1,000 employees and an expanded production line that included frames, fenders and other automobile parts for local industries. By 1908, Van Dorn consisted of four departments: the Structural Iron Department, the Steel Jail Department, the Ornamental and Light Iron Department and the Art Metal and File Department. The company also controlled the Van Dorn & Dutton Company that manufactured cut gears for shops, trolley cars and automobiles, and the Van Dorn & Elliot Company. Van Dorn was also pioneered the development of the mechanical dump truck hoist, and later produced tanks and armor plates for Jeeps and aircraft during World War I and World War II.



In 1916, Van Dorn expanded on the west side of 79th Street by constructing a five-story concrete-reinforced building.

Below: The Van Dorn Iron Works encompassed both sides of 79th Street in this 1922 view. The five-story expansion from 1916 is on the right. Image donated by Gerald Adams to the Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Library, Special Collections.



Below: 1926 views. Images donated by Gerald Adams to the Cleveland State University Michael Schwartz Library, Special Collections.





Below: The 1916 addition today.



In the 1940s, Van Dorn diversified by purchasing the Davies Can Company and the Colonial Plastics Manufacturing Company. By the 1960s, Van Dorn produced drawn aluminum cans for processed foods and plastic injection molding machines.

Van Dorn announced that it was closing its plastic injection molding machinery manufacturing plant at its 79th Street location in November 1990, and consolidating its equipment with another site in suburban Strongsville. A dip in earnings for 1990 also brought about the need for relocation and modernization. It’s third-quarter earnings showed a 94% drop in its plastic machinery division, operating at a loss. The facility was also aging and not adept to handling modern assembly operations. In addition, much floorspace was not utilized due to advanced manufacturing methods that simplified the assembly process and cut the number of equipment required. The new production processes included simultaneous building and testing of its subassemblies, team assembly methods, a moving assembly line and the pre-painting of parts.

The company also announced that it was seeking to relocate its corporate offices from 79th Street to a new building in the region.

The Orlando Baking Company, which had operated on the east side of Cleveland since 1904, had relocated to the five-story Van Dorn building in 1977. It  constructed new production buildings towards the western end of the Van Dorn complex but in the early 2010s, was running short of land and sought expansion space for a new production facility. At the time, production flowed east to west within the bakery, with raw materials delivered on the east side of the bakery and finished goods shipped from the west side. The bakery needed additional space for cold storage on the west side of the complex. Orlando pitched the idea to move maintenance and other functions to the east side of 79th Street, and to construct cold storage facilities on the west side of 79th Street at a total cost of $6 million to $10 million.

The bakery, as of 2013, used a portion of the five-story building for storage and office space. A one-story shipping building was used as a repair and fabrication shop for bakery machinery. Another Van Dorn building was demolished in the 1990s for a gravel lot.

A Phase I and Phase II environmental assessment was conducted in 2011 on the former Van Dorn property on the east side of 79th Street, paid for in part by the Orlando. Based on the findings, several areas of the Van Dorn property required remediation to protect bakery workers. The city of Cleveland and the Orlando Baking Company submitted a Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund application in January 2012, and received $1.3 million in May 2012. Demolition commenced on the Van Dorn Iron Works site later in the year.

Below: Recent photography of the Van Dorn Iron Works in a state of demolition.

































Below: To save on electricity costs, light wells were constructed throughout the complex.



Below: Inside the 1894 office building.





Below: A passing Norfolk-Southern train on the former Pennsylvania Railroad C&P Division.



Below: Looking southeastward towards the Mechanical Rubber Company site.



Saying goodbye to another historic industrial site in Cleveland.
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Old Posted Feb 15, 2013, 4:43 PM
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The Diary of Industrial Giants

The Diary of Industrial Giants

The opportunity to photograph an significant industrial site in danger of being demolished is quite infrequent, as most sites are inaccessible for reasons of security, reluctant owners or property managers, or liability. But collected into a corner at Lisbon and Evins streets in Cleveland, Ohio, at the junction of the Cleveland & Pittsburg Railroad and the New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad (Nickel Plate), was a sundry of businesses that made an impact on Cleveland's history, growth and influence.



It is unknown what industry first located in the area, but an 1898 Sanborn Map overlaid on a 2006 aerial photograph revealed that the earliest industries were the Cleveland Rubber Company, the Peerless Manufacturing Company and the Glidden Varnish Company.



