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  #1  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 2:28 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | 2010 Census data | 8,175,133 City (8,550,405 - 2015)

ALBANY -- The U.S. Census Bureau will release 2010 Census data for New York state Thursday afternoon.

The information to be used for redistricting was sent Wednesday to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the state Legislature leadership.

The Times Union will report on the findings when they become available Thursday. The newspaper also will report on additional information as it is released in the coming months.

New York and Maine are the last states to receive the data...

Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/local/arti...#ixzz1HWklmSQV
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 2:30 PM
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I've been waiting on this one for a very long time. Any predictions on New York City's population.

My guesstimate: 8,440,000
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  #3  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 2:47 PM
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Census 2000 population (for comparison): 8,008,288

I'm going to go out on a limb and say that I don't think NYC gained 400k. Especially considering how much the Census undercounted other cities.

How many significant residential structures were built, created over the past 10 years? Since there's so little greenfield to develop, there would have to be lots of conversions to warrant a 400k gain. Also the truth of the matter is that in order for all of these conversions to occur, poor families would have been priced out of the city into other areas of the metro.

my guess: 8,199,000
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  #4  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 3:16 PM
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Originally Posted by urbanactivist View Post
Census 2000 population (for comparison): 8,008,288

I'm going to go out on a limb and say that I don't think NYC gained 400k. Especially considering how much the Census undercounted other cities.

How many significant residential structures were built, created over the past 10 years? Since there's so little greenfield to develop, there would have to be lots of conversions to warrant a 400k gain. Also the truth of the matter is that in order for all of these conversions to occur, poor families would have been priced out of the city into other areas of the metro.

my guess: 8,199,000
I don't think New York gained 400,000 residents either. But I'm most interested in seeing if New York's black population stayed stable. Many areas of Brooklyn showed big demographic shifts from black to white over the past decade.

Philadelphia's black population actually bucked the trend among major urban areas of the northeast and Midwest, and I wonder if that is in part due to people fleeing New York.
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  #5  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 3:27 PM
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 3:47 PM
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Philadelphia's black population actually bucked the trend among major urban areas of the northeast and Midwest, and I wonder if that is in part due to people fleeing New York.
I think the same thing is going to happen to Philadelphia like what's happening to NYC right now. It's just a matter of time. The places where you've seen declines in population within the city has been in mostly black areas in Philadelphia. Center City, along w/ University City, Manayunk, Chestnut Hill, Northern Liberties, portions of South Philly, and now Fishtown are considered the hot spots in Philly as far as real estate is concerned.

I don't really see gentrification spreading any further to North Philly (other than Templetown, Brewerytown, and Strawberry Mansion), West Philly up to 52nd St, and South Philly up to Washington Ave, especially since condo towers are being built or is being planned to be built (Mandeville???)

As a black man, it's really no surprise why hundreds of thousands of blacks are moving out of places like NYC, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and even Philadelphia. However, as a black man of Trinidadian descent, I can't really understand why many African Americans would simply abandon Northern cities for the South, which is the cheapest place in America. Se of the reasons make sense (family, retirement, slower pace of life, lower quality of life, etc.), but you would think that w/ the amount of political power in NYC, Chicago, Philadelphia, and Detroit, that the African American political leaders would do something to stop what might be a black brain drain to cities like Dallas, Houston, Charlotte, and worse, Atlanta. Especially since the North and the West still commands a higher salary in comparison to the South.
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 3:51 PM
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Can't wait! Go NYC! Even a 2% gain would be a great gain for a massively built out city that is already at its historic peak.
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 4:03 PM
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
I don't think New York gained 400,000 residents either. But I'm most interested in seeing if New York's black population stayed stable. Many areas of Brooklyn showed big demographic shifts from black to white over the past decade.

