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  #1  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 3:55 PM
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Potential New Hwy Speed Limit Increases

I still remember during the late 1990's, when the gov't of the day increased the speed limits on a broad section of BC Hwys.

From a personal standpoint, Hwy 3 between Princeton and Osoyoos was always a sore point with me. The posted speed limit was always 80 km/hr with a bump up to 90 km/hr on the short 4-lane section west of Keremeos. That place was always radar trap with the Queens Cowboys routinely patrolling same and consistently pulling people over. Then the entire section, from Princeton to Osoyoos, was bumped up to 100 km/hr (from 80 and 90) back in the late 1990's and nary a red flashing light to be seen since.

Fast forward to 2003, and the BC government commissioned a Speed Limit Review, which was prepared by Martin Parker, apparently a renowned North American traffic engineer. He recommended speed limit increases of 10 km/hr on most BC Hwys but the government chickened out.

http://www.th.gov.bc.ca/publications...iew_Report.pdf

Now the government has against instituted a review of BC highway speed limits with both the new preem and new MoTI minister on-side. About time I say!

Quote:
Ministry Eyes Increase For Speed Limits On B.C. Highways

CTV British Columbia

Published Wednesday, September 4, 2013 4:26PM PDT

Speed limits on B.C. highways are long overdue for a review and could see an increase based on current research, the province’s new transportation minister says.

It’s been more than a decade since the government last reviewed current speed limits, Todd Stone said Thursday.

“One of the things I think you have an obligation to do as a new minister is to take a look at everything your ministry is responsible for and challenge the status quo,” he said.

About 85 per cent of British Columbians routinely travel 10 kilometres above the speed limit, but it’s actually the drivers going the speed limit who are at risk – especially on highways, according to Stone.

“The person travelling 10 kilometres below is arguably of greater harm to him or herself and others travelling on that corridor,” he said.

Stone has instructed his staff to review the limits, as well as the policies behind setting speed limits, with a goal of producing a list of recommendations by next spring.

“What we would like to do is get out there, have a conversation with British Columbians and take a hard look at the data,” he said.

B.C. Premier Christy Clark supported the move, saying she’s received plenty of feedback that many of the province’s routes are too slow.

“I can tell you as a representative from the Okanagan there are a lot of people who say we don’t have the speed limits right,” she said at an event Wednesday. “I think it’s appropriate that we go and we make sure that the speed limits are right all across this province.”

Ian Tootill, co-founder of Sense B.C., an organization that advocates “sensible road safety laws and enforcement,” said an increase in speed limits wouldn’t automatically mean drivers would then go even faster on highways.

“It’s a fallacy that many people hold on to, that when you set a posted limit people will always exceed it. It doesn’t work like that. It’s been proven false time and time again,” he said.

Tootill said there is a safe travel speed that drivers naturally gravitate toward, and most B.C. highways are below that limit.

By raising the speed limit, law enforcement can then “focus on the people that are really exceeding the speed limit and causing the problems, and then I think we’ll all be happy,” he said.

“We have some of the best cars, the best roads, and people in British Columbia are no dumber than anywhere else, they can handle it.”

http://bc.ctvnews.ca/ministry-eyes-i...#ixzz2e2A7VGAq
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  #2  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 4:07 PM
DKaz DKaz is offline
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I welcome this. I don't usually speed, but usually I let my speed drift up going down hills to as fast as I feel like I still have complete control of the car. Why not let gravity work for you to save on fuel? Same reason I try not to go faster than 105 even if the speed limit is higher, and let my speed drift down to whatever I can maintain in 6th or 5th gear at 80% throttle, to a minimum speed of 80 (like up the Snow Shed, which requires 4th gear).
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  #3  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 4:10 PM
theKB theKB is offline
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This is a very welcome start to changing this with regards to roads in BC.

I won't hold my breath however for them raising the limits.

I do think they should repeal the 40+ regs however and change the language at the very least to "double" the speed limit. There is a huge difference as the law sits now between doing 90 in a 50 and 120 in and 80 (especially when the traffic flows at 110).