A 1912 Sanborn Map revealed a slightly different makeup and additional buildings.



The Cleveland Rubber Company was founded in 1877 at Ellsworth and Lundy streets, and manufactured belts, hoses, rubber clothing and rings. It became part of the Mechanical Rubber Company in 1893 and acquired the Sawyer Belting Company at a later date - only for the whole enterprise to be taken in by the Rubber Goods Manufacturing Company.

The Sawyer Belting Company was formed in 1892 by H. M. Sawyer, a manufacturer of oil clothing, in Cambridge Massachusetts. In its early years, the company manufactured 600 feet of canvas stitched belting per day, and the growth was so potent that Sawyer relocated to double the space in a new factory on Lisbon Street on January 1, 1906. Production expanded to the point that more than six miles of belt was being produced per day.

Below: An early view of the Sawyer Belting Company.



The Rubber Goods Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1899 in New Jersey, and produced rubber automobile tires, bicycle tires, hoses and belting. One-third of the company, in stock, was owned by the United States Rubber Company.

The United States Rubber Company was incorporated in 1892 in New Jersey, and manufactured rubber boots and shoes. Through numerous acquisitions, United States Rubber had become the largest consumer of crude rubber.

In July 1905, the company acquired a controlling interest in the Rubber Goods Manufacturing Company and owned a 90% of the stock by the end of 1906, eventually taking all interest.. At the end, the United States Rubber Company listed as its subsidiaries in the Mechanical Goods division: Sawyer Belting Company,  Indiana Rubber, Eureka Fire Hose Manufacturing, Peerless Rubber Manufacturing, Revere Rubber, Mechanical Rubber of Chicago and the above mentioned Mechanical Rubber of Cleveland. Today, the United States Rubber Company is known as Uniroyal and is a part of the Michelin Group.

Another important industry was the Glidden Varnish Company. Founded by Francis Glidden, the company manufactured thousands of gallons of varnish per week to streetcars and railcar operators. It relocated to Lisbon Road after it purchased the Forst City Paint & Varnish Company in 1875 - then known as Glidden & Joy, and expanded in 1882 with the completion of a warehouse, boiler house and office, all designed by local architect George Hammond. In 1888, Glidden built a second factory at the corner of Madison and Berea avenues, also designed by Hammond. It was eventually renamed back to the Glidden Varnish Company.

Below: An 1882 view of the Glidden & Joy Varnish Company.



Due to explosive growth, Glidden relocated its facilities to Madison and Berea in 1906. Today, Glidden is one of the largest paint manufacturers in the United States.

Another listed plant was the Peerless Motor Car Company. Established in 1889 as the Peerless Wringer & Manufacturing Company, it was known for its washing machine wringers and then bicycles. In 1895, Peerless relocated to Lisbon Road and entered the automobile market in 1901. It initially produced De Dion-Bouton vehicles under license from the French company but later became known for its premium automobiles and was part of the “Three-P’s of Motordom,” alongside Packard and Pierce-Arrow.

In 1904, Peerless announced that it had purchased 5.5 acres of land at 9400 Quincy Avenue and had already started construction of a two-story, 258-feet by 50-feet long machine shop. It was to be followed with a foundry, an erecting shop and a painting and upholstering shop. The company was expecting to double its automobile output over the next year and that its present location was insufficient in size to expand. The new Peerless plant opened in 1906.

But its conservatively-styled vehicles, long lag time between new car introductions and the Great Depression led its sales to slow during the 1920s. The last car was manufactured in 1931 and Peerless then reused the former automobile plant to bottle beer under the Carling Brewing Company in 1933.

After United States Rubber closed its Lisbon Road location, the buildings were split to form an early industrial park. Several buildings were sold in 1933 to the Gerson-Stewart Corporation that manufactured cleaning compounds, sanitation chemicals and floor preservatives. It lasted until 1966 when the Lisbon site was closed.

Another was sold to the Strong & Cobb Company, which grew into one of the largest custom formulator of pharmaceuticals in the nation. It relocated from its site along the Central Viaduct to Lisbon Road in 1932, and closed its operations in 1972 when it moved to Cincinnati.

Other tenants included the Ohio Confection Company, Pennsylvania Refining Company, Western Machine & Dye Company, the Western Biscuit Company, the H.J. Heinz Company and the Loose-Wiles Biscuit Company.



