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  #221  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2010, 5:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brian.odonnell20 View Post
I totally agree with you on that. Architecture today is unfortunately based around the notion of expression and deeper meanings first, before an actually aesthetically pleasing design and style that actually works, which is wrong. If I were to design a building today, I would choose a style that works for the area, for instance art deco for new york, and try to bring originality and meaning to it from there as the next step.
No offense brian.o, but I'm glad you're not an architect.
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  #222  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2010, 5:28 PM
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Holy crap, I cant believe Beirut, thats amazing.
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  #223  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2010, 11:27 PM
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Some new development going on in the Woodlands, near Houston, TX.




photos were taken by me.
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  #224  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2010, 4:50 AM
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^Whats the point of building houses so close together when you could just build rowhomes?
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  #225  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2010, 6:25 AM
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It is still the suburbs and people like having detached homes so you dont have to hear your neighbors arguments and what not. Plus they are trying to get a Charleston type of feel with this development. I dont mind though, at least its dense well thought out development in an otherwise urban sprawly suburb.
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  #226  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2010, 10:11 PM
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Using stone or wood as a material isn't enough to qualify as traditional design. Some of those Beirut buildings, while attractive, are thoroughly modern.
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  #227  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2010, 10:31 PM
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Here are some images of residential or commercial buildings in Washington, DC that have been built in recent years (or are still under construction in the image). All images are from Google Street View.

















I'll find more later.
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  #228  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2010, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Do you have an address on this one?
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  #229  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2010, 1:15 AM
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That's the most interesting of the lot. It's a fairly famous building locally, at least among architecture types. It's the Kennedy-Warren apartment building, at 3133 Connecticut Avenue. What makes it interesting is that unlike all the other buildings from that post (which are new designs), the Kennedy-Warren is a bona fide 1920s art deco design that just happens to have been constructed in 2002. It's actually an addition to an existing 1929 building, built exactly according to the original plans.

It has a wiki page.

Edit: I forgot that I mentioned this building way back on the first page of this thread, where I included a couple of additional pictures. I've republished them below:

Original detailing from 1930:

source

Detailing on the 2002 addition - the only difference is the weathering:

source
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  #230  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2010, 2:03 AM
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Is art deco really old enough to be considered a 'traditional style' though???
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  #231  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2010, 3:04 AM
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It's a hybrid, but the fact that it relies so heavily on ornament suggests to me at least that it has far more in common with traditional design than modern design.
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  #232  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2010, 6:26 PM
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Stavros Mansion (49 rooms!), Teddinton Park, Toronto
http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...699999995,,0,0

Forest Glen Home, York Mills, Toronto

http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...7,0.01929&z=16

Mount Pleasent Home, Toronto

http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,0.004823&z=18

Faux Geogian Home, West York Mills, Toronto


http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...2,52.63,,1,1.2
[B]

York Mills, Toronto (various)

1)http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...6,0.01929&z=16
2) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...6,0.01929&z=16
3) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...6,0.01929&z=16
4) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,0.038581&z=15
5) Old and New (typical Toronto "flip")
http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,0.038581&z=15
6) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,0.038581&z=15

York Mills East (various)

1) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...3,0.01929&z=16
2) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,0.038581&z=15

Bayview Ridge

1) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...6,0.01929&z=16
2) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...6,0.01929&z=16

Bridle Path

1) http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,0.038581&z=15
2)http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...,0.038581&z=15
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Last edited by yaletown_fella; Jul 20, 2010 at 7:23 PM.
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  #233  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2010, 6:04 AM
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These are pretty good. I'll assign some grades IMO.


A



A


B+



C+



A



B



C



A+
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  #234  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2010, 7:09 AM
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^Yeah that last one is very well done, great windows too.

Strange though, there seems to be a real lack of cutting-edge design in Washington, any reason why?
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  #235  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2010, 3:02 PM
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We have our share of oddly-shaped buildings (two examples), plus tons and tons of tons of glass boxes that the architectural establishment likes to claim are "cutting edge".

But it is true that DC is more architecturally conservative than many cities.
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  #236  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2010, 3:49 PM
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  #237  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2010, 8:06 PM
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Guedelon Castle



A French Castle Built of Stone and Dreams
By STEVEN ERLANGER

TREIGNY, France — Maryline Martin, like a lot of little French girls, was besotted with the Middle Ages, with castles and maidens and knights. She worked for Pier 1 Imports for a while, then came back to this part of Burgundy and thought she would grow mushrooms. She worked instead in an agency trying to find work for the jobless, but the fakery and cynicism involved outraged her, she said.

“I decided to do something for them instead, in this very small part of the world,” Ms. Martin said.

So of course she decided to build a replica of a medieval chateau of the mid-13th century, using the techniques of the time: iron tools and no electricity.

In partnership with Michel Guyot, a neighbor who restored the nearby Château de St.-Fargeau, she bought an abandoned red sandstone quarry and the woods around it, which contained the oak trees, clay, sand and water (found, she said, by diviners) that would be needed for construction. The first stone was cut and laid in 1997, and now the shape of the castle is taking form, with its round towers, great hall and ribbed, vaulted arches.

The walls are now high enough that stones are raised using a pulley system driven by a man walking in a large wooden wheel, like a hamster in a treadmill. Plans call for a new wheel soon, in which two men can walk.

The castle, called Guédelon, named after the surrounding forest, is now a self-sustaining concern. There are 67 employees, an annual budget of around $3.25 million and about 315,000 visitors a year, including 80,000 schoolchildren, to this fairly remote site two hours from Paris. The regular entrance fee is 9 euros, and the profitable tavern is leased to a private company.

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  #238  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2010, 1:35 AM
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Id say that out of any building, that castle fits this thread the best, not only is it built in a traditional style, but its also built the traditional way, thats awesome!
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  #239  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2010, 5:17 AM
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Great contribution! Keep the examples coming.
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  #240  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2010, 4:17 AM
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On a much smaller scale...
This building was completed this year in South Pasadena



Last edited by JSsocal; Aug 5, 2010 at 5:52 PM.
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