Philadelphia's black population actually bucked the trend among major urban areas of the northeast and Midwest, and I wonder if that is in part due to people fleeing New York.
I think in the Times a couple months ago I was reading how the Black population was actually increasing in the fringes of Brooklyn (Canarsie, Flatlands), as areas like Ft. Greene and Clinton Hill gentrified. Probably not enough to make up for the lost population, but definitely interesting to observe.
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  #9  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 4:14 PM
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Expect state numbers to be between 19-20 million. The last estimates for the City were well above 8 million...

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=169130

Quote:
BROOKLYN................2,556,598
QUEENS...................2,293,007
MANHATTAN.............1,634,795
BRONX.....................1,391,903
STATEN ISLAND...........487,407

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/14/ny...l?ref=nyregion

The Census Bureau announced in March that the city’s population had reached a new record, 8,363,710;
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  #10  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 5:40 PM
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Bloomberg says census figures shortchange NYC
BY Adam Lisberg
DAILY NEWS CITY HALL BUREAU CHIEF

Thursday, March 24th 2011, 1:20 PM

We wuz robbed!

New census figures claim there are fewer than 8.2 million New Yorkers in the city - which Mayor Bloomberg says is way too low.

"We don't quite understand the numbers," he said Thursday. "It just doesn't make any sense at all."

He said the Census Bureau counted 8.175 million New Yorkers in its once-in-a-decade count last year - which he estimates is 225,000 too low.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...#ixzz1HXWrcCPL
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  #11  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 5:50 PM
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^ at least it went up, and by ~167,000 people. that's still pretty good, even if short of the bureau estimates (which seem to have been overinflated for nearly all central cities).
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  #12  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 5:54 PM
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^ or severely undercounted.
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  #13  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 5:54 PM
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About what I expected for NYC.
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  #14  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 6:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
^ at least it went up, and by ~167,000 people. that's still pretty good, even if short of the bureau estimates (which seem to have been overinflated for nearly all central cities).
Of course its entirely possible that the estimates were more accurate than the official count...
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  #15  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 6:11 PM
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These numbers are always adjusted later...


http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...118591539.html

Quote:
Data for New York show that the five most populous incorporated places and their 2010 Census counts are New York, 8,175,133 ; Buffalo, 261,310; Rochester, 210,565; Yonkers, 195,976; and Syracuse, 145,170. New York grew by 2.1 percent since the 2000 Census. Buffalo decreased by 10.7 percent, Rochester decreased by 4.2 percent, Yonkers decreased by 0.1 percent, and Syracuse decreased by 1.5 percent.

The largest county is Kings, with a population of 2,504,700. Its population grew by 1.6 percent since 2000. The other counties in the top five include, Queens with a population of 2,230,722 (increase of 0.1 percent); New York, 1,585,873 (increase of 3.2 percent); Suffolk, 1,493,350 (increase of 5.2 percent); and Bronx, 1,385,108 (increase of 3.9 percent).
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 6:15 PM
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http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/c...Yg4DVSAmat8HdK

City to census: Where’d all the people go?

By DAVID SEIFMAN and BOB FREDERICKS
March 24, 2011


Quote:
Ride the No. 7 — New York’s ghost train!

Perplexed city planners today said federal bean counters came up a several hundred thousand short in the latest U.S. Census, and that their data incredibly suggests entire neighborhoods along the Flushing local are a virtual moonscape.

The feds say Brooklyn’s population grew by a scant 1.6 percent while Queens’ barely budged, up just .1 percent, which translates to 1,300 people since 2000. Other boroughs averaged about a 4 percent jump.

"I’m flabbergasted, I know they made a big, big mistake," said Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz.

Overall, the city claims New York’s population is 8.4 million, compared to the census bureau’s estimate of 8.175 million .

The discrepancy could mean hundreds of millions in lost federal aid, and city officials vowed to fight to force the feds to revise the numbers upward.

City officials say other census numbers simply don’t add up. They point out that about 170,000 new housing units have sprung up in the past decade – while the census says the population increased by only about 166,000.
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  #17  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 6:19 PM
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Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
City officials say other census numbers simply don’t add up. They point out that about 170,000 new housing units have sprung up in the past decade – while the census says the population increased by only about 166,000.1
Maybe they noticed that half of those new units are empty.
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  #18  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 6:29 PM
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Maybe they noticed that half of those new units are empty.
Hardly.

