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  #1  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 12:37 PM
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Red face Sugar House Redevelopment Thread....

There probably is no other area about which we are all more passionate and concerned about than Sugar House. A lot of news is coming out now about the future plans for this important neighborhood's redevelopment. I think we can all agree that this is one major project along the Wasatch Front that deserves it's own thread.
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Old Posted Mar 9, 2007, 12:45 PM
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Keeping Sugar House Area's Funky Ambience Is The Goal


By Jenifer K. Nii
Deseret Morning News
Specific details of planned redevelopment of the "Granite Block" in Sugar House are scarce, but one of the block's landowners said Thursday he is most interested in preserving the area's funky feel.
Eric Nelson of Red Mountain Retail Group, a Santa Ana, Calif., company focused on redeveloping retail properties, told the Deseret Morning News that plans for Red Mountain's properties should be ready to show the public in a few weeks.
The company's properties are the Granite Furniture building, 1050 E. 2100 South, and the Leisure Living building, 2208 S. 900 East.
Red Mountain is one of a handful of landowners in one of Sugar House's beloved shopping areas, bordered by 2100 South, Highland Drive, Sugarmont Drive and McClelland Street. Craig Mecham Management owns the property from the Blue Boutique around to Zions Bank to the south. Another family owns The Rockwood Studios, 1062 and 1064 E. 2100 South.
"We're still working through a couple of minor issues," Nelson said. However, he said, Red Mountain shares the concerns voiced by many Sugar House merchants Thursday about preserving the area's identity and keeping as many of the existing structures as possible.
"Our plan is actually to preserve everything that's already there and to reuse the buildings that we're buying," Nelson said. "One of my concerns is that we're tied to other issues going on with other landlords. And we aren't a part of those."
Red Mountain is in discussions with its neighbor-landlords about making the developments cohesive, but it is not the landlord that recently began issuing six-month eviction notices, Nelson said.
"Our plan calls for turning these buildings (the Granite and Leisure Living) into places where we can actually add more retail, and not get rid of it," Nelson said. "We'll be removing portions of the existing structures, but I'd say 90 to 95 percent of the buildings that are there today will remain, and we will just rehab them and keep them consistent with the Sugar House look, feel and style.
"The only reason we're buying in here is because we believe in what Sugar House is. We don't want to be another Gateway, or another Trolley Square, or any other development. We want to preserve the bohemian feel and what's already there."
In the near future, Nelson said, Red Mountain wants to present its plans to the Sugar House community — its merchants, residents and concerned citizens — to solicit feedback and hear concerns.
"We want to know what they like, and what they don't like, before we get into the final approval process," Nelson said. "We want this to be a collaborative effort. We probably have the same belief they do, that Sugar House is what it is for a reason and that it shouldn't be dramatically changed. Our goal is not to do that. Our goal is just to fix it up. We're in the business of redevelopment, not new development, and we think that the current feel there is critical to the success of what we're going to try to do."
As for those tenants facing displacement, Nelson said Red Mountain "isn't in the business of taking tenants from other landlords," including Mecham.
But, Nelson said, "if they have nowhere to go, and if we've got a place to put them, we'd absolutely love to speak with them.
"Our hope would be that Mecham's plans would afford them a place to go and they could stay with him. But our belief is that the tenants who are there are what makes Sugar House what it is. Getting rid of everybody doesn't do anybody any good. In fact, it somewhat ruins what's there."

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Wow, I'm really liking what this Red Mountain developer is saying. Hopefully this will force Mecham to step more in to line with the same goals!!



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Old Posted Mar 13, 2007, 11:47 AM
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Tuesday, March 13, 2007

'Granite Block' plan touted

By Jenifer K. Nii
Deseret Morning News
The owner of what is now one of Sugar House's most eclectic retail districts says his planned redevelopment will add value to the neighborhood while preserving its unique identity and that he is committed to improving the area, not destroying it.


Scott G. Winterton, Deseret Morning News
The owner of much of the Sugar House redevelopment area says the project will reflect the area's identity and feel.