Below: A 1952 Sanborn Map.



Below: An interior of one of the standing buildings that was used by the Ohio Confection Company.









Most of the site has since been demolished or is abandoned. The remaining buildings will be demolished for Opportunity Corridor, a four- to six-lane roadway that will connect Interstate 490 to the Cleveland Clinic complex.
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Old Posted Feb 16, 2013, 1:33 AM
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I'll bet that piano needs more than just tuning.

I only see red Xs for the first few posts of the thread from 2010, but a fascinating thread nonetheless.
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Old Posted Mar 21, 2013, 2:29 AM
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Cincinnati: Glencoe-Auburn Place, Queen City's first suburb, is being razed

Historic Glencoe-Auburn Being Demolished

Note: These are photos that I've taken over the past 6 years or so. This was one of my first abandonment explorations in Cincinnati when I still lived in Kentucky. I'll miss this place - not only for its history, but for its sheer creepy factor.

The historic Glencoe-Auburn Place and Hotel in the Mount Auburn neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio is being demolished after spending years in redevelopment limbo.

Noted for their pastel façades and a gothic-styled hotel, Glencoe-Auburn was the city's first suburb and contained six row house complexes and the Glencoe-Auburn Hotel. The majority of the structures within Glencoe-Auburn were constructed between 1884 and 1891 by Jethrow Mitchell and the pocket neighborhood was given the nickname “Little Bethlehem” as it resided within the shadow of Christ Hospital.

But by the 1960s, Glencoe-Auburn had become predominately lower-income and was referred to as “The Hole,” owing to its location a deep valley and along a steep incline. The properties had deteriorated and were in unsatisfactory condition. In 1964, residents of “The Hole” staged Cincinnati’s first rent strike.

The Glencoe Place Redevelopment Project, a wholesale renovation of Glencoe-Auburn in the 1970s, reduced the number of residential units and added new sidewalks, street lamps, courtyards and playgrounds. Each unit received new linoleum and carpeting, appliances, fixtures and drywall, along with new electrical wiring and plumbing. The project received several local, state and national awards for revitalization, and the 1988 The Bicentennial Guide to Greater Cincinnati noted that the redevelopment had been a success.

During the 1990s, Glencoe-Auburn once again declined. Many of the units had been neglected and crime had spiked, leading to a high vacancy rate within. The remaining renters were evicted in 2002 and the buildings were boarded up and secured.

In 2002, Pauline Van der Haer of Dorian Development purchased the Glencoe-Alburn and proposed the $18 million Inwood Village redevelopment project. Over the next nine years, Van der Haer proposed plan after plan, some incomplete, others unrealistic, that ultimately led to only one model unit being developed. To voice her disgust with the city and its processes that she believed were unfair, she launched Was Mark Twain Right?.



































Van der Haer received a letter from Christ Hospital in May 2010, which outlined their proposal to expand its adjoining hospital campus and invest more than $300 million. The project would include a 1,000-vehicle parking garage and new centers for women's oncology and musculoskeletal disorders. The hospital outlined terms under which it was prepared to purchase her property.

Details of the redevelopment plan were disclosed after Van der Haer filed suit in June against the city for $15.5 million. In the suit, Van der Haer alleged that the city failed to honor contracts to subsidize Inwood Village and that Christ Hospital was trying to purchase her development at "a fire sale price." The lawsuit detailed an April 8 meeting between Christ Hospital's chief operating officer, Victor DiPilla, city officials and Van der Haer where she first learned of the development proposal. The hospital offered $1.25 million for Glencoe-Auburn; Van der Haer wanted $7.7 million.

Van der Haer filed suit against Christ Hospital for more than $28 million in damages in April 2011, alleging that the hospital was tortious, deliberate, intentional and malicious with her plans to build Inwood Village and later Glencoe Hotel and Condominiums. In addition, she sought $10 million in punitive damages from the hospital and more than $7 million from the city. In the suit, Van der Haer stated that the hospital sabotaged her deal with the city for Inwood Village.

Eagle Realty Group, a unit of Western & Southern Financial Group, foreclosed on Van der Haer holdings and they went to sheriff’s sale in mid-April. On October 25, Van der Haer sold the Glencoe-Auburn properties to Leroy Glen Investment LLC, a subsidiary of Eagle Realty Group.

