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Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Atlantic Provinces > SSP: Local Halifax > Transportation & Infrastructure

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  #21  
Old Posted May 19, 2010, 10:09 PM
halifaxboyns halifaxboyns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
One of the problems with Bedford is that the route is not fully developed and the best rights of way are on the edge of the built up areas.

It would be best to minimize hills but I'm not sure how much modern LRT can handle. In Halifax the old streetcars managed going up the hill downtown.

For Agricola it would be interesting to consider something like a streetcar, but it's possible it would be cost prohibitive. I think the North End could fairly easily accommodate an extra 10-20,000 people (the development along Gladstone alone probably brought in 600 new people or so.. it's in the range of 300-400 units) and it's definitely worth investing tens of millions of dollars into transit to make that happen.
Robie Street from Young to about North Street is fairly wide enough that a train could run in the street - but then you have only one lane. The other problem is the pinch point at north street as you go down Robie towards the common; then it gets really wide.

I'm torn...
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  #22  
Old Posted May 20, 2010, 12:51 AM
musicman musicman is offline
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I know that alot of halifax is basicaly built on bedrock but there are significant sections that are also fill.. Why not dig it up and cover it over with a roof similar to sections in NYC or T.O. Then you can create streets above it.. I'm sure that it would be cheaper than tunnelling through shale and granite, and you create space where there was none before...
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  #23  
Old Posted May 20, 2010, 1:48 AM
fenwick16 fenwick16 is offline
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Wherever possible, have it (LRT - subway) running under parks (such as the commons and edge of the Citadel) and boulevards to minimize interference with services (roads, sewer, and electrical). It still must run along high traffic areas though.

I think that a major LRT project in the Halifax area (something similar in cost to the Harbour Solutions project) would bring long term benefits to the Halifax area. This is the sort of project that can get federal funding. Except it is best to do it right and have it all ROW (preferably underground). A short system could service Dalhousie U. and SMU, the hospitals, downtown and West Mall. From the West Mall it could eventually service Bedford and Timberlea (with heavy rail to Bedford and possible beyond). Bedford and Timberlea are likely in the distant future but the downtown to West Mall route should be considered immediately.

High density apartments and offices should be allowed along the entire LRT route. I just realized that this is the BRT thread. I don't think BRT will ever get the ridership of LRT. Philadelphia has a nice (mostly above ground system) called Septa (I was on the Regional Rail line). It is an older style but very smooth and comfortable and it runs within the city (and beyond, to the suburbs and airport). I am not sure if this would be referred to as heavy or light rail.

(source: http://www.trainweb.org/railpix/sept...l-11-24-99.jpg )
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  #24  
Old Posted May 21, 2010, 12:06 AM
Halifax Hillbilly Halifax Hillbilly is offline
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Philadelphia has a nice (mostly above ground system) called Septa (I was on the Regional Rail line). It is an older style but very smooth and comfortable and it runs within the city (and beyond, to the suburbs and airport). I am not sure if this would be referred to as heavy or light rail.
That example from Philly is heavy rail.

One thing I think BRT would have going for it in Halifax is it could gain significant advantages by exploiting some combo of transit priority measures and dedicated lanes around a few key choke points with bad traffic - especially Bayer's Road or the Windsor Street Interchange. With very little infrastructure buses could whiz past cars in these locations for some serious time savings. Even if you are caught in some traffic in other areas the advantage would be big.

Here's the idea explained better using Seattle as an example http://www.humantransit.org/2010/01/...l-seattle.html
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