"I have been in Sugar House for 25 to 30 years," Craig Mecham said Monday. "I want what's best for it, and I think that this (development) will improve the overall business-scape of Sugar House. I think it will be a great improvement over what's there now."
Mecham owns much of Sugar House's "Granite Block" — the area bordered by 2100 South, Highland Drive, Sugarmont Drive and McClelland Street — including the structure that now houses the Blue Boutique, Sugar House Coffee and Orion's Music, The Free Speech Zone and around to Zions Bank.
Many of those retailers have received eviction notices, and they, along with community leaders and activists, have expressed concern at what might become of the neighborhood's funky appeal. Many of the merchants said even if they could wait out the redevelopment period, they wouldn't be able to afford the rent in the new retail space.
But Mecham said the current building is dangerously unfit and only becoming more so.
"The building is extremely dilapidated," he said. "If we don't take it down it will fall down. It's very old, and it's antiquated, and there are some serious problems with that building that would be very costly to fix. It could be fixed, but it'd be very costly, and I don't think it maximizes the value of that ground."
While the new project may price some merchants out of the market, Mecham said it will be an upgrade to what is currently there and will provide new, different opportunities for the community.
"We want to kind of keep the flavor of what's there now, though it will be an upgrade," Mecham said. "It won't be quite as eclectic as what it is now. But when we get through, I think it'll contribute more to a 24/7 environment for Sugar House, and I am hopeful that it will attract all age groups and all kinds of people, including families."
Mecham said he has enlisted the services of an architectural firm based in Sugar House, and he is "hopeful" that the resulting project will reflect Sugar House's identity and feel. Those plans were not available as of Monday.
"In my opinion, it will enhance property values, strengthen retail and generally help the business climate of Sugar House," he said.
Mecham did not disclose the overall cost of the proposed project, though he characterized his investment, and commitment, as "major."
As soon as this summer, if plans proceed as tentatively scheduled, Mecham said the bulk of the buildings — from 2144 S. Highland to the corner, and then down about 150 feet — will be demolished to make way for upscale condominiums, office space and street-level retail. The buildings will be five or six stories tall.
Demolition and construction will be staged from the inside of the block, not from the street, so Mecham said traffic disruption in the area should be minimal.
From start to finish, Mecham said the redevelopment ideally will take 12 to 18 months.
"I just think it's time," he said. "I think that the property value isn't being maximized right now. ...
"I could sell it, and I've had many people offer to buy it. But I've opted not to do that because I like Sugar House. I feel a part of Sugar House. I've worked here for 30 years, and my grandfather owned property there before I came along. So I have a vested interest in Sugar House. I think it's a great place to work and live."
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Old Posted Mar 14, 2007, 12:36 AM
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Can anyone in the area get photos and/or a list of the stores being affected? I too have fond memories of this area and hope that the ambiance of it will not be forever marred.
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Old Posted Mar 14, 2007, 11:00 AM
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what an ass. If he really loves sugarhouse he would realize that is one of the only blocks in this city that doesnt need to be changed. Fuck money. The buildings could be fixed. He should sell it and buy out some other land for his condos. In that article all he is really saying is cash is king and he is the one with the power. What a dick.
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Old Posted Mar 22, 2007, 11:29 AM
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Sugar House 'buycotts' set

Deseret Morning News

Merchants in Sugar House located on the southwest corner of 2100 South and 1100 East in Salt Lake City have announced a series of "buycotts" to support locally owned businesses in the area.
Several merchants in the area have received eviction notices ahead of a planned redevelopment on that block. With expenses for each business estimated at up to $100,000 to move and recapture lost revenue, many of the businesses in the area have announced that they will close without increased consumer support.
The first "buycott" will be April 7, with subsequent events every other Saturday until July 7. The hours for the buycott will be normal business hours for the neighborhood. Each event will feature live music by local musicians, free samples and incentives to shop.
Along with the buycotts, Sugar House merchants also announced that there will be a coordinated open public forum for the public, government and nonprofit organizations to express their views and opinions concerning shopping locally, saving historic zones, preserving neighborhood integrity and learning what decisions go into zoning, master plans and community development.
Invitations to the open forum will be sent to local government officials and nonprofit organizations.
For more information, contact Andy Fletcher of Orion's Music of Salt Lake at 801-531-8181 or andyf@orionsmusic.com.
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Old Posted Mar 22, 2007, 2:37 PM
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that's a good idea by the businesses..I hope the buycott generates good interest
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2007, 11:57 AM
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Put in your two cents on Sugar House Park