A Wrecking Combo Permit, 008800090085, for 2 Glencoe Place was filed on December 20, 2012 and was issued on March 13, 2013. Demolition began on March 18.























Below: Hard to tell from a photograph, but this corner structure had bowed out considerably and had structural issues.























Additional photos will be added to this thread as I process them.
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Old Posted Mar 21, 2013, 4:13 AM
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What a disgusting deplorable waste. At least I got to see them just weeks before they were demolished. Everytime an historic building is torn down I feel sick.
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Old Posted May 9, 2013, 7:19 PM
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Into the Hills of Appalachia

Into the Hills

Descending into the hills of Kentucky, which is my home territory, is something of a ritual.

Or a fix. It's similar to a drug that you need frequent doses of to really admire. The forested hills, the rural, dated landscape, the small towns, the 24-hour diners serving up the greasiest of foods and loads of straight black coffee. Out here, the faux city life is not wanted; it's all about basic attire, hardworking folks who toil to make electricity for us, rustic trucks, and a hometown warmth.

As I descended into Irvine, a town of several thousand, I came upon their high school which had recently closed. Constructed in 1930, the building is an excellent rehabilitation candidate into apartments.





Nearby was Ravenna, which was essentially a town developed around the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. Tucked into a corner was the Ravenna Graded School that was constructed in 1927 and housed grades one through eight.











I knocked on the door of what I thought was an abandoned addition, only to find it occupied. A wary individual stepped outside and we chatted for a few minutes about the old building, its past and its future, and he indicated that at one point after its closing in the early 200s, that it was used as a haunted house. Portions were set to be renovated into offices, but that work has seemingly stopped.





Below: A classroom was converted into a makeshift kitchen.



Below: The interior had mostly been stripped into a haunted house.



The school structure itself is sound. It could use some TLC and some money, but is also a good candidate for rehabilitation.

Exiting out of Ravenna, I detoured to visit Texola to see what remained of the former Texas Oil Company refinery. Also known as Pryse, the town of 800 was located along the Louisville & Nashville Railroad about five miles southeast of Irvine, and was named for pioneer David Pryse who had immigrated from Wales to Lee County. Pryse had later moved to Estill County where he purchased several hundred acres of land along the Kentucky River.

The company constructed a refinery in 1920 that operated until 1945. A post office was established under Pryse on June 3, 1924 which later closed.







I also explored a bit of the backroads towards Heidelberg. It's ideal, rural and isolated. I also found a nice cottage worthy of some work if I make it down there more often.





It's also for sale: 270-200-0287 or 560-8414 or 606-560-8414.

Down that way was a branch of the Richmond, Nicholasville, Irvine & Beattyville Railroad (RNI&B, Riney-B), which once existed between Versailles to Irvine. It was acquired by another railroad in 1899 and extended to Beattyville and Airedale. Another acquisition extended the line west to Frankfort, giving a total mileage of around 110 miles.

A branch was constructed by the Kentucky Coal Development Company from Heidelberg to Ida May via Sturgeon Creek. The 2.98-mile was built from March 1907 to January 1908, and the line was acquired by the L&A on November 1, 1909, only to fall into the hands of the L&N a year later. The Sturgeon Creek branch provided a connection to the Kentucky, Rockcastle & Cumberland Railroad. But a lack of traffic on the branch caused it to be discontinued on April 13, 1935.

Below: Piers from the Kentucky River truss still exist at Heidelberg.



Below: The Sturgeon Creek right-of-way is now used by Kentucky Route 399.



Below: An old general store at Brandenburg, just south of Heidelberg.





Below: What may be the former Ida May station.



After photographing some rural bridges (covered in a Bridges & Tunnels update), I came across the old Booneville Theatre on Mulberry Street in Booneville.





This quaint rural Appalachian residence was located in Turkey at the junction of Kentucky Route 30 and 1114. Before the arrival of manufactured homes that are a blight on the landscape, these hand-built homes were the mainstay of the hills. Understated, simple, authentic.







Closer to Jackson is the former Big Rock School along Cane Creek. The two-story structure was constructed of load-bearing sandstone by the Works Progress Administration and was closed in the 1970s. A neighboring church now owns the building and has plans to rehabilitate it.

