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  #1  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2011, 11:38 PM
DetroitMan DetroitMan is offline
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Budget Woes May Force Cities Like Detroit, Hamtramck To Combine

Municipal M&A: Budget Woes May Force Cities Like Detroit, Hamtramck To Combine

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Residents of Detroit and Hamtramck have talked about a possible merger for years. Last month, Michigan passed a law empowering state-appointed managers to take over the finances of troubled local governments, a scenario that local officials are striving to avoid. With budget strains mounting, local politicians now see a municipal merger as a potential way to resolve fiscal difficulties without state intervention.

Outside city hall, Detroit politicians have quietly considered the idea of combining their city with Hamtramck and Highland Park, another municipality surrounded by Detroit. Councilman Kenneth Cockrel informally proposed taking a potential combination even further, merging Detroit with the suburbs of Ecorse and River Rouge.

"It would automatically solve the population issue," Cockrel said. "But it's not like you can just go out and do an annexation next week. There's a process you've got to undertake, and, I'll admit, I'm not totally familiar with that process."

Even if a merger could solve some of Detroit's problems, Hamtramck might resist. Hamtramck residents see their city as a relatively safe haven within Detroit, which, according to an analysis of FBI data, is the nation's third most dangerous city. The police in Hamtramck pride themselves on fast, thorough service, and some officers and residents doubt that Detroit police would be able to provide the same level of protection.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/0..._n_852312.html
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2011, 1:41 AM
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That's a very interesting issue, especially considering that Hamtramck is already surrounded by Detroit. It's a valid question as to whether the Detroit PD could or would respond as quickly, especially if Hamtramck is seen as "safe" and "self policing." hmm..
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  #3  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2011, 2:28 AM
hudkina hudkina is offline
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I think a better solution would be to consolidate the Tri-County area into a unigov system. That would essentially give "Detroit" a population of 3,863,924 making it the 2nd largest city in the U.S. Granted, it would also have one of the largest land areas at 1,967 sq. mi. though about 1/3 of that would be rural and protected land.
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2011, 1:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hudkina View Post
I think a better solution would be to consolidate the Tri-County area into a unigov system. That would essentially give "Detroit" a population of 3,863,924 making it the 2nd largest city in the U.S. Granted, it would also have one of the largest land areas at 1,967 sq. mi. though about 1/3 of that would be rural and protected land.
If our fascist governor ever does anything to SE Michigan, dear gods let it please be this.
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  #5  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2011, 6:27 PM
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I don't think there's any benefit to merging Detroit and Hamtramck or Highland Park. I don't think there's even much of a benefit to merging Detroit and the downriver cities. I think with those kinds of mergers you'd end up with a bigger Detroit but it wouldn't help Detroit with any of its problems.

I think with a Tri-County merger you'd be able to share the tax burden across the region. Also, with everyone in the same population/tax revenue boat, it would be easier to implement land use policy, among other things.


But when the merger stuff got talked about I didn't think at all that it had anything to do with the city of Detroit. I figured it applied more to cities across the state, and to suburban Detroit.


If I got to play fantasy merger, I'd merge Hazel Park, Ferndale, Royal Oak Township, Oak Park, Huntington Woods, Madison Heights, and Clawson, into one big Royal Oak.
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  #6  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2011, 8:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hudkina View Post
I think a better solution would be to consolidate the Tri-County area into a unigov system. That would essentially give "Detroit" a population of 3,863,924 making it the 2nd largest city in the U.S. Granted, it would also have one of the largest land areas at 1,967 sq. mi. though about 1/3 of that would be rural and protected land.
Not happening. DOA. L. Brooks Patterson and Jo Ann Watson will be singing kumbaya together before this would happen. Although it would be the rare matter that the Detroit City Council and the majority of suburbs would agree upon (to hate).
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  #7  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2011, 6:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Cleveland Brown View Post
Not happening. DOA. L. Brooks Patterson and Jo Ann Watson will be singing kumbaya together before this would happen. Although it would be the rare matter that the Detroit City Council and the majority of suburbs would agree upon (to hate).
I agree, but keep in mind governor Rick Snyder has passed some legislation gotten himself some pretty unconstitutional powers. If those laws hold up in court he would have the ability to force it on them.
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  #8  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2011, 3:48 PM
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While it likely won't happen anytime soon, I don't think it is impossible and that's especially true with the recent reforms by Snyder. Besides, I think it would be much easier to convince the people to create a single layer of government for the region than it would be to merge one or two suburbs with the city. I think most people would be okay if A. the school districts were left untouched (for now), B. data showed such a merger would save most of the communities in expenditures, and C. data showed less regional red tape/in-fighting would help attract and retain businesses.

Besides, I think the city would need a lot more convincing than the suburbs. The suburbs would control about 80% of the regional vote and the politics would be much closer to the center.
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  #9  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2011, 12:36 AM
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Originally Posted by hudkina View Post
While it likely won't happen anytime soon, I don't think it is impossible and that's especially true with the recent reforms by Snyder. Besides, I think it would be much easier to convince the people to create a single layer of government for the region than it would be to merge one or two suburbs with the city. I think most people would be okay if A. the school districts were left untouched (for now), B. data showed such a merger would save most of the communities in expenditures, and C. data showed less regional red tape/in-fighting would help attract and retain businesses.

Besides, I think the city would need a lot more convincing than the suburbs. The suburbs would control about 80% of the regional vote and the politics would be much closer to the center.
Is this really the word you meant to use?
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2011, 1:59 AM
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Whether or not they are legal or wise, they are reforms.
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