Officials want local input as they draw up a master plan for the park's future

By Lori Buttars
The Salt Lake Tribune



Sugar House Park Google Earth.png


Sugar House Park River


The life of a city park is reflected in the lives of the people who use it.
Are you a runner? A person who enjoys a good barbecue and a game of volleyball with friends on a warm summer's night? Perhaps you are looking for a bunny hill to sled down with your kids in the winter. Maybe you have attended the Wasatch Front's largest free Fourth of July fireworks display.
Whatever your use for a public park, Sugar House Park officials would like to hear about it.
As the 110-acre park, near 1300 East and 2100 South, approaches its half-century anniversary, officials are formulating a master plan that will set the agenda for how people will use the park in the future. As part of the planning process, they are soliciting ideas from people who frequent the park.
"We had one open house in the dead of winter to connect with the people who use the sledding hill," says Lex Hemphill, president of the Sugar House Park Authority. "We're having another one in the spring and, hopefully, we will get some feedback from the walkers or joggers and others who use our facilities during the warmer months."
Officials say the information will be used to help form a master plan that will serve as a guideline for improvements and services provided at the park during the next 50 years.
"This isn't a master plan of grand design changes," says consultant Gerry Tully, who is also a past member of the park authority. "We're looking for answers from people as to what they use the park for and if there are any services that are missing that the park board should consider."
The park, which sits on the former site of the Utah State Prison, hasn't had a master plan since its original design in 1958. At that time, Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County officials came together to agree to operate the site as a park for 99 years.
Halfway through the agreement, the city and county have each chipped in $25,000 to help put together a master pan that park authority officials hope to have wrapped up by the end of the year.
"This will help us prioritize our maintenance and infrastructure plans," Tully says. "Many of the facilities and structures were built in the 1960s. We want to know, for instance, if people think there are enough bathrooms, if they are located in the appropriate places."
All this talk of a 99-year agreement expiring has Sugar House resident Sandra Perkes worried.
"They should extend that lease," Perkes says while out for a walk. "I can't imagine Salt Lake City without this park. Fifty years does not sound like a very long time, and I'm thinking of my kids and grandkids."
The park has seven terraces, two playgrounds, some basketball courts, a one-and-a-half-mile paved walking and jogging loop and a nearly two-mile trail that will one day hook into the east-west trail that will connect Bonneville Shoreline to the Jordan River. There are also soccer fields and a baseball diamond that are used by Highland High School athletes.
In 2006, the park booked 639 reservations, everything from the annual Strut Your Mutt charity event to company parties and family barbecues. Of course, the annual Fourth of July fireworks show, sponsored by the park authority, is the largest event, attracting nearly 100,000 people every year.
"It's a pretty popular park and is booked solid almost every Friday through Sunday during the peak season," says Craig Cheney, a Salt Lake County liaison to the park authority. "It's pretty hard just to drop in and, say, have a family barbecue on the weekend."
Overuse is also a concern of the park authority.
"One of the things we are asking people is if they want more quiet days in the park," Tully says. "We want people to use it, but we don't want to lose the quiet, sort of contemplative element about it. Because it is a regional attraction, it's a delicate balance."


* WHAT: Sugar House Park Authority open house
* WHEN: April 7 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
* Where: Lake Terrace, near the pond in the park's northwest quadrant
* Residents are invited to come in, fill out a questionnaire and offer their ideas for improvements and programs they would like to see at the park.