I asked a neighbor, a former coal miner, if he had any information on the school or access. While he didn't have keys, he was more than happy to remiss about the olden days inside his small but tidy residence in a hollow. Warmed by a wood-fired stove, I felt at home as we chatted about the history of the area and the school.









After photographing Breathitt County's seat of Jackson, I ventured further south to Hazard and came across the abandoned Broadway School along Broadway. Constructed in 1912 as the first Hazard public school specific to high school students, it was built as a partnership between the city and county. Prior to its completion, Perry County did not have any public high schools. Kentucky's legislature passed a law in that year that required every county to have a high school, though attendance was optional.

In 1925, a new high school was constructed on Baker Street, and the Broadway School Building was used as a grade school and became known as the Lower Broadway Building. At the time, the city school system was using the former Hazard Baptist Institute for additional classroom space, but when the Roy G. Eversole School was completed further up Broadway in 1963, both the Lower Broadway Building and the Hazard Baptist Institute Building was no longer needed.

The structure was then reused for Hazard Community College in its infancy. It remained at the site until a new facility was constructed along Kentucky Route 15. The Broadway School Building was then used as an administrative office for Hazard Independent School and Kentucky Valley Education Cooperative. The administrative offices for the school district relocated on October 16, 2006 and the Cooperative vacated in 2007.

In July 2012, the school board elected to sell the building due to its deterioration with the condition that the new owners demolish the structure.

The lighting was not that great for a frontal shot of the school, so that will be covered in a future update.







I spent some time exploring Hazard's barren but historically interesting downtown - to be covered in a future update, and headed northward, visiting several coal camp communities including Krypton. My goal was to obtain some good vantages of mountaintop removal operations, but all of the abandoned residences, wayward sights and disorienting roadways hindered my schedule.











Exploring the hills of Kentucky. I got my fix that was long needed, and now I need more. A return visit is definitely in the works.
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  #15  
Old Posted Jun 3, 2013, 2:31 PM
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Shenango China

Shenango China

Shenango China was once one of America's great restaurantware and dinnerware manufacturers. Located in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Shenango produced Incaware, "Castleton China" and "American Haviland," along with other brands and styles.


Shenango's roots date to 1901, when several capitalists came together to construct a plant at Emery Street and the Erie & Pittsburgh Railroad, manufacturing plain and decorated semi-vitreous china. In January 1905, Shenango was forced into receivership and was reorganized as Shenango Pottery in 1909.

The company purchased New Castle Pottery in 1912, and all equipment was moved into New Castle's facility by March 1913. New Castle was organized in 1901, when the company purchased the plant of the New Castle Shovel Works and an adjoining handle factory. It completed additions and buildings to house kilns, producing semi-vitreous hotelware and dinnerware.

There was pent-up demand for dinnerware and overglaze hotelware by the end of World War II. Shenango responded by expanding the plant, adding space for decorating and a new 200-foot tunnel kiln. In the 1950s, the plant was further modernized and saw the installation of the first fast fire kiln, which fire glost ware in one hour and ten minutes - beating a previous time of anywhere from 36 to 40 hours.

In 1959, Shenango acquired Wallace China and Mayer China in 1964. The company was sold four years later to Inerpace Corporation, who had manufactured Franciscan and fine china. Inerpace invested into Shenango, adding a cup manufacturing system, new bisque kilns and decorating kilns. It had also developed the “Valiela” decorating process, which reduced the cost of printing greatly.

Inerpace sold Shenango to Anchor Hocking in 1979, who spent considerable money installing computerized body batch making, and new clay forming, decorating and firing equipment. Anchor Hocking sold Shenango to Newell Company of Freeport, Illinois, in 1987 who then sold the plant to Canadian Pacific six months later. Canadian Pacific was the parent company of Syracuse China. Syracuse, citing labor costs, closed Shenango and reorganized; all former employees had to reapply for their old positions, and many did not return.

Canadian Pacific sold Shenango, along with Mayer and Syracuse, to the Pfaltzgraff Company of York, Pennsylvania in 1989. The Mayer operation was moved to Shenango, and plans were drawn up for an expansion, but consolidation in physical plants and a downturn in the economy led to the permanent closure of New Castle’s facility in December 1991.


An auction was held in 1992. Many finished goods did not sell.


Two fires, both ruled arson, consumed parts of Shenango in June 2011 and May 2012.








Below: The power plant.