At least Shirley Bond is no longer overseeing this or anything to do with roads. That is a huge positive.
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  #4  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 4:43 PM
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I agree, I will happily accept a reduction within city limits on non-arterials to 40km/h in exchange to a complete review of the current limits. Cars and tires have come a long way in the last couple of decades and a periodic review is warranted.
The 40 over impoundment needs to be repealed as well, up the fines, have the superintentant review cases involving excessive speed and allow them to issue an impoundment on a case by case basis after the fact, but police should never have had the power to impound for speeding unless it involved a crash,liqour violation or chase.
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  #5  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 5:23 PM
go_leafs_go02 go_leafs_go02 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlousa View Post
I agree, I will happily accept a reduction within city limits on non-arterials to 40km/h in exchange to a complete review of the current limits. Cars and tires have come a long way in the last couple of decades and a periodic review is warranted.
The 40 over impoundment needs to be repealed as well, up the fines, have the superintentant review cases involving excessive speed and allow them to issue an impoundment on a case by case basis after the fact, but police should never have had the power to impound for speeding unless it involved a crash,liqour violation or chase.
Fully agree. I'm ok with the 40 km/h limit on residential streets that are worthy (ie, there are rural roads in Surrey/Langley that are now 50 km/h that I don't want to see them down to 40 km/h, when as a rural characteristic, going 70-80 km/h is a completely comfortable and reasonable road to travel (Hello 0 Avenue!)

Impoundment rule is ridiculous as well. I'd be OK if it were say, double the speed limit and you can impounded, but like someone said previously, going 70 in a 30 compared to 120 in an 80 are completely different situations.

Hope to see Highway 1 bumped up 10-20 km/h from Vancouver to Chilliwack.

Would like to see the following:

Vancouver - Port Mann Bridge - 100 km/h
Port Mann Bridge - 200 Street - 110 km/h
200 Street - Hope - 120 km/h (with some lower spots by the Vedder Canal Bridge and through Herrling Island where the road is somewhat tight at 110 km/h).

SFPR - 100 km/h

Hope - Princeton - mostly OK with, but a few passing lane sections should have a raised limit from 80 to 100 km/h, but alot of it is reasonable.

Coquihala should be bumped to 120 km/h.

Anyways, completely welcome, and seeing that the premier and Minister of Transportation is supportive of this, I see this going places unlike back in 2003.
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  #6  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 5:30 PM
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I think the Coq should be bumped up to 130, even though I will go nowhere near the limit most of the time.
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  #7  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 5:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by go_leafs_go02 View Post
Coquihala should be bumped to 120 km/h.
The coquihala as well as most major highways (no. 1 vancouver-chilliwhack) would actually benefit from a variable limit like used on the autobahn.

When the conditions are good on the coke, 130kph, when they get worse drop it down to what the conditions merit. Even on the no. 1 east of the port mann they could easily put it up to 130 and the drop it to 100 in rush hour if there is heavy traffic. Also cap all truck traffic as they do in europe to 80/90/100 depending on the road.

On the no.1 they could also vary the use of the HOV lane. It frankly is a waste at some times of the day.

I expect to see a few changes but I am not holding my breath to see sweeping changes that bring us in line to most modern countries.
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Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 5:42 PM
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Drivers should be responsible for reducing their speed on the highway if weather conditions require it. I was chugging along at 70km/h last November driving to Edmonton. Most drivers were on the right lane. Then you had some brilliant pickup, SUV, and semis driving full speed on the left lane. All the power to them if they happened to have chains or studded tires. I have non studded winter tires and 70 was the maximum I could drive without feeling like the ice ruts were going to steer me into the ditch to join the dozens and dozens of other passenger and transport vehicles that ended going into either side of the highway. I happened to be in a convoy of about 8 other vehicles who thought the same thing.
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  #9  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 6:19 PM
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Sea to sky highway:
they could probably raise the four lane divided sections to at least 90K
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  #10  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 6:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DKaz View Post
Drivers should be responsible for reducing their speed on the highway if weather conditions require it.
Up until circa the early 1970's sometime, the posted speed limit of Hwy 99 south of the GMT, Hwy 1 east of the PMB, and Hwy 17 to the ferry terminal was 70 mph or 113 km/hr.

Under the posted speed sign was also a small yellow cautionary sign that stated "Slower When Wet". I think that's apropos. BTW, I can't seem to locate a pic online of same right now.
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  #11  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 6:51 PM
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Yea.

Someone posted historic photos of Hwy 1 with signs in miles here. I can't find them.
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  #12  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 7:06 PM
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Glad to see this happening, especially since the report from 10 year ago concluded that the speed limits were too low. Many many highways in BC need variable speed limits, the driving conditions can be so different from summer to winter (or even in heavy rain). On the coquilhala you can safely travel at 130km/h (in a regular vehicle, and I'd argue higher in a performance car) in the summertime but it can definitely warrant 90km/h or even below if the road is covered in snow. Same goes for the Sea-to-Sky. Any of the 4-lane sections from Horseshoe Bay to Squamish should be 100km/h in the summer but may need to be lower in the winter depending on weather. Squamish to Whistler should be at least 90km/h (in the summer) for it's entire length. I'm sure I could go on and on talking about Hwy 1 east of Kamloops or Hwy 3 anywhere from Hope to the Alberta border.