Last edited by delts145; Mar 24, 2007 at 12:02 PM.
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2007, 3:52 PM
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I love the Sugar House Park. It's a must keep.
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Old Posted Mar 24, 2007, 4:11 PM
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Me too. It's location and view of the Wasatch makes it easily one of the prettiest urban parks in the country.
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Old Posted Mar 27, 2007, 10:39 PM
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Public Invited to Share Opinions About Plans for Sugar House
March 27th, 2007 @ 7:16am

(KSL News) Today Sugar House residents will get to voice their opinions about the upcoming demolition of the Sugar House business district.

It's known as the Granite Block on the southwest corner of 2100 South and Highland Drive.

The owner of the building says it's dilapidated and needs to be torn down. A five- or six-story building filled with upscale condos, office space and street-level retail is planned in its place.

But many residents worry the demolition will take away the neighborhood's funky appeal.

Save Sugar House City Council Meeting
Tonight
7 p.m.
Nibley Park Elementary
800 East 2785 South

Tonight a public meeting will be held at 7:00 at Nibley Park Elementary to discuss things like redevelopment plans and the fate of local businesses.





Is there anyone planning on going to that meeting tonight?
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Old Posted Mar 28, 2007, 12:23 PM
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Sugar House changes debated

Development coming but residents urge council to keep the area unique

By Cathy McKitrick
The Salt Lake Tribune
Article Last Updated: 03/28/2007 02:59:36 AM MDT


The Sugar House neighborhood boasts a thriving retail-restaurant district that other communities strive to emulate.
But big changes loom on the horizon: east-west transit options, a park and trail and a new development that would replace some of the area's unique attractions.
Tuesday night, the Salt Lake City Council met the public at Nibley Park Elementary to discuss the changing face of Sugar House.
"I'm planning to settle here with my wife. You can't find a community like this anywhere else," Ben Trentelman told the council, warning that chain stores could move in and make Sugar House commonplace.
Trentelman was one of about 130 residents who packed the school's auditorium. Of the 20 who approached the microphone, one common plea surfaced: Don't make Sugar House just like everywhere else.
"Sugar House is at a crossroads," said Mark St. Andre, a resident of eight years. "It's about to be demolished and, along with the historic buildings that will be destroyed, we can never get back that intangible sense of belonging we all have. The last thing Utah needs is another way we can be homogenous."
St. Andre referred to development plans to remake the colorful block bordered by 2100 South, Highland Drive, Sugarmont Drive and McClelland Street. Several homegrown businesses received eviction notices earlier this month, a sign that the old Granite Furniture building and its neighbors could soon meet the wrecking ball. A mix of condominiums, storefronts and offices in buildings that could reach seven to eight stories high could take their place.
Westminster College student Sarah Johnson made a plea for the small business owners who are being pushed out to make way for upscale development and national chains that can afford the rent.
"This is a locally important area," Johnson said. "In America we respect capitalism but we don't respect monopolies. When I see these businesses being shut down, I see a gateway for monopolies to grow."
Matt Monson, who has lived in Sugar House for four years and is opening a business downtown, echoed these sentiments.
"In Utah in general, community constantly loses the battle to capitalism," Monson said. "I understand the right to succeed and make a dollar, but what we have here is worth more than the money that can be made with another stucco strip mall."
Councilman Soren Simonsen, an architect and urban planner by profession, represents Sugar House and recently met with several of the area's small-business owners.
"About 60 businesses on the Granite block will need to relocate," Simonsen said. "The potential impact from that is hard to put a finger on."
Sorensen said he organized a task force to explore low-interest loans and other programs to keep the small businesses afloat. He also hopes to compile a set of historic preservation tools to safe guard the community's unique character.
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Old Posted Mar 28, 2007, 9:41 PM
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"A mix of condominiums, storefronts and offices in buildings that could reach seven to eight stories high could take their place."