Quote:
their data incredibly suggests entire neighborhoods along the Flushing local are a virtual moonscape.
That alone would throw up a red flag, but the numbers will probably be adjusted anyway, and its nowhere near the doom and gloom that was predicted over the past few years by some. It's good news that the City is still growing, but Bloomberg is right to suggests New York is being undercounted, as is usually the case.
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 6:33 PM
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I had census workers come to my building at least three times and ask me questions about my neighbors because they failed to turn in their forms. I suspect a LOT of people just didn't bother to be counted.
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 6:34 PM
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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/25/ny...nsus.html?_r=1

City Population Barely Grew in the ’00s, Census Finds

By SAM ROBERTS
March 24, 2011


Quote:


New York City’s population reached a record high for a 10-year census of more than 8,175,133,
according to the 2010 census released on Thursday, but fell far short of what had been forecast.

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg immediately challenged the count, saying it was “inconceivable” that Queens barely grew since 2000 and suggesting that the profusion of apartments listed as vacant in places like Flushing and in a swath of Brooklyn means the census missed many immigrants.

The 2010 census did, however, confirm a number of other benchmarks that were detailed in the Census Bureau’s 2009 American Community Survey:

¶ For the first time since the draft riots during the Civil War, the number of black New Yorkers has declined, by 5 percent. Non-Hispanic blacks now account for 23 percent of New Yorkers.

¶ The number of Asians increased 32 percent since 2000, passing the one million mark and now constituting 13 percent of the population.

¶ The Hispanic population rose 8 percent and now makes up 29 percent of the total.

¶ Non-Hispanic whites registered a 3 percent decline, the smallest in decades.

City officials said Thursday they had not decided whether to pursue a legal appeal of the census’s population findings. The city made a successful appeal of the census’s finding in 1990.

If the 2010 official count is sustained, it would suggest that the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, coupled with the impact of the nationwide economic collapse during the second half of the decade, produced much slower growth since 2000 than in the 1990s — even as the recession and housing crisis prompted more New Yorkers to remain in the city rather than retire elsewhere or move to usual job magnets in the South and West.

City demographers offered a number of explanations for the disappointingly low figure, ranging from the possibility that the 2000 census had overestimated the population to the likelihood that many addresses where tenants live in overcrowded and illegally divided apartments and basement cubicles, particularly in Queens and Brooklyn, were overlooked even after aggressive efforts last year by census takers.

While population growth is not always good, it is considered a byproduct of a robust economy. Fewer people also can mean less federal aid and political representation when Congressional and legislative districts are reapportioned.

Five years ago, city demographers persuaded the Census Bureau to raise its July 1, 2005 estimate to 8.2 million.

And the 2009 American Community Survey had placed the population at 8,391,881.

“If you say to yourself it looks like an undercount of 2.6 to 2.8 percent, that’s not out of line with what happened in 1990,” said Joseph J. Salvo, director of the City Planning Department’s population division.


While the 2010 Census counted about 166,000 more people than in 2000, Mr. Salvo said, the number of homes and apartments in the city swelled by 170,000.

“Immediately, you’re suspicious,” Mr. Salvo said.

Moreover, he said, there were neighborhoods in which the census found a disproportionately large number of vacant housing. According to the census, Queens registered a net loss in occupied homes and apartments since 2000 and a 59 percent increase in vacancies. Brooklyn recorded a 66 percent rise in vacancies.

“Huge swaths of housing have essentially been depopulated” in the eyes of the census, Mr. Salvo said.

The neighborhoods with high vacancy rates were not necessarily where new housing had been built, or where many foreclosures had taken place. “They’re in corridors of immigration,” Mr. Salvo said. “These are areas that are transitioning to newer immigrants. When the bureau went out they came up dry, could not interview people in those places and declared them vacant. Without regard to immigration status these are people who are afraid to come out.”
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