I also agree with repealing the 40km/h over impoundment eliminated. As mentioned before, 90km/h in a 50 zone is different that 120km/h in an 80km/h (especially if that 80km/h zone is 3-4 lanes wide like we have in some areas around Vancouver!).

I would also like to see some smaller arterials in Vancouver bumped up from 50km/h to 60km/h. Granville street between 16th and 57th, Oak between King Ed and 70th, Cambie from 49th-59th, Knight Street south of Kingway immediately come to mind. SW Marine west of Camosun could be 80km/h, SE Marine/Marine Way east of Knight Street & Boundary from Marine Way to Imperial could be 70 or 80. The granville bridge could easily handle a 80km/h limit and I think Cambie could handle a 70km/h limit. If all that means that most local streets go to 40km/h that is find by me.
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  #13  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 7:09 PM
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Fraser Canyon until it hits the 100 zone near Lyton is mostly too slow. The 90 zone should go up to 100 and the 80 zone should go to 90.

Highway 5 Hope to Summit is ok at 110. Summit to Merritt should be 120.
Merritt to Kamloops 120, Connector 120.

Most of the other highways that I can think of are already 100 and seem ok to me.

Highway 19 on the island should be bumped up to 120 for sure.

I am a little wary of jumping up speed limits on rural roads like 0 ave that are used by cyclists but do not have proper shoulders. A recipe for disaster I would think.

The government should work on building proper shoulders on the highways. Highways are used by cyclists and I hear of the worst accidents on sections without proper shoulders. In Ontario this year a couple of touring cyclists on Highway 1 were killed on a stretch of highway with only 1.5 foot shoulders. I have noticed that on many BC highways the shoulders are inadequate width or non existent. The ones that are decent often have shoulders that disappear when there are passing lanes and/or barriers.

I do not support bumping up speed limits in the cities. Numerous studies show that bumping up speed limits lowers livability and results in more serious collisions with pedestrians. Streets in cities should not be turned into highways. They are bad enough already. They are called STROADs

The speed limit should be lowered on all residential streets considered "local" to 30 km/h and collectors with shared lane cycling facilities should be lowered to 40 km/hr. Arterial roads with shared lanes facilities should be 50 km/h but 40 km/h when passing cyclists. The 1 meter passing distance should also be legislated.

Last edited by tybuilding; Sep 5, 2013 at 7:44 PM.
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  #14  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 7:36 PM
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Originally Posted by wrenegade View Post
On the coquilhala you can safely travel at 130km/h (in a regular vehicle, and I'd argue higher in a performance car) in the summertime but it can definitely warrant 90km/h or even below if the road is covered in snow.
There are certain stretches of the Coquihala that just scream "autobahn" to me. Unfortunately, with the dreadful condition of Canadian vehicles and the apallingly low level of driver competence here, both in comparison with Germany, the highest speed limit I can ever see that road getting is 110 kmph.
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  #15  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 8:00 PM
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Um, it's already at 110. lol. Unless you meant you don't see it increasing.
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  #16  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 8:20 PM
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I'd also be okay with the province bringing back a mandatory annual vechile inspection once Aircare is gone. This would get a bunch of clunkers off the road making it safer for everyone.
As somone that likes to modify my vehicles I say this very cautiously and wish that any such inspection is only concerned with safety and performance.
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  #17  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 10:15 PM
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Hwy #99 southbound just south of the Oak St. Bridge: 60 km/h speed limit. 98% of the cars going through that stretch could be legally impounded.

One time I just tried doing 60 km/h on that stretch just for s**ts and giggles. There were some very angry motorists passing me with mean-looking faces.
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  #18  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by DKaz View Post
Um, it's already at 110. lol. Unless you meant you don't see it increasing.
Yes, that.
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  #19  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 11:17 PM
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Well the guys doing 100km/h on the Stanley Park causeway are just nuts.
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  #20  
Old Posted Sep 5, 2013, 11:56 PM
twoNeurons twoNeurons is offline
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I disagree with it being completely the driver's responsibility to drive within weather limits on roads like the Coquihalla.

MOST of the people in this province don't often drive on snowy roads. They live in the Fraser Valley.

Little known fact: Deer are one of the most dangerous animals in BC. Deer kill more people yearly than Bears, cougars and pitbulls combined.

Any increase in the speed limit on the Coq should be limited to daytime travelling. Deer are dangerous.
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