Below: Other scenes from Shenango.










Below: Unfinished ware from 1990.




Below: Unfinished products?














Below: Modeling production center.












Below: Modeling shop.










More on Shenango China »
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  #16  
Old Posted Jun 5, 2013, 12:34 PM
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That little White House in Kentucky looks extremely old. Almost has hints of French creole architecture from the 1780s to 1830s in Louisiana.
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Old Posted Jun 19, 2013, 1:38 PM
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Revisiting Jeannette Glass

Revisiting Jeannette Glass

Some time back, I revisited Jeannette Glass in Pennsylvania as I came across an outdated article regarding its pending demolition. Fearing that Jeannette could be gone sooner rather than later, I packed my bags, hopped into my car, dialed up some music and pointed my compass east.


Jeannette wasn't just an ordinary glass plant. Founded in 1887, the plant closed just short of its 100th anniversary. The company introduced the first semi-automatic bottle blowing machine, manufactured beautiful Depression-era glass, and had installed the largest electric glass furnace in the world to melt heat-resisting glass.

But a buyout by a Connecticut businessman who had no knowledge of the glass industry forced Jeannette Glass into Chapter 11 bankruptcy just a year after its purchase. The businessman, John P. Brogan, bought the profitable factory and bled its assets for quick personal gain.

Not long after its closure, New York businessman Abe Zion acquired the Jeannette factory for $4 million in a bankruptcy sale. Zion had hoped to reopen the factory, but there were delays - first by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection due to hazardous wastes and industrial pollution, and a fire in the mid-1980s that caused significant damage. The state attempted to force Zion's hand in 2011 and have him demolish the plant, but only minimal work has been completed since then.














































Not that much has changed, with the exception of some clearing and a few buildings that have been razed.
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  #18  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2013, 6:38 PM
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great thread, thanks

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Old Posted Jul 22, 2013, 8:30 PM
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Victor Brewing Company

Southwestern Pennsylvania was once a region defined by its neighborhood breweries, and loyalty to a specific beer was often defined by where you lived. The Victor Brewing Company was no different, and was founded by Frank Maddas in 1907 with a capital of $400,000. Maddas also went on to start up Republic in 1909 and Greensburg in 1916 to serve both of those local markets.








Victor's brewing options were terminated by prohibition in January 1920, and Maddas rebranded the company as the Jeannette Beverage Company, where it was allowed to manufacture de-alcoholized beer. Upon the repeal of prohibition in 1933, Victor was reestablished and soon grew to a production capacity of 100,000 barrels of beer per year under the Old Shay and Steinhouse labels.

But Maddas' operations during prohibition was not all that legit. In July 1940, Maddas was ordered by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to pay the federal government nearly $600,000, 50% of "fraud penalties and interest on an estimated $2 million on income that stemmed from the sale of alcohol during early prohibition. Maddas had sold "high powered" beer for $35 per barrel and only $12 for de-alcoholized beer, with Maddas pocketing the difference.

Victor Brewing Company was placed into receivership and was declared bankrupt on January 31, 1941. Fort Pitt Brewing offered to acquire the Jeannette plant for $333,000 and the sale was authorized on February 17.

Maddas was then named as a defendant in a federal lawsuit to collect $1.2 million in back income taxes in 1953, namely stemming from taxes that were owed during his sale of illegal beer during prohibition. As a result, his residence, a 13-room, three-story brick house with a three-car garage, was auctioned. He was allowed to remain in the house until his death on September 17, 1955.

Fort Pitt shuttered the Victor operations on October 25 and relocated 60 employees to its Sharpsburg plant. In 1958, Fort Pitt's parent company opted to exit the brewing business and focus on jukeboxes. The brewery complex was sold to Papercraft Corporation in June 1957 who manufactured artificial trees, gift wrap and ribbons.

In June 1966, new equipment costing $100,000 was installed and an additional 200 employees were hired. Additionally, land was purchased in O'Hara Township for a 780,000 square-foot plant that was completed in early 1967, and about 75% of its equipment and inventory from its Jeannette plant was relocated to the new facility. The Jeannette plant was shuttered in the mid-1970s.

Below: Inside the six-story brewery.


































Below: Inside the offices, warehouse and bottling plant.





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  #20  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2013, 12:33 PM
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That looks very familiar... When are you coming back over this way?
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