I still like the idea of new mix use buildings that high being build in that area. But I don't like the idea of how Sugar house will lose it's older storefront buildings and local business for this project.
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Old Posted Mar 28, 2007, 10:22 PM
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The businesses themselves are really cool. The property owner/developer states they will go after the same type of business flavor,"I hope so."
However, many of the current store fronts are gag ugly from the 50's and 60's. Even by that era's standards they're pretty awful, so I like the idea of these new mixed-use stores/residential. But, does that mean we're in for more of the look of that new Barnes and Noble? "I sure as hell hope not!" While the Barnes and Noble design is not particularly ugly, it is MAJOR BORING, "as in totally lacking in any kind of uniqueness, and can be found anywhere USA."

Last edited by delts145; Mar 29, 2007 at 11:17 AM.
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Old Posted Mar 29, 2007, 11:23 AM
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Thursday, March 29, 2007

Rail, trolley, buses: Sugar House looks at options

UTA holding open house on the issue Monday evening

By Doug Smeath
Deseret Morning News
An abandoned rail line runs at about 2200 South through South Salt Lake and Sugar House, unused and an "eyesore," as Salt Lake City Councilman Van Turner calls it.
One day, it could be a new transportation route.
The Utah Transit Authority has begun studying transit alternatives for the area from about 200 West to Highland Drive, and the possibilities include a new light-rail line, a modified bus system or even historic trolley cars.
UTA representative G.J. LaBonty updated the City Council on its study Tuesday, and he is hoping for public input in the process.
An open house on the issue will be held Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Columbus Center, 2531 S. 400 East.
UTA owns the old Union Pacific rail line that runs from about 200 West, near the 2100 South TRAX station, to just west of Highland Drive behind the Granite block in Sugar House.
Consultants are considering a light-rail line, either along the rail corridor or somewhere else in the area, a street-car system, bus rapid transit or vintage trolleys, an idea promoted by former Sugar House resident Doug White.
"I just think it would be both a transportation fit and an attraction for the community," White said.
He has started a nonprofit group aimed at turning the idea into reality. He has been offered a trolley from a company in England, which could be rented for $1 a year, because the company believes it is a good promotional opportunity.
However, White wants to run that trolley, which has a modern design, only until he can buy and revamp some more historic trolleys. He knows of the existence of three old trolleys that ran in Salt Lake City in the 1920s and '30s, but they need a lot of work before they could run again.
Whichever option UTA ultimately settles on, it will likely need a number of funding sources — including local, state, federal and donor money. Officials don't yet know how much the various ideas would cost.
LaBonty said the study is in its beginning stages, and it likely will be the end of the year before the alternatives are narrowed down to a preferred option. After that, environmental and other studies will be required. LaBonty estimated it could be a 15- to 20-year process before the new transit system is up and running.


Related,

Redevelopment worries Sugar House

Residents ask City Council to save area's eclectic feel

By Doug Smeath
Deseret Morning News
SUGAR HOUSE — Sugar House fans on Tuesday begged the Salt Lake City Council to save their eclectic neighborhood from a development they worry will bring a dulling down of a vibrant community.
The council, meeting at Sugar House's Nibley Park Elementary School for its monthly neighborhood outreach meeting, heard from about a dozen people Tuesday evening — and received a thick stack of comment cards from scores more. Most wanted to talk about the intersection of 2100 South and Highland Drive.
The block to the southwest of that intersection, known as the Granite block, is home to several unique local businesses — the Free Speech Zone, Artopia, Blue Boutique, Orion's Music, Sugar House Coffee, Pib's Exchange and others — but many residents and business owners worry plans for a redevelopment of the area will do away with its funky feel.
In December 2005, the council approved a zoning change on the block to allow for buildings as tall as seven or eight stories. Landowners, including Craig Mecham Management and California-based Red Mountain Retail Group, say they have plans to upgrade the area, though details have not yet been announced.
In February, businesses on the block began receiving eviction notices.
Orion's Music owner Andrew Fletcher on Tuesday said the zoning change "steamrolled over the wishes of the neighborhood."
One woman, who lives farther west in Salt Lake City but said she regularly shops on the Granite block, asked, "Why do we need to rip down that nice little Haight-Ashbury-type of street to put up more office space and more retail space that is not going to be used?"
Landowners hoping to redevelop the Granite block have told the Deseret Morning News they have no intention to change the area's mood — in fact, they hope to enhance it — and that they need to give it a face-lift because some buildings are out of shape.
Eric Nelson of Red Mountain said his plans would see "90 to 95 percent" of the area's buildings renovated but remaining where they are.
The developers say the local businesses currently located there could be part of the new development, but many business owners say they doubt they'll be able to afford it.
Simonsen, who tried unsuccessfully to revisit the zoning change shortly after taking office a little more than a year ago, has said he doubts the redevelopment can be stopped. But that doesn't mean the city can't guide it in a way that would preserve its character.
On Tuesday, he asked the council to consider a handful of possible actions and received tentative support for his ideas.
Among them would be looking into ways to make use of a citywide study of historical areas currently under way. The study, expected to be finished in about a year, will point out areas that need protection as historic, and Simonsen wants to be ready with ways to respond if the Granite block is named one of those historic areas.
The council was generally receptive to the idea, and it will be addressed in more detail at a future meeting.
Simonsen also wants the city to consider aiding local businesses currently on the block with loans or grants that would help them reopen on the block once it is redeveloped.
He said "various elements" of that idea will be presented to the council in the coming months.
Councilman Dave Buhler said money similarly doled out in the past was typically to help offset city action, such as light-rail construction work, so the idea in this case might be a little unusual. Still, he said he was supportive of the concept.
"Sugar House is vital, not just to the neighborhood but to our city," Councilman Eric Jergensen said, adding the city will find ways to protect it.
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Old Posted Apr 14, 2007, 11:38 AM
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Healing earth

Major International Art Piece To Be created In Sugarhouse As Open Air Tunnel

Patricia Johanson uses art to create a benevolent world

By Cathy McKitrick
The Salt Lake Tribune
Article Last Updated: 04/12/2007 01:40:44 PM MDT


Patricia Johanson, a world-famous environmental artist, works on art and design for Parley's Creek bicycle and pedestrian trail. Johanson, who uses art to heal the earth, stands at the site where an open-air tunnel will be built under 1300 East. The tunnel will be part of "The Draw at Sugar House." (Ryan Galbraith/The Salt Lake Tribune )

Don't expect to view some of Patricia Johanson's most notable works of art on museum walls or under glass.
For one thing, they're just too big.
Picture some problem areas within some of the world's most-congested cities and you've located her canvas.
"My projects are always layered so people get something and the infrastructure functions," Johanson said.
Combining the beauty of art with down-to-earth pragmatism, Johanson's handiwork weaves the worlds of normally crass human infrastructure with an area's cultural history and existing wildlife habitats.
The result? Art that can heal the earth.
"Art can be used to create a benevolent world, rather than avant-garde novelty," Johanson wrote in her booklet Art and Survival, Creative Solutions to Environmental Problems.
"Fair Park Lagoon" in Dallas took the New York native five years to complete. Johanson took a stagnant flood basin adjacent to the Dallas Museum of Art and transformed it from a deathtrap into an educational playground and thriving ecosystem.
"People had no experience of the water - which spanned five blocks - except that a number of children had fallen in and drowned," Johanson wrote.
In town this week to work on "The Draw at Sugar House" - the 220-foot open-air tunnel that will cross under 1300 East - Johanson reminisced about the opening of "Fair Park Lagoon" in 1986.
"A huge flock of birds flew in at the dedication," Johanson said, reflecting on what she took as a positive sign that, given the right conditions, life can return to areas gone dead from neglect. "It's now a national historic landmark."
Johanson's Sugar House design - a collaborative effort with Salt Lake City-based G. Brown Design Inc. - incorporates a giant Sego Lily and the snakelike shape of Parley's Creek to link Hidden Hollow to the west to Sugar House Park and Parley's Canyon on the east.
The bulb of the Sego Lily serves as a roadside overlook and also the roof of the underground crossing. The lily's stem and leaf form paths through the park.
"Parley Pratt tells a very engaging story," said Johanson, who read the Mormon pioneer's journals in detail. Pratt was in the initial advance party that descended into the Sugar House area to survey the land.
"They were hacking through the underbrush, with thorns pressing in on all sides. Pratt heard the rattle of a snake and blessed it rather than trying to kill it. The snake withdrew," Johanson said.
She took daily walks through the area, mulling Pratt's writings and the subsequent settlers and their mills.
Johanson said she also thought about the life-giving nature of water and the current jumble of activity on 1300 East, with the restaurants, gas stations and fast traffic.
"I understood why this crossing is needed," she said.
Along Parley's Creek, Johanson envisioned "Snow's Snake," a winding creek-side trail named for Erastus Snow, another pioneer who entered the area with Pratt.
Johanson plans to capture stormwater runoff, via three waterfalls, to bolster the flow in Parley's Creek and install decorative retaining walls to promote sustainability in the area.
Born in 1940, Johanson married art critic E.C. Goossen in 1973. The couple reared three children. She earned two bachelor's degrees, in art and architecture, then later returned for a master's in art history.
Other projects include the 912-acre Ulsan Dragon Park in South Korea and the Rocky Marciano Trail in Brockton, Mass.
Like Pratt and Snow, Johanson is a pioneer.
"This work wasn't being done when I started," she said, acknowledging that projects - several designs throughout the country remain undone - often get political, and budgets get slashed halfway through the process.
Federal transit dollars and Salt Lake County ZAP funds will be tapped for the $5 million Draw, supplemented by private donations from the community.
"Our goal is to raise $2 million to make sure all the elements that Patricia and Jerry Brown designed will be included," said Lynne Olson, vice chair of the PRATT Coalition. "It will be a major international art piece when it's done, so it has to be perfect."


* 1992: Pedestrian passage across 1300 East incorporated into Salt Lake City's Open Space Master Plan
* 1998: Beacon Heights Elementary students study how to connect Hidden Hollow to Sugar House Park via a 1300 East pedestrian crossing
* 2000: Their adult advisers join trail advocates to form Parley's Rails, Trails and Tunnels (PRATT) Coalition
* 2002: Salt Lake City sponsors a national competition to design that connection; G. Brown Design and environmental artist Patricia Johanson are selected
* 2008: Construction on "The Draw at Sugar House" is expected to start early in the year and finish by year's end
* For more information about "The Draw at Sugar House," visit www.parleystrail.org/initiatives.php.
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  #17  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2007, 6:24 PM
rmarkosian rmarkosian is offline
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Sugarhouse merchant photos and video


more photos and video interviews here
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  #18  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2007, 6:29 PM
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Comrade Comrade is offline
They all float down here
 
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I don't mind losing those store fronts, but many weren't built in the 1960s and 70s. They were reclad in the 60s and 70s, which ultimately made them ugly. I bet if you stripped them of that recladding, it would look pretty awesome.

With that said, it won't mean lick how nice it looks if it's just nothing but chain retail and restaurants. SugarHouse is more a vibe than a look and if that vibe is lost, what will make it unique from the rest of the valley?

As they say in Austin, keep Austin weird. Well I say keep SugarHouse weird.
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  #19  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2007, 7:05 PM
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PHX31 PHX31 is offline
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I ended up in SugarHouse when i was in Utah this past winter. We had some lunch at a coffeehouse place, and walked up the street for just a little bit. The area looked quait and unique, and the vibe was better than anywhere else in the city. Some of the store fronts were pretty crappy (70s ish), but many were not. Even then, I would hope (for the area's sake) the place stays the same...
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  #20  
Old Posted Aug 23, 2007, 2:26 AM
enjo13 enjo13 is offline
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This thread cracks me up because there is a new swingers club in Denver apparently called "Sugar House" I keep seeing it going "wtf is this doing on